The Morning Calm Korea Weekly - July 28, 2006

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The Morning Calm Weekly is a U.S. Army Command Information newspaper primarily targeted towards the U.S. Military community serving, working and living at U.S. Army Installations in the Republic of Korea.

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Volume 4, Issue 40

P UBLISHED F OR T HOSE S ERVING

IN THE

R EPUBLIC

OF

KOREA

July 28, 2006

The Morning Calm Weekly is

Area III ‘distinguished dogs’ chosen
Page 23

First woman named to 2ID color guard
Page 16

nline
Visit http:// ima.korea.army.mil

CFC announces Exercise Ulchi Exercise Lens Focus Lens

1-72 tankers roar up Rodriguez Range
By Pfc. Kim Sang Pil
Second Infantry Division Public Affairs

USFK Public Affairs YONGSAN GARRISON — The Republic of Korea and United States Combined Forces Command will conduct exercise Ulchi Focus Lens from Aug. 21 until Sept. 1, 2006. Ulchi Focus Lens 2006 is a simulation-driven, command post exercise that will involve both United States and Republic of Korea forces who are currently stationed here. A small number of U.S. personnel will also travel to Korea to participate. Ulchi Focus Lens is a regularly scheduled, annual training exercise. UFL 2006 is the 32nd iteration of this series which began in 1975. The exercise is designed to train, evaluate and improve combined and joint procedures, plans, and systems for conducting operations critical to the defense of the peninsula.

RODRIGUEZ RANGE – The rainy season continued as 1st Battalion, 72nd Armor Regiment carried on the July gunnery exercise at Rodriguez Live Fire Complex. “We have 29 tanks and 43 Bradleys,” said Lt. Col. Thomas Isom, 1-72 commander. “It is a fun unit to train. Every day, we have a lot going on. “Today, three companies of Bradleys are out here for Table VII, a series of scenarios that starts with Table I.” Soldiers begin training with a dryfire exercise and build up to Bradley crew qualification table. The ultimate training for Bradley crews is Table XII — a platoon-level exercise. Rainfall throughout July has been a major factor in the training. “Bad weather only affects vision, not accuracy,” Isom said. “But once a rain like this pours down on range,

An M1A1 Abrams tank heads for the decontamination area after finishing its portion of the Table VIII firing exercise. down in a room for after an action we have to cease fire because report, reviewing in detail what safety is one of our top went right and what went wrong. priorities.” Once the shooting is done, the See Tankers, Page 4 driver, commander and gunner sit

PFC. KIM SANG PIL

Survey: Troops believe in Iraq mission, morale generally high Survey:
American Forces Press Service called it “somewhat clear.” Nine percent said it’s WASHINGTON – Two-thirds of U.S. troops “somewhat unclear,” and 7 percent said it’s “not at serving in Iraq say they believe the cause they’re all clear.” fighting for is worthwhile, according to a new Stars Unit morale is high, and personal morale even and Stripes survey. higher, most respondents said. Forty-four percent The survey results, reported in the July 19 called unit morale “very high,” and 43 percent gave Mideast edition of Stars and Stripes newspaper, the same ranking for their personal morale. Eighteen revealed that 46 percent of readers in Iraq who percent called their unit morale “somewhat high,” responded to a survey called fighting the war for and 30 percent ranked their personal morale at that America “very worthwhile.” level. “ Unit morale is high, Twenty-six percent of Another 30 percent rated it “somewhat worthwhile.” and personal morale even respondents called unit morale Fourteen percent of respondents higher ... Forty-four percent “somewhat low,” and 19 percent called the mission “not very called unit morale “very gave that rating for their personal worthwhile,” and just 8 percent morale. Ten percent reported “very referred to it as “not worthwhile at high.” low” unit morale, and 6 percent all,” the July 20 paper reported. rated their personal morale at rock The survey explored readers’ views on a variety bottom. of other issues. Among them were how clearly their The vast majority of deployed troops agreed that mission is defined, their unit’s as well as their public support for troops in the Middle East is personal morale, support for troops in the Middle strong. Forty-four percent rated it “very strong,” East, and how informed they are about that support. and 26 percent called it “somewhat strong.” Respondents overwhelmingly agreed that their Twenty-two percent of respondents called it “not mission is clearly defined, the survey noted. Fiftyvery strong,” and 6 percent “weak.” five percent called it “very clear” and 27 percent Two-thirds of respondents believe they’re well informed about what the public is doing to support troops serving in the Middle East, the survey showed. Forty-four percent called themselves “very well informed,” 20 percent “somewhat informed,” 28 percent “not very well informed,” and 6 percent rated themselves “not well (informed) at all.” Responses appeared to track with military rank. Eight-eight percent of senior officers, for example, ranked both unit and personal morale as high or very high. Among junior enlisted servicemembers, 49 percent rated unit morale as high or very high and 66 percent gave that same rating to their own personal morale. Almost across the board, respondents said conditions in Iraq had improved since they arrived there. Sixty-nine percent of senior officers, 66 percent of senior enlisted members and 64 percent of junior enlisted troops said conditions were very or somewhat improved. Forty-eight percent of junior officers assigned that rating to conditions. Nearly 600 Stars and Stripes readers in Iraq responded to the survey, and the results were compiled by media experts from MORI Research, the newspaper reported.

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Voter responsibility knows no borders
By Capt. Elisabeth Mahoney
Special to The Morning Calm Weekly

July 28, 2006

Commentary
July 18, USS ENTERPRISE once again made history when it arrived at the Republic of Korea Navy’s 3rd Fleet Naval Base in Pusan. The U.S. Navy’s first nuclear-powered carrier making the first ever pier-side port visit on the ROK Navy’s newest naval facility was noted throughout the peninsula, the Pacific Theater and indeed the world. I am very proud and greatly appreciative of everyone who made this visit so successful. The exemplary performance by the officers and crews of Carrier Strike Group Twelve, Carrier Airwing One, Destroyer Squadron Two, USS ENTERPRISE and USS CHANCELLORSVILLE during this port visit made the visit a home run for the ROK-U.S. Alliance. It had an extremely positive impact on our relations with our ROK hosts, as well as making Korea a desired liberty port for

The Morning Calm Weekly

November will be here sooner than you think. Don’t forget to register to vote. Voting is a great way to serve your country and to make sure it is serving you. Servicemembers, their family and DOD civilians can all exercise their right to vote regardless of where they are stationed, through absentee ballots. The Uniformed and Overseas Voting Act protects the voting rights of active-duty servicemembers, their family members and citizens residing abroad. The Federal Voting Assistance Program was established to implement the Act. Each installation has a Senior Voting Assistance Officer and each unit has as Voting Assistance Officer. For information, individuals may contact their Voting Assistance Officers if they have any questions about voter registration or voting by absentee ballots. Am I eligible to vote? You must be a citizen of the United States and be 18 years old on election day, to be eligible to vote. How do I register to vote or apply for an absentee ballot? The Federal Post Card Application is accepted by all states as an application for absentee voter registration and a request for an absentee ballot. You can get a FPCA from your VAO or access it on online at www.fvap.gov. Once completed, return the FPCA to the appropriate election official in the state where you legally reside. Absentee voters should request their ballots at least 60 days before the election. Upon receipt of the FPCA, the local election official will process the request. Remember to provide an e-mail

Pusan port B USS Enterprise makes historic Pusan port visit E L L

S E N D S
# 16-06

our deployed forces. Today and after an enormously successful visit, all elements of Carrier Strike Group twelve who were in port at Pusan have departed Korea on the next leg of their continuing mission. Our ROK-U.S. Combined Forces Command Motto “We Go Together” reflects not only the combined capabilities of the ROK-U.S. forces on the peninsula, but also our ability to project military forces to Korea in the event of crisis. The ENTERPRISE visit was significant because it symbolically and publicly reinforced our willingness to support our ally. Again, I greatly appreciate everyone who made this port visit so successful. I am very proud of the sailors of the American Navy who so selflessly serve their nation while conducting operations so far from home.

Gen. B.B. Bell United Nations Command/Combined Forces Command/U.S. Forces Korea commander Fair winds and following seas to a great team of professional patriots!

General, U.S. Army Commander

MP Blotter
The following entries were excerpted from the military police blotters. These entries may be incomplete and do not imply the guilt or innocence of any person. Area 1 Shoplifting — Subject 1 was observed via closed circuit television placing two Game Boy Advance SPs in his/her ACU trouser pocket and exiting without rendering proper payment. Subject was detained and transported to the Provost Marshal Office, where he/she was advised of his/her legal rights, which he/she invoked, requesting a lawyer and not to be questioned or say anything. Subject 1 was released to his/her unit. This is a final report. Area 2 Curfew Violation, Underage Drinking, Wrongful Appropriation of Government Property, Failure to ID — Subject 1 was observed by MP during the hours of curfew. When asked for his/her ID, he/she provided one that belonged to Victim 1. Subject 1 was transported to the PMO were he/she rendered his/her real ID which showed he/she was under the legal age to consume alcohol. Subject 1 was administered a series of FSTs, which he/ she failed, and released to his/her unit. Victim 1 reported to the PMO and rendered a written sworn statement attesting to the above incident. July 16, Subject 1 returned to the PMO where he/ she was advised of his/her legal rights, which he/she waived, admitting to the above offenses except failure to ID. This is a final report. Area 3 Indecent Assault, Cruelty of Subordinates — Subject 1, who was waxing his/her floor while cleaning the barracks, requested assistance from Victim 1 and asked Victim 1 to look at something in an area of his/her room which was hidden from the hallway. Subject 1 then pinned Victim 1 to the wall of his/her barracks room and began to kiss Victim 1. Victim 1 physically resisted Subject 1 who then began to fondle and grope Victim 1’s breast and groin area. Victim 1 told Subject 1 that Victim 1 would scream if he/she didn’t let Victim 1 go. Subject 1 released Victim 1, who then exited the room. Subject 1 was interviewed and denied indecently assaulting Victim 1, stating that Victim 1 was in his/her room for approximately five minutes and helped hold the buffer’s electrical cord in the wall socket. Investigation continues. Traffic Accident with Injuries, Damage to Government Property, Failure to Maintain Control — Subject 1, while operating a Privately Owned Vehicle, struck Victim 1’s Government Owned Vehicle on the left rear bumper, causing Subject 1’s vehicle to spin into a guardrail, roll over and land on its roof. Damages to Subject 1’s vehicle consisted of dented right rear bumper, tail light and hood. Damages to Victim 1’s vehicle consisted of a crushed left front fender, rear door and rear fender, dents to the left front wheel rim, left front turn lights, left front door, right quarter panel, right front panel and right front door. Victim 1’s passenger, Victim 2, sustained injuries consisting of a bump over his/her left eyebrow and right ear. This is a final report.

See Vote, Page 13
Published by IMA-Korea Region
This Army newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The Morning Calm Weekly are not necessarily official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, Department of Defense, or Department of the Army. The editorial content of this weekly publication is the responsibility of the IMA-Korea Region, Public Affairs, APO AP 96205. Circulation: 9,500 SUBMISSIONS OR COMMENTS: Phone: DSN 738-3355 Fax: DSN 738-3356 E-mail: MorningCalmWeekly @korea.army.mil

Morning Calm
Installation Management Agency-Korea Region Office
Director/Publisher Public Affairs Officer Editor

Printed by Oriental Press Bldg. 1440, Yongsan Main Post
age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the printer shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. President: Charles Chong Commercial Advertising Telephone: 738-5005 723-4253 (02) 790-5795 Fax: E-mail: [email protected] Mail address: Oriental Press, PSC 450, Box 758, APO AP 96206-0758

Area I

Commander Public Affairs Officer CI Officer

Col. Forrest R. Newton Margaret Banish-Donaldson James F. Cunningham

Area II

Commander Public Affairs Officer CI Officer Staff Writer

Col. Ron Stephens Steve Davis David McNally Cpl. Lee Yang-won

Sustain, Support and Defend

Printed by Oriental Press, a private firm in no way connected Davis D. Tindoll Jr. with the U.S. Government, under exclusive written contract with John A. Nowell the Contracting CommandStaff Sgt. Mark Porter Korea. The civilian printer is responsible for commercial advertising. The appearance of Area III Commander Col. Michael J. Taliento Jr. advertising in this publication, Public Affairs Officer Susan Barkley including inserts or supplements, CI Officer F. Neil Neeley does not constitute endorsement by the U.S. Army or Oriental Press of the products or services Area IV advertised. Commander Col. Donald J. Hendrix Everything advertised in this Public Affairs Officer Kevin Jackson publication shall be made CI Officer Galen Putnam available for purchase, use or Staff Writer Steven Hoover patronage without regard to race, religion, gender, national origin,

The Morning Calm Weekly

supports Wolf Pack New AFN facility supports Wolf Pack
Korean Language, Culture Class Offered A Korean language and culture class will be offered at Seoul American High School on Yongsan Garrison. This class will meet daily from 10 to 11:30 a.m., weekdays thru Aug. 5. The class is open to anyone over the age of 15. The class is limited to 20 participants. Training Support Center Opens on Camp Henry Camp Henry Training Support Center will be open beginning Monday at Building T-1671 (old tennis court), Camp Henry. We will provide five Lane EST 2000 system and all Training Aids, Devices, Simulator and Simulation. Normal Operating hours are 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday thru Friday. For scheduling the EST 2000 and for information, call Chong Perry at 765-7267. Junior Golf Clinics Offered at Sung Nam Sung Nam Golf course will hold junior golf instructional clinics Aug. 7-11. All interested juniors ages 7-17 are invited to attend. The times will be 911 a.m. Monday thru Thursday at the Sung Nam Golf Course driving range and 7-10 a.m., Friday at Sung Nam on the golf course. All equipment and instruction from the golf course’s PGA of America staff will be provided at no charge. Call Jim Shaw or Jack Delaney at 736-3483 to sign up. Tips to Avoid Mail Theft The U.S. Postal Service handles 668 million pieces of mail every day. The vast majority of it arrives intact, but thieves get to some of it before delivery. To help guard against mail theft, here are some tips to protect your mail: Use the letter slots at your post office to mail letters, or give them to the clerk at the Finance window to process. Pick up your mail promptly after delivery. Don’t leave it in your mailbox overnight. Don’t send cash in the mail. Ask your bank for “secure” checks that can’t be altered. Tell your post office when you’ll be out of town, so they can hold your mail until you return. Report all mail theft to your local Installation Postal Officer. For information, contact the area postal authority. On Yongsan Garrison, call 723-3301; Camp Casey, 730-4767; Camp Humphreys, 7536563; Camp Walker, 764-4162.

News

http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly

July 28, 2006

3

By Senior Airman Stephen Collier
8th Fighter Wing Public Affairs

KUNSAN AIR BASE — American Forces Network personnel, along with 8th Fighter Wing leadership, cut the opening ribbon on their new facility July 19. The new AFN building, taking the place of Bldg. 607 located across from Dorm 609, provides more space and capability to get stories about the Wolf Pack out to listeners and viewers faster through digital technology and improved editing systems, according to Tech. Sgt. Pachari

SENIOR AIRMAN STEPHEN COLLIER

Col. Jeff “Wolf” Lofgren, 8th Fighter Wing commander, fields questions from airmen during the commander’s weekly radio show July 14.The cooperation and positive relationship between AFN Korea and Kunsan Air Base eventually led to a new facility for the military broadcasters.

Lutke, AFN Kunsan detachment 15 station chief. “To the Wolf Pack, it (the station) means more exposure of Airmen, Soldiers, Sailors and Marines who perform critical missions at Kunsan Air Base,” she said. For AFN listeners and viewers at Kunsan, the new station, according to AFN Korea’s engineering NCOIC Army Sgt. 1st Class James Eagleman, they’ll now have quicker access to current stories and programming on television as well as higher quality sounds and a larger variety of music to choose from. “The station received an upgraded technical control center while the radio studio was upgraded,” Sgt. Eagleman said. “Also, all [the] equipment used for broadcast of radio, television and editing has been replaced with new state-of-the-art equipment. These new capabilities will greatly benefit our 55,000-plus audience.” The new facility is the end result of the positive relationship built between the Air Force and AFN officials over the last few years. Lt. Col. Kenneth McDorman, AFN Korea commander, said AFN Korea has a solid working relationship with the Wolf Pack they were proud of. The Wolf Pack matched the amount of money allotted to AFN for this project. This type of cooperation is unprecedented,” he said. “This joint venture provides a better work environment for our members to produce the highest quality products. It will help better tell the combined stories in the peninsula and retell it to those in America and the world–wide audience.” For information on Wolf Pack coverage on AFN, visit their Web site at www.afnkorea.net.

No free credit monitoring for vets
By Beth Reece
Army News Service

CPL. LEE YANG-WON

Eighth U.S. Army Band Vocalist Sgt. Victor Trinidad sings July 21 at the Gunguk High School to help raise fund for flood victims.

8th U.S. Army Band performs for Korean high school
By Cpl. Lee Yang-won
Area II Public Affairs

Submitting to TMCW
Send Letters to the Editor, guest commentaries, story submissions and other items for inclusion in The Morning Calm Weekly to: [email protected] For all submitted items include at least one point of contact name and telephone number. For information, call 738-3355.

SEOUL — Nearly 1,800 Gunguk High School students “got in the groove” with the music of the 8th U.S. Army Band July 21. The high school coordinated the performance with the band to raise funds for recent flood victims in Gangwon Province. “The recent inundation has devastated some schools in that area,” said Gunguk High School Principal Oh Sung-sam. “We are planning to send funds to help impoverished schools to expedite recovery from flood ruins.” Oh said this was the second time the 8th U.S. Army Band has

performed for the school. “This is a good opportunity for our students to build friendships with U.S. Soldiers,” Oh said. “The visit will help both countries foster their mutual understandings toward each other. It’s a cross cultural experience.” The band captivated the crowd featuring well-known American pop songs, with some Korean songs as well. “Some of the songs were pretty familiar among the students,” said student Kang Jihyun. “They sing very well.” Students showed their appreciation at the end of the

WASHINGTON – The White House withdrew its funding request July 18 for free credit monitoring services for the 26.5 million veterans and family members whose information was thought to be impacted by the May 3 theft of a Department of Veterans Affairs computer. Veterans Affairs Secretary R. James Nicholson announced the recovery of the stolen computer June 29, eight days after he announced that the agency would provide one year of free credit monitoring to those whose Social Security numbers and birthdates were feared stolen. “The FBI has a high degree of confidence – based on the results of the forensic tests and other information gathered during the investigation – that the sensitive data files were not accessed or compromised,” said White House Budget Director Rob Portman in a letter to House Speaker J. Dennis Hastert. “ O n t h e b a s i s o f t h e F B I ’s analysis, the administration has concluded that credit monitoring services and the associated funding w i l l n o l o n g e r b e n e c e s s a r y, ” Portman added. Despite good news that the database was uncompromised, VA

See Band, Page 4

See Credit, Page 4

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July 28, 2006

The Morning Calm Weekly

PFC. KIM SANG PIL

Bradley Fighting Vehicle fires at the target, filling the air with smoke. The ultimate training for three Bradleys was Table XII - a platoon level exercise.

Tankers
When Soldiers of “First Tank Bn.” aren’t engaged in live-fire exercise, they conduct simulation training through the Unit Conduct of Fire Training which provides

from Page 1
the same interior environment of the area where the two crew members, a Bradley commander and a gunner do their job in the tracked vehicle.

Band
concert with a roar, requesting an encore. “I think the students’ reaction to the performance shows how this visit was a success,” said Area II Community Relations Officer An Chang-sin. “The band does a fantastic job as ambassadors for the American military community.” “It was awesome to perform in front of these kids,” said band member Sgt. Victor Trinidad. “Although we speak different languages, we still could communicate with each other through music.” At Right: Nearly 1,800 students enjoy an 8th U.S. Army Band performance July 21 at Gunguk High School.

from Page 3

CPL. LEE YANG-WON

Credit
continues soliciting bids from companies that provide data-breach analysis to ensure information is kept secure in the future, according to VA spokesman Matt Burns. “The VA has funds in its budget that can be used for this purpose,” Burns said, “and there will be no diminution in the quality of health care and other services provided to veterans as a result of this expenditure.” Since the theft, numerous personnel changes have taken place in the Office of Policy and Planning, where the breach occurred. VA has also hired a special advisor for information security and re-energized

from Page 3
its cyber security and privacy awareness training. A s F B I ’s “ h i g h d e g r e e o f confidence” is not 100 percent assurance that veterans’ personal information is safe, Army officials recommend Soldiers continue monitoring their credit reports. The Fair Credit Reporting Act r e q u i r e s e a c h o f t h e n a t i o n ’s consumer reporting companies – Equifax, Experian and Trans Union – to provide one free credit report a year to each citizen, per the individual’s request. To receive a free credit report, go to annualcreditreport.com or call (877) 322-8228.

Let The Morning Calm Weekly work for you
Have an item for The Morning Calm Weekly? Send story and photo submissions and other items to [email protected] For all submitted items include a point of contact name and telephone number. All items are subject to editing for content and style. For information, call 738-3355.

July 28, 2006

Page 5

DOL provides mission support for Area I
By Jim Cunningham
Area I Public Affairs

Frank La Rosa points out the area where an auction of vehicles will take place for Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office. There are 46 MTV vehicles that are being turned in. There they will be auctioned off by contracted vendors. “We requested that a site sale be conducted up here,” said La Rosa.

PHOTOS BY JIM CUNNINGHAM

Property in the unaccompanied personnel housing area is currently being separated out and recorded in the property books. “We are re-warehousing now so that we can start our 100 percent inventory. Now we are breaking it down,” La Rosa said.

CAMP CASTLE NORTH — Most everything needed to run the mission of the U.S. Army is contained and implemented through the Army’s Department of Logistics at Camp Castle. Everything from computers to weed eaters, vehicles of all sorts and microwave ovens, kitchen equipment for dining facilities, and right down to furniture Department of Defense civilian employees need to furnish their homes. “The volume of this type of property that flows through the property books of the DOL is tremendous,” said Frank La Rosa, general supply specialist supervisor for Area I. “There are several thousand items on the property books. We provide the installation support.” On the installation side, there are military and civilian customers, but basically installation support is mission support. “Mission support includes office furniture, automation and items that are required in getting the mission complete,” said Hugh Benner, Area I chief, supply and services division. “The organizational side, the table of distribution allowances, is where we provide equipment for unit level mission readiness, unit automation and equipment.” The consolidated property book office sees many types of customers during the week. “Customers come in for hand receipt adjustments for turning in furniture and other types of property,” LaRosa said. “Civilians come in and review what we have in the book for Army Family Housing; 120 of these customers. We also deliver furniture to them.” The CPBO also deals with organization customers, the 2nd Infantry Division and Area I. In the organization property book office, which covers one whole section on the site, they deal with a fuel property book system called Vehicle Information Link. “We control all the VIL keys for all the vehicles,” LaRosa said. “Bill keys are identification keys so when they go to fill up a government

vehicle with fuel, gas or diesel, the driver uses that key to credit the purchase to their account processing code.” The VIL key is an automated fuel processing system. Instead of doing a manual document register or cash p a y m e n t r e g i s t e r, t h e b i l l k e y automatically sends information by wire to the finance system where the account processing code is charged for the fuel purchase, Benner explained. To watch what goes on during the day at the CPBO facility on Camp Castle North one could easily be unaware of the sheer volume of property processed during the day. Customers are greeted at the welcome station, and provided computers to help them access their government work stations to retrieve any information needed in filling out their request for property. There is a waiting room to relax or have a few snacks, LaRosa said. But waiting time is rarely more than 10 minutes. It is behind the scenes where all the action takes place. “Recently, the CPBO received a lot of property just shoved in here in the warehouse,” La Rosa said. “We separate it and re-warehouse it so we can begin our 100 percent inventory. Now we are breaking it down.” Outside the building there are two rows of returned trucks and cars of all types. “We have 46 vehicles being turned in to DRMO,” La Rosa said. “These vehicles will be transported and auctioned off. We requested a site sale be conducted up here. They will make a contract with the vendors, and they will come up here to sell the cars and trucks.” Much of the new items received will go to other areas that have the need for them. Nothing lies around very long at the CPBO before it is placed with those who need the support. “There have been philosophers that say ‘an Army marches on its stomach,’ but here in Area I the case could be made that it marches on the efforts of the DOL,” La Rosa said. Email [email protected]

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July 28, 2006

Area I

The Morning Calm Weekly

Area I KSC Companies 56th Anniversary Area I KSC companies will hold their 56th anniversary activities today in Dongducheon’s main stadium at 10 a.m. For information, contact Company Commander Chon at 730-8438. USAG CRC Deactivation The United States Army Garrison CRC deactivation ceremony is planned for 10 a.m. Aug. 10. MWR Pool Tournaments Morale, Welfare and Recreation is holding two pool tournaments Saturday. A pool tournament will begin at 11 a.m. at Camp Casey Community Activity Center, and an 8-ball pool tournament will begin at 1 p.m. at the CRC CAC. MWR Patio Party MWR will hold a patio party and barbeque at Noon at Camp Hovey’s Hobson CAC. Powerlifting Championship The Warrior Country Powerlifting Championship is open to active-duty military personnel assigned or attached to camps throughout Warrior Country. The competition will be held at Camp Casey Carey Fitness Center. Weigh-ins will begin at 10 a.m. Saturday and the competition will begin at 1 p.m. Casey Town Hall Meeting The Camp Casey town hall meeting will be held from 2 to 5 p.m. Aug. 3 at Hanson Field House Gym. All are welcome. Mitchell’s Club closing Aug. 6-9 Mitchell’s Club will be closed Aug. 6-9 for renovation. The Club will open for business after 5 p.m. Aug. 10. Employment Readiness Program Resumix Class Camp Stanley will hold its Employment Readiness Program Resumix class from 1 to 3 p.m. today. For, information, call 730-3310 Financial Readiness Program Camp Casey Financial Readiness Program will hold its Personal Financial Readiness class at the Army Community Services building from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. today. For more information call: 730-3142/3108 Mongolian Barbecue at Mitchell’s Mitchell’s Club at CRC will feature Mongolian barbecue tonight from 5 to 8 p.m. The club will also feature a daily outdoor lunch buffet 11a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Monday thru Aug. 7. Reggie’s Steak & Shrimp Camp Stanley’s Reggie’s Club will feature New York strip steak and fried shrimp from11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. today.

Globetrotters entertain at Camp Casey
By Jim Cunningham
Area I Public Affairs

CAMP CASEY—Basketball fans in Area I were greatly entertained July 11 when the Harlem Globetrotters played at Camp Casey’s Carey Physical Fitness Center. “More than 900 fans were in the gymnasium,” said Jim Williams, Area I Morale, Welfare and Recreation sports director. The Globetrotters were at Camp Casey for one of their 12 exhibition games for MWR in three countries to J C perform before all four branches of the Harlem Globetrotters Michael Lee, signs autographs for fans after the games at Carey Armed Forces. “They came to Korea after Fitness Center on Camp Casey July 11, when they played before 900 fans. performing in Japan,” Williams said. confetti coming from the bucket. These Among the players who have been The ‘trotters are famous for their entertaining routines and more kept the Globetrotters are National Basketball comedy antics and routines that were crowd in laughter and very few Association greats Wilt “The Stilt” developed for the team by a legacy of concerned with the score of the game. Chamberlain and Reece “Goose” Tatum, hall-of-fame players that have “Who cares what the score is,” said as well as Marques Haynes, George performed for the ‘trotters dating back an excited fan. “What they can do with “Meadowlark” Lemon, and Nat 80 years. the ball and their comedy routines are “Sweetwater” Clifton. There are “They can entertain and play serious more interesting than the score.” honorary ‘trotters too, names such as basketball at the “The Harlem Pope John Paul II and Henry Kissinger same time,” one G l o b e t r o t t e r round out the list of honorary ‘trotters. “What they can do with the ball spectator said. military tours “This is a really nice gym and a great and their comedy routines are more have become a turnout from the fans. One man made “They are interesting than the score.” amazing with all tradition this a point to let me know that it’s really their skits and organization is good what we do for the children and ability to handle a basketball.” very proud of and looks forward to families all over the world. Getting They perform all the comedy every year,” said ‘Trotter Chairman comments like that helps me put things basketball routines made famous by the Mannie Jackson. “Having the into perspective and at the end of the ‘trotters of the past, such as the ‘bucket opportunity to entertain these men and day, is what really keeps us all going,” gag’ in which a player picks up a water women, stationed so far from their said Michael Lee, Harlem Globetrotter. bucket and throws it at a referee making families, is a privilege the players the spectators dodge only to find it is respect and appreciate.” E-mail [email protected]
IM UNNINGHAM

DTS travel authorizations made easy
By Jim Cunningham
Area I Public Affairs

CAMP RED CLOUD—When it comes time to go on temporary duty travel it is easier now for employees and administrators to create an authorization. “This training is to introduce the clerks in Area I and other employees to the new system developed by Northrop Grumman for the Defense Travel System,” said Donald Samuel, training specialist with Northrop Grumman. “There were a couple of trainers that came up from Northrop Grumman a couple of weeks ago to train the higher grade administrators.” Clerks in Area I received detailed training in the new DTS because they will be called upon to create the authorization documents and travel vouchers for employees going on temporary duty travel. “In Area I travelers will not be creating their own documents,” Samuel said. “This will be done by clerks or other designated trained employees in the offices, and that is the reason we are training today.” Most employees will not be doing their travel authorizations themselves, but the new DTS Web page makes it easy and convenient. “This new Web page and the new system makes it easier and convenient for everyone to do their own travel authorizations,” he said. “Some may prefer to do their own.”

The thought behind this training on the new system is for the clerks in each office to be well acquainted with the new system until everyone is comfortable with doing their own travel authorizations. The idea is to lighten the work load for TDY travelers, Samuel explained. “The system is set up for any traveler to be able to go on to the Web page and create their travel documents at any time,” Samuel said. “Eventually, everyone will do their own documents for travel; that’s the purpose of the system.” After training employees in Area I, Samuel will train people in Area II. “Area III and IV already have been trained, and they are using the system now,” he said. “Area II is next on our list. “We want everyone to know about the system, and give them the basics of the system so they will know how to get around on the Web site and become more comfortable with it. Today’s training is just like a starter kit,” Samuel said. “Even with the training today, we know you will not walk away and know everything about the system. We want to show you the basics, and we also want to show you that you can go online and get the training on the Web site.” To log on to the new DTS Web site and take this training online go to: http://www.defensetravel.osd.mil. E-mail [email protected]

The Morning Calm Weekly

Area I

http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly

July 28, 2006

7

JIM CUNNINGHAM

Sally Manuelita Hall, director of the USO at Camp Casey, begins the meeting before more than 50 foreign spouses at the USO on Camp Casey July 12.

U S O provides vital information for foreign spouses
By Jim Cunningham
Area I Public Affairs

CAMP CASEY—The USO held its monthly foreign spouses meeting July 12 to give vital information to foreign spouses about TRICARE, and new tutoring classes for a general equivalency diploma and scholastic assessment test, formerly the scholastic aptitude test. “This is very important information for the spouses because they need to know and understand the TRICARE system and how it works; how to get to a doctor when they need one and what to expect when they go to the clinic or hospital,” said Sally Manuelita Hall, director of the USO at Camp Casey. “This is a fellowship for the spouses where they can talk about different issues and get information vital to their understanding about American Army life and life in general in the United States,” she said. “They need to know that it is important to have an education, and how to get an education in the States and how to get started right here at Camp Casey.” The guest speaker was a nurse from the Camp Casey Medical Center. “Sally Hall invited me here to speak about medical

issues the spouses may have,” said Maj. Meryia Throop, nurse at Casey’s Troop Medical Center. “Part of every vision of every commander is taking care of family members, and it is a high priority for Soldiers and it is a high priority for us at the TMC.” Throop agrees that even though Area I is noncommand sponsored, the Army is taking good care of the Soldiers’ families. “We have the Urgent Care Clinic,” she said. We have TRICARE that’s coming and briefs for the family members with the town hall meetings as well. A lot of folks are interested in taking care of the family members and we do it to the best of our ability.” The volume of family members seen at the TMC is astounding. “On average I have one woman in labor ever week that comes into the clinic. About 10 percent of my workload in a month is family members,” Throop said. “It is very important the spouses understand military health care because part of the misunderstanding is in the frustrations one has with expectations when they come to the clinic.” Other speakers at the meeting were Capt. Issam

Bornales, 2-9 Infantry Regiment, and Amanda Hanley, a volunteer in education. “Hall invited me here to speak about the General Equivalency diploma program and to find times in the weekly calendar for Hanley, and to do coaching here at the USO,” Bornales said. “I am an immigrant myself, and I know the difficulty immigrants have if they don’t have the proper education. They will have a very tough time finding a job.” “I was asked to come here and talk about the GED and Scholastic Assessment Test classes and to do tutoring here at the USO,” Hanley said. “This is the most important thing for the spouses to learn.” Many of the spouses are thankful there is such a meeting at Camp Casey. “I came just to learn about TRICARE,” said Rhabora Marshal, a military spouse. “It is also important for me to gather information for all the other spouses who could not come today so they may find out about TRICARE.” “This meeting was so important to me ,” said Jo Ann Smith, another military spouse. “I had so many questions [about TRICARE] before that have been answered now because of this meeting.”

PBC offers opportunities for military families at CRC
By Jim Cunningham
Area I Public Affairs

CAMP RED CLOUD — The Pear Blossom Cottage offers many opportunities for military spouses and families at Camp Red Cloud. “We have more than 55 family members attend our events weekly at the PBC,” said Natalia Lyons, director of the CRC PBC. “This is a good place to spend family time; it is a good place to plan a birthday or going away party, or any number of family events, and a good place to learn about different cultures, U.S. culture and military life.” We have Russian, Filipino, Korean, Latvian, Japanese and American spouses,” Lyons said. “We have all different nationalities registered here. If a spouse comes to our cooking class every week she can learn so many

JIM CUNNINGHAM

The Pear Blossom Cottage at CRC often has birthdays and farewell parties and other celebrations. different dishes. Then she can go home and cook for her husband and family and share what she has learned here. “Also, we refer spouses to Army Community Service classes when they need something other than what we are offering here at the time. And, we refer family members to Army Family Team Building classes when we see the need or when they ask for them.” Many apartments off post do not have all the appliances and facilities military families need or washing machines or ovens in their kitchens. The PBC offers washing machines, a large kitchen and many other facilities.

Most military families seeking information for help in family crises or having questions regarding immigration or other situations, including taxes, go to the PBC. “We have an outreach program run by Minnie Richardson,” Lyons said. “She inquires and seeks out family members and spouses that may not know about the PBC and the facility and offers our help.” The CRC PBC welcomes all families, military and civilians, to come and use their facility when they need help or when they need a place to socialize and congregate. They welcome them. “You can write and you can talk about the PBC, but you must come here to see for yourself and take advantage of what we offer. It is not enough to write and tell about, one must see for oneself,” Lyons said.

E-mail [email protected]

July 28, 2006

Page 9

Access may be denied to safety violators
High-visibility retro-reflective vest Hyska further defined the retroreflective vest as being “of a bright color, such as orange.” By David McNally “A dark-colored vest is not as Area II Public Affairs visible,” he said. Under the new guidance, base YONGSAN GARRISON — Area II officials announced a stepped-up security guards will have the authority policy to deny installation access to to deny access if a person fails to people who fail to comply with comply. “We’re going to be training the community safety guidelines. security guards on what to look for,” Command Policy 10-1 covers community safety for joggers, said Area II Law and Order Officer bicycles, skateboards, skates, roller Ricky Oxendine. “They will have to blades, non-motorized vehicles, become familiar with all of the requirements under this revised motorcycles and mopeds. “The policy is generally the same, policy.” Oxendine said he is also working with the exception of the power to to get information signs enforce the all access p r o p e r “This is a step forward for posted at points to control wear of explain what safety p e r s o n a l installation safety.” protective —Jeff Hyska gear is required to enter the installation. equipment,” The policy letter also states that said Area II Safety Officer Jeff headphones or earphones and Hyska. The policy states for motorcycles handheld cellular telephones will not and mopeds, all personnel must wear: be used when operating motorcycles, A properly fastened approved helmet mopeds, bicycles, skateboards, that meets Department of skates, roller blades, or when running, jogging or walking. Transportation standards “This is a step forward for Eye protection (clear goggles or a installation safety,” Hyska said. face shield attached to the helmet) “This helps to provide a safer Full-fingered gloves environment.” Long trousers Long sleeve shirt or jacket Leather boots, or over the ankle shoes E-mail [email protected]

Security guards to review safety gear prior to admitting access to Area II installations

SGT. SEO KI-CHUL

Riders use the correct personal protective gear during a Yongsan motorcycle safety class.

Author draws 1,500 to prayer breakfast
By Pvt. Jung Jae-hoon
Area II Public Affairs

Korean employees learn about sexual harassment
By Cpl. Lee Yong-won
Area II Public Affairs

PVT. JUNG JAE-HOON

Author Rick Warren preaches to Area II community members at Collier Field House July 15.

YONGSAN GARRISON — Area II community members showed their love for the author of “The Purpose Driven Life,” as more than 1,500 people showed up at an Area II Prayer Breakfast July 15 at Collier Field House. Author Rick Warren is a best-selling Christian author, as well as the founder and senior pastor of Saddleback Church in Lake Forest, Calif. It is one of the largest churches in the United States. “The Purpose Driven Life” has sold over 25 million copies, making it the best-selling hardback in American history. The book has been translated into more than 50 languages. “His book was the reason I have started walking in God’s path, so I’m looking forward to seeing him in person,” said Pfc. Lee In-ho of the South Post Chapel. “In his book, you can achieve not only faith but entrepreneurship, management and leadership also.” The prayer breakfast started out with a choir singing cheerful hymns followed by the crowd singing with them. Rick Warren was singing hymns among the community members before finally taking the stage.

YONGSAN GARRISON — More than 100 Korean employees participated in the annual Prevention of Sexual Harassment training July 19 at the Multipurpose Training Facility. The training is a required course for all appropriated and non-appropriated fund local national employees. “They get a broad idea of what sexual harassment is,” said Installation Management Agency, Korea Region Office Equal Employment Opportunity Director Cho In-sook. “By going through this training, people can help themselves and co-workers from being sexually harassed.” Cho said the intense review is important because sexual harassment not only afflicts an individual but also significantly deters a whole organization. “Unfortunately, some Korean employees still have a biased view when it comes to judging others,” Cho said. “I think the most important thing is one’s attitude-shift toward the problem.” Employees watched Hangul version of sexual harassment prevention videos. The material

See Prayer Page 12 rayer,

See Harassment Page 12 Harassment,

10

July 28, 2006

http://area2.korea.army.mil

Area II Area II wishes ACS happy birthday
By David McNally
Area II Public Affairs

The Morning Calm Weekly

Women’s Equality Day Celebrate Area II Women's Equality Day with a luncheon 11:30 a.m. Tuesday at the Naija Ballroom, Dragon Hill Lodge. Summer Reading Program The final youth Summer Reading Program event is 11 a.m. Tuesday at the Yongsan Library. Listen to U.S. Forces Korea Commander Gen. B.B. Bell read to children. Free Concert The Crenshaw Elite Choir will perform 7 p.m. Thursday at the Seoul American High School Auditorium. Seoul USO The Rock, Paper, Scissors Tournament Finals will be held at the Dragon Hill Lodge Summer Concert that begins at 5 p.m. Saturday. Habitat for Humanity: USO will sponsor 35 servicemembers interested in building a home for the Cheonan community Sept. 23. USO is looking for volunteers now. Call for application forms, or visit http://www.uso.org/ korea. “United Through Reading” will be introduced Tuesday. The program allows servicemembers to keep in touch with home by videotaping book reading for a son, daughter, nephew, niece, brother or sister. The Good Neighbor Program Barbecue need volunteers for this event 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Thursday at the Collier Soccer Field. For information, call Charlotte Huntsman at 724-7781. Aikido Classes Aikido provides a way to keep fit and learn effective martial arts skills. Classes are ongoing 6:30-8 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays and Saturdays noon-1:30 p.m. at Trent Gymnasium. The classes cost $40 per month. For information, call 010-86714213. Touch of Sturgis Area II will host a “A Touch of Sturgis” 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Aug. 12 at the Yongsan Bowling Center. MWR will provide some refreshments and giveaways and the Yongsan Motorcycle Club will have more than 25 motorcycles on display. The group will also have booths to promote motorcycle safety. Computer Club The Seoul Computer Club will meet 24 p.m. Aug. 12 at the Seoul USO at Camp Kim. Commander’s Hotline Area II community members who have questions or comments for the Area II commander can voice them by emailing or by calling 738-3484. Area II Web site For more community notes, news and information, visit the Area II Web site at http://area2.korea.army.mil.

YONGSAN GARRISON — Area II community members gathered to celebrate the 41st birthday of Army Community Service July 21 during lunch. About 100 people turned out to hear speeches about ACS, sing happy birthday and cut a birthday cake. “They had a good time, received some new information about ACS programs that they may not have been aware of,” said Area II Volunteer Coordinator Joseph Gall. Community organizations like the bank and different ACS programs presented information booths with flyers and giveaways to help raise awareness. “Our ACS volunteers completely set up and organized the event,” Gall said. “We had $1,200 worth of food and it was all gone.” Gall said the birthday celebration was sponsored by the Yongsan Chapter NCOA, American Forces’ Spouses’ Club, Yongsan Chapter Sergeants Major Association, and Dragon Hill Lodge. Area II Morale, Welfare and Recreation

Army Family Team Building Coordinator Reta Mills sings happy birthday like Marilyn Monroe. .

See ACS Page 12 ACS,

Maj. Tanya Bradsher, a volunteer, Soldier and family member speaks July 21 at the Army Community Service birthday celebration.

PHOTOS

BY

DAVID MCNALLY

Tammy Duffy (left) and Sonnie Champigny applaud during the 41st birthday celebration of Army Community Service.

quarter Area II honors volunteers of the quarter
By Cpl. Lee Yang-won
Area II Public Affairs

YONGSAN GARRISON — More than 70 community members participated in the 2006 Volunteer of the Second Quarter Recognition Ceremony July 13, to show thanks to the volunteers at Army Community Services. The Adult Volunteer of the Quarter award went to Legal Office volunteer Maria Byford. The Youth Volunteer of the Quarter award was Youth Services volunteer Keisha Clark. Managers nominated the two volunteers and a selection committee made the choice based on the community impact of their volunteer work. “I still can’t believe I received this award,” said Clark. “I want to keep on helping people when I grow up.” Clark has carried out her role for Youth Services in the Teen Education

Area II Volunteer Coordinator Joseph Gall addresses the crowd during a ceremony July 13. and Career Program. In addition, she team spirit, charisma and leadership to volunteers with Yongsan Torch Clubs, make the activities a world-class and the Boys and Girls Clubs of America. See Volunteers Page 12 olunteers, “They say Keisha has the attitude,

CPL. LEE YANG-WON

Crenshaw Elite Choir to perform at Yongsan Garrison
Area II Public Affairs YONGSAN GARRISON — The Crenshaw Elite Choir will perform 7 p.m. Thursday at the Seoul American High School. Admission is free. The Los Angeles youth choir has visited Korea and performed for the U.S. military community many times. The choir director, Iris Stevenson, is the real life person portrayed by Actress Whoopi Goldberg in the movie “Sister Act II.”

C OURTESY PHOTO

The Morning Calm Weekly

By Pvt. Kim Sang-wook
Area II Public Affairs

11 Area II Newcomers learn about Korea
http://area2.korea.army.mil

July 28, 2006

Army Broadcasting Service Commander Col. Richard Breen (right) gives the AFN Korea guidon to Lt. Col. Michael Lawhorn July 21 at Trent Gymnasium.

DAVID MCNALLY

Kor orea AFN Korea gets new commander
Area II Public Affairs YONGSAN GARRISON — American Forces Network Korea is under new leadership. Army Broadcasting Service Commander Col. Richard Breen installed Lt. Col. Michael Lawhorn as the radio and television network commander July 21 at a Trent Gymanasium ceremony. Lawhorn most recently completed training with industry at Fox News. He was assigned to the 2nd Infantry Division as the public affairs officer from June 2004August 2005. The former commander, Lt. Col. Kenneth McDorman, will move to 8th U.S. Army Public Affairs.

YONGSAN GARRISON — More than 70 Area II newcomers gathered July 18 at the Yongsan Army Community Service to attend a bimonthly newcomers orientation. The orientation is a program to integrate newcomers to life in Korea. It gives information and guides the members to get to know the community better. “The newcomers orientation is a program for Soldiers, civilian workers and their families that are newly assigned to Korea,” said Area II ACS Orientation Coordinator Hyon Mendez. “To make the newcomers comfortable with the new place, we provide information about Area II and Korea.” During the three-day program, ACS provides detailed information about the community and facilities. “Military families move a lot around the world and it’s our job to make them comfortable and reduce inconvenience,” Mendez said. The residents focused on learning about Korean culture. A class featured the Korean language, as well as cultural differences between the United States and Korea. Newcomers also learned courtesies to communicate with Koreans. “This is my second time in Korea, and I actually volunteered to come back to Korea.” said newcomer Sgt. Paul Lee. “I really enjoyed learning Hangeul (Korean language). It was fun and interesting.” Lee said he plans to learn tae kwon do again. On the final day newcomers traveled off post to experience Korean culture firsthand. The students-turned-tourists visited the Blue House (the location of the Korean presidential office), Lotte World Amusement Park and the

Sgt. Paul Lee dresses in a Korean royal costume at the Lotte World Korean Folk Village July 19.

PVT. KIM SANG-WOOK

Korean Folk Museum. For lunch, they had a traditional Korean meal called “bibimbap.” On the way home, newcomers used the Seoul metropolitan Subway System instead of taking a bus to Yongsan Garrison. “Taking the newcomers off post and taking the subway was an opportunity for them to get friendly with Korean society and adjust quickly to Korea,” said ACS Relocation Program Manager Gina Mariano. The next newcomers orientation will be held in September. E-mail [email protected]

12

http://area2.korea.army.mil

July 28, 2006

Prayer
“Thank you for serving our country and for the warm hospitality,” Warren said. “We are here to pray for you and tell you about the meaning of life.” Everything has a meaning Warren said. “Even trees and the wind have meanings,” he said. “If you want to know the meaning of your life, go and ask God.” He also said life on earth is a preparation for eternity. So, everyone should not be so sad about their lives, because God is with them and he will

Area II
from Page 9
reward [them] after, if [they] get well prepared in this life. Rick Warren was elected by TIME magazine as one of the 15 world leaders who mattered most in 2004 and one of 100 most influential people in the world in 2005. “We were extremely happy with the turnout,” said Area II Chaplain Lt. Col. James King. “We want to thank all of the people who helped make the event a success.” E-mail [email protected]

The Morning Calm Weekly

Harassment
comprised a significant portion of the training. The presentation covered different types of sexual harassment and ways to stop the behavior. “The videos were really informative,” said 8th U.S. Army interpreter Kim Huiman. “The contents were issues we often neglect during our work time. It was a good reminder.” The training was initially an integrated program for both the U.S. community members and Korean employees. However, there was feedback from Korean employees that they had a hard time understanding the program in English.

from Page 9
Since last year, IMA-KORO EEO has been training Korean instructors and giving training in Korean language exclusively for Korean employees. “We have Korean instructors respectively for different divisions,” said instructor Steve Kang. “It has helped the Korean employees understand better.” Currently, 18th Medical Command, Dragon Hill Lodge, 176th Finance Command, Area II Morale, Welfare and Recreation, and Directorate of Logistics provide Korean instructors. E-mail [email protected]

ACS
had inflatable games for children, and Better Opportunities for Single and unaccompannied Soldiers had someone dressed as their mascot dog to entertain the crowds. The 8th U.S. Army Band also performed at the event. Maj. Tanya Bradsher, an 8th U.S. Army public affairs officer, was the guest speaker for the celebration. “We picked her because she is a volunteer, a Soldier and a family member,” Gall said. Bradsher told the gathering how ACS can transform a newcomer from helplessness to self reliance. The U.S. Army officially established ACS in 1965. The organization had the goal to establish a “centrally located, responsive and recognizable service to

from Page 10
provide information, assistance, and guidance to members of the Army community and meeting personal and family problems beyond the scope of their own resources,” Gall said. The organization reduces man-hours consumed by commanders, staff officers and individual Soldiers in seeking assistance to resolve problems, he said. “A byproduct of ACS is improved retention of military personnel and increasing career satisfaction,” he said. “Forty-one years later, the names of the programs and services may have changed, but the basic mission remains the same. I hope people understand ACS cares for their needs.” E-mail [email protected]

Volunteer
success,” said Area II Volunteer Coordinator Joseph Gall. “She gives 110 percent of herself, but I think she gives more.” Adult volunteer of the Quarter Maria Byford is a licensed attorney at law. She helps families with issues like divorce, separation, child custody cases, estate case and other legal issues. “Marie could easily set up her own practice and charge for her services,” Gall said. “But she does not, instead using her knowledge and training to help families through difficult times.” Area II received 67,800 hours

from Page 10
from the volunteers from April through June. These statistics mean 150 volunteers report to work every day. “I could stand here and go on forever about the wonders our volunteers have done to brighten our lives,” Gall said. “Their untiring dedication to the Area II community service directly contributed to our community of excellence.” The next volunteer of the quarter recognition ceremony will be in October. E-mail [email protected]

Visit the Area II Web site for more stories and community information

http://area2.korea.army.mil

The Morning Calm Weekly

July 28, 2006
http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly

1 3

Vote

from Page 2

address so they may contact you if there are problems processing your FPCA. Once you receive the absentee ballot, it should be completed and returned as soon as possible. Check with your unit VAO to determine your state’s deadline. How do I know what state is my legal residence? Generally, the legal voting residence for Servicemembers and their family is the state or territory where they last had physical presence and have the intent to return. Civilians abroad may vote in the state or territory where they last resided immediately prior to leaving the United States, even if their intent to return is uncertain. I don’t know enough about politics to vote. There’s an easy way to remedy this problem; get informed. Read the news, learn about the candidates. Check out Web sites like www.votesmart.org to get unbiased information about candidates, where they stand on the issues and their voting records. (Editor’s Note: Capt. Elisabeth Mahoney is the Area III senior voting assistance officer.She will be conducting a Voter Registration Drive 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at the Camp Humphreys’ Post Exchange.)

Below is a list of individual state primary and runoff election dates that have not yet been held for 2006. Voters from each state are encouraged to contact their unit Voting Assistance Officer and take steps to participate in future elections.

State

State Primary Completed Completed Aug. 1 Aug. 3 8-Aug. 8 8-Aug. 8 8-Aug. 8 8-Aug. 8 Aug. 15 Aug. 22 Aug. 22 Sept. 2 Sept. 5 Sept. 11 Sept. 12 Sept. 12 Sept. 12 Sept. 12 Sept. 12 Sept. 12 Sept. 12 Sept. 12 Sept. 12 Sept. 12 Sept. 19 Sept. 19 Sept. 23 Nov. 7

State Runoff Aug. 8 Aug. 22

Senate No No No Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes

Reps

Governor Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes No No No

Georgia Oklahoma Kansas Tennessee Colorado Connecticut Michigan Missouri Nevada Alaska Wyoming Guam Florida Virgin Islands Arizona Delaware District of Columbia Maryland Minnesota New Hampshire New York Rhode Island Vermont Wisconsin Massachusetts Washington Hawaii Louisiana American Samoa Puerto Rico

Nov. 7 Sept. 25 Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No

Dec. 9 Nov. 21

13 5 4 9 7 5 15 9 3 1 1 1 Delegate 25 1 Delegate 8 1 1 Delegate 8 8 2 29 2 1 8 10 9 2 7 1 Delegate

For the National General Election Nov. 7, individuals from all states should register and request an absentee ballot no later than Sept. 1. Completed absentee ballots must be postmarked and mailed not later than Oct. 15. For information, visit www.usfk.mil/usfk/index.html?/usfk/ vap/contents.html

14 http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly
July 28 - Aug. 4

July 28, 2006

The Morning Calm Weekly

X-Men: The Last Stand
PG-13

The DaVinci Code PG-13 Superman Returns
PG-13

Pirates of the Caribbean 2
PG-13

Pirates of the Caribbean 2
PG-13

Poseidon
PG-13

The DaVinci Code PG-13 No Show

Stick It
PG-13

Superman Returns
PG-13

Superman Returns
PG-13

Stick It
PG-13

No Show The DaVinci Code PG-13
Pirates of the Caribbean 2
PG-13

No Show The Omen
R

Pirates of the Caribbean 2
PG-13

Pirates of the Caribbean 2
PG-13

Pirates of the Caribbean 2
PG-13

The DaVinci Code PG-13
X-Men: The Last Stand
PG-13

The Omen
R

Poseidon
PG-13

Pirates of the Caribbean 2
PG-13

X-Men: The Last Stand
PG-13

RV
PG-13

Just My Luck
PG-13

You, Me & Dupree PG-13

You, Me & Dupree PG-13

Click
PG-13

No Show

No Show

No Show

The Omen
R

Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest – (Johnny Depp, Keira Knightley) Once again thrown into the world of the supernatural, Captain Jack Sparrow finds out that he owes a blood debt to the legendary Davey Jones, Captain of the ghostly Flying Dutchman. With time running out, Jack must find a way out of his debt or else be doomed to eternal damnation and servitude in the afterlife. And as if this weren’t enough, the Captain’s problems manage to wreck the wedding plans of a certain Will Turner and Elizabeth Swann, who are forced to join Jack on yet another misadventure.

Superman Returns – (Brandon Routh, Kate Bosworth) Following a mysterious absence of several years, the Man of Steel, Superman, comes back to Earth— but things have changed. While an old enemy plots to render him powerless once and for all, Superman faces the heartbreaking realization that the woman he loves, Lois Lane, has moved on with her life. Or has she? Superman’s bittersweet return challenges him to bridge the distance between them while finding a place in a society that has learned to survive without him.

The Da Vinci Code – (Tom Hanks, Jean Reno) The murder of a curator at the Louvre reveals a sinister plot to uncover a secret that has been protected since the days of Christ. Only the victim’s granddaughter and Robert Langdon, a famed symbologist, can untangle the clues he left behind. The duo become both suspects and detectives searching for not only the murderer but also the stunning secret of the ages he was charged to protect.

Just My Luck – (Lindsay Lohan, Chris Pine) Ashley is a young professional just out of college. She also happens to be the luckiest woman in the world, who has lived a super-charmed life and has always taken her good luck for granted. When she kisses a handsome stranger at a costume party, Ashley accidentally swaps her good fortune for his horribly bad luck, and her charmed life turns into a living hell.

You, Me & Dupree – (Owen Wilson, Kate Hudson) Carl and Molly Peterson are just starting their new life together — complete with a cute house, boring neighbors, stable jobs and the routines of newlywed existence. There’s just one unfortunate hitch in their perfectly constructed new world. And his name’s Dupree. Randy Dupree, Carl’s oldest friend and perpetual bachelor, has found himself with nowhere to go after being fired.

Click PG-13 The Break Up
PG-13

No Show The Break Up
PG-13

Stick It
PG-13

Poseidon
PG-13

No Show You, Me & Dupree PG-13 The Da Vinci Code PG-13 No Show
X-Men: The Last Stand
PG-13

No Show You, Me & Dupree PG-13 No Show You, Me & Dupree PG-13 The Da Vinci Code PG-13 X-Men: The Last Stand
PG-13

No Show The Omen
R

You, Me & Dupree PG-13 The Da Vinci Code PG-13 The Da Vinci Code PG-13 You, Me & Dupree PG-13 Akeelah and the Bee PG Rebound
PG

X-Men: The Last Stand
PG-13

X-Men: The Last Stand
PG-13

The Da Vinci Code PG-13 X-Men: The Last Stand
PG-13

You, Me & Dupree PG-13 X-Men: The Last Stand
PG-13

You, Me & Dupree PG-13 The Da Vinci Code PG-13 The Da Vinci Code PG-13 X-Men: The Last Stand
PG-13

X-Men: The Last Stand
PG-13

You, Me & Dupree PG-13 You, Me & Dupree PG-13
The Corpse Bride
PG

You, Me & Dupree PG-13 Akeelah and the Bee PG Rebound
PG

X-Men: The Last Stand
PG-13

Poseidon
PG-13

Poseidon
PG-13

Ice Age 2: The Meltdown PG

Ice Age 2: The Meltdown PG

Over the Hedge PG

Over the Hedge PG

The Morning Calm Weekly

July 28, 2006
http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly

Learning to trust in God’s plan when the way is unclear
By Chaplain (Capt.) Kim Eun S.
307th Signal Battalion

15

ometimes tragic things happen in our life that we don’t understand. Then, the first thing we want to do is to say “Why did God let this happen to me?” A couple of weeks ago I received an e-mail from a Soldier with whom I used to work. He wrote that his mother had a massive stroke all of a sudden and passed away. In his bitterness, the Soldier was asking me why his mother was taken so early, while he thought she was faithfully serving God. This kind of question is, in fact, one of the toughest questions that a chaplain can face in the ministry of Soldiers in the military. The reason is that even though suffering is such a large part of our experience, the Bible

S

seems to leave us with more questions than answers, and thus man’s questioning of God continues. However, God operates in sovereign and distinguishing grace in his dealings with us. Since we are not yet ready for all of the truth of God, it is not easy for us to understand why. Dr. Donald Grey Barnhouse illustrates the matter this way: A small boy has a pet dog which he loves very dearly. He plays with the dog every day. In fact, the dog sleeps beside him at night. One day the boy opens the door of the family garage just in time to see his father kill that dog. The fatal shot rings out and the boy screams and rushes toward the dog and the father catches the boy who kicks and screams against him. “You killed my dog. You killed my dog. I hate you. I

hate you,” said the boy. The father carries the boy into the house and says “My son, I will tell you why I had to kill him.” But the boy runs from his father, screaming “I hate you. I hate you. You killed my dog.” The boy continues to live in his father’s house, eating the meals that are provided by his father, wearing the clothes that are provided by his father, while constantly saying that he hates his father because his father killed his dog. When the boy grows up and begins to have some understanding of disease, he is given clippings that show that there had been an epidemic of rabies in his neighborhood that a mad dog had bitten several children and some of those children had died. He even finds a clipping which states that the mad dog bit several other dogs in the

neighborhood and it was necessary for the owners to destroy those pets. From his maturity the boy can look back on his childhood and see how warped his opinions of his father were. He had carried hatred of his father through the years because his father had crossed his childish will when he was four or five years old. Yet now he sees the evidence that his father was acting in wisdom and love, and that his pet dog might have bitten him and caused his own death. Ever since man came into existence, we have always felt it necessary to question God. However, I think our Lord’s words to Simon Peter ought to be written inside the front cover of our Bible. Those words are found in John 13:7, Jesus replied “You don’t understand now why I am doing it; someday you will.”

Area IV Worship Services
Protestant
Collective Sunday 10 a.m. Camp Carroll 10:30 a.m. Camp Henry 10:30 a.m. Camp Walker 12:45 p.m. Camp Walker Camp Carroll Korean Korean Church of Christ Collective Friday 5 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. Tuesday 7 p.m. Camp Walker Camp Walker Camp Carroll Camp Carroll Mass Mass

Catholic
Sunday 9 a.m. Saturday Camp Walker Camp Walker 11:45 a.m. Camp Carroll

Wednesday 6:30 p.m. Camp Walker
For additional information, contact the Area IV Chaplain’s Office at 764-5455.

Praise & Worship Sunday 6:30 p.m. Camp Walker

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16 http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly
By Pfc. Amanda Merfeld
Second Infantry Division Public Affairs

July 28, 2006

The Morning Calm Weekly

McCoy breaks gender barrier, joins division color guard
honor and to show pride,” McCoy said. McCoy wanted to take part in something bigger than herself, and to represent her unit in one of the most visible ways that she knew how. It wasn’t about being a female for McCoy, it was about service. “It’s pride,” McCoy said. “It’s knowing that you stand out from everyone else at a change of command ceremony. It’s knowing that everyone out there is looking at you holding on to something very precious to the military. You have your country’s flag and the division colors, depending on the ceremony.” A position on the color guard team is one of honor, due to the fact that they are the individuals who present and carry the symbols of their unit or company, as well as their branch of the military and national flag. “You’re holding on to history, of everything that the battalion has been through over many years. You’re … part of history in the making,” McCoy said. “I think that when females get the opportunity to take advantage of making history or taking part of anything that is not the norm for a female Soldier, I think that they should speak up and do it,” McCoy said.

CAMP RED CLOUD – Women in the military have been making firsts for years, paving the way for other females. From the first to serve to the first pilots, females have slowly but surely edged their way into military history. Staff Sgt. Stephanie McCoy, the non-commissioned officer in charge of the analysis control element’s collection management team on Camp Red Cloud, was the first woman to take part in the 2nd Infantry Division Color Guard team. The Color Guard in the Army has been dominated by the male populous, leaving it one of the last frontiers to be occupied by women. McCoy joined the Army in 1999, and arrived in Korea in December 2005. She volunteered for the Division Color Guard team for the Special Troops Battalion change of command ceremony for Lt. Col. Leslie Brown, when McCoy’s company asked for volunteers over six feet tall. “The color guard is the sergeant major’s baby. You are a reflection of him and you are a reflection of the division. People look at you to show

YU HU SON

Staff Sgt. Stephanie McCoy, right, was the first female in the 2ID Color Guard team.

18 http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly

July 28, 2006

The Morning Calm Weekly

Field Turf fields a hit with players
By Mike Mooney
Area III MWR Marketing

Battle of the Bands The Battle of the Bands contest is set to take place at Moyer Community Services Center at 7 p.m. Saturday. Pick up an entry form at your local CAC or call 723-8502 for information. The contest is sponsored by MWR. The winners may be eligible to advance to the All-Army competition. May the best band win! Junior Golf Clinics Offered at Sung Nam Sung Nam Golf course will hold junior golf instructional clinics Aug. 7-11. All interested juniors ages 7-17 are invited to attend. The times will be 9-11 a.m. Monday thru Thursday at the Sung Nam Golf Course driving range and 710 a.m., Friday at Sung Nam on the golf course. All equipment and instruction from the golf course’s PGA of America staff will be provided at no charge. Call Jim Shaw or Jack Delaney at 736-3483 to sign up. Korean Language, Culture Classes Offered A Korean language and culture class will be offered at Seoul American High School. This class will meet daily from 10 to 11:30 a.m., weekdays thru Aug. 5. The class is open to anyone over the age of 15. The class is limited to 20 participants. Weekend Bingo at Uptown Lounge Be a winner at Bingo at the Main Post Club’s Uptown Lounge. Every Saturday and Sunday, doors open at 11 a.m. and early games begins at 12:30 p.m. Over $6,750 in prize money is given away every weekend, including $2,500 and $5,000 jackpots. For information, call the MWR club manager at 723-8785. Area II Pool League The Area II Pool League is seeking new members. The group meets at 7 p.m. each Tuesday at the Main Post Club, Harvey’s Lounge and the Navy Club -all on Yongsan Garrison. Membership is open to ID cardholders, family members, retirees, Department of Defense civilians or contractors and individuals sponsored by ID cardholders. for information, call Brent Abare at 7233691 or e-mail [email protected] TMCW Submissions To have an event featured in The Morning Calm Weekly, e-mail all pertinent information to [email protected] Submissions should include the basic who, what, when and where information regarding the event, and a point of contact name and telephone number. For information, call 738-3355.

CAMP HUMPHREYS – The final grade is in on the new Field Turf softball fields at Camp Humphreys, and it’s a solid “A.” Citing “safety, the ability to play in all weather, true bounces and comfort,” Soldiers from the eight teams in the Camp Humphreys intramural playoffs gave the new artificial turf field high grades across the board. Of the 31 Soldiers and 5 umpires involved in the survey, only one gave the new fields a “D,” saying the “fields are great but they are not grass.” Twenty-two of the 31 players and all umpires gave the fields a solid “A” rating. Morale, Welfare and Recreation installed the new Field Turf surface this past year on two softball fields and one combined Flag Football/Soccer/Rugby field at Camp Humphreys’ Soldier’s Park – the installation’s primary sports complex. The $2.3 million Non Appropriated Fund Major Construction project was built entirely with in-country Soldier dollars. After more that 225 games, everyone from commanders to sports officials, from umpires to players were singing the praise of the new surface. “It shouldn’t come as a surprise,” said Area III Community Recreation Division Chief Jim Howell, who was sports director during construction of the fields. “After all, this is the same surface the National Football League selected for the Super Bowl. It’s not like the old artificial turfs which were nothing more than plastic grass over blacktop or cement.

PHOTOS

BY

MIKE MOONEY

The carpeted base paths and home plate area eliminate dust and dirt, making for easier calls on chose plays at plate and on the base paths.

Camp Humphreys’ softball fields are getting rave reviews since the installation of Field Turf surfacing. This stuff looks like grass, feels like “It’s much easier to make the call grass and is on a super-soft surface.” now,” said umpire Tim Szuszka. Field Turf is laid over a rubberized “Instead of a cloud of dust and a ton of surface complete with drainage. The dirt when someone slides into a base or surface itself is “spongy” and the plate, you have a clear view with comfortable to play on. Even the base nothing more than a few rubber pellets paths and the home plate areas are in the way. It’s great.” covered in carpet, meaning there is no Umpire James Reid said the new dirt inside the playing fields. fields are also “safer and far more “The commanders are especially comfortable on your feet and joints. happy because we have just about “I umpired all day in the rain when eliminated all types of sports injuries,” you would have stopped play because Howell said. “In past years, we have of the conditions,” Reid said. “Instead, always had Soldiers lose duty time I was comfortable – except for the wet because of injuries suffered during — and the playing conditions remained softball games. There were a lot of safe. That’s the most important thing. jammed ankles and knees, as well as These fields are much safer that regular cuts and abrasions. playing surfaces.” “This year, we had zero injuries that Camp Humphreys Post-Level Men’s resulted in lost duty time. That fact alone Coach Marcus Lux said his players “love saved the government thousands of the new surface. It’s not like the old dollars.” artificial turf that was hard and hot. This Howell said that the original plans had surface is much more comfortable and called for dirt around the bases and on doesn’t seem to get hot. It looks like the plate, but that the Field Turf company grass. Of course, it doesn’t smell like recommended the carpeting instead. grass and you never get that freshly cut “They said that their studies had smell. But it’s great. indicated the carpeted base paths and “We’re unbeaten at home this year, home plate area would result in longer and I really think the turf has given us a life and even fewer injuries. I was against home-field advantage.” it at first, but I have to agree.” “The best thing about the fields,” said Without dirt and dust, even umpires another umpire “is that you don’t have have fallen in love with the field. to shine your shoes. That and it’s safe.”

Korea USA basketball team coming to Korea
Korean Region MWR YONGSAN GARRISON – The USA Basketball Men’s National Team, scheduled to visit Seoul as participants in the World Basketball Challenge 2006, will sponsor Hoops for Troops during their time in the Republic of Korea, Aug. 1116. The World Basketball Challenge, Aug. 11-15 at Jamsil Olympic Gymnasium, features teams from Italy, Turkey and Lithuania, in addition to the USA squad and the host Republic of Korea team. The U.S. team will play two exhibition games, taking on Lithuania at 4 p.m., Aug. 13, and squaring off against Korea at 3 p.m., Aug. 15. The players have purchased 1,000 tickets for each of their games, donating them for active-duty servicemembers stationed here. The tickets will be divided among all Areas and components within U.S. Forces Korea. More information on ticket distribution is available through servicemember chains of command. The team will conduct practice, open to ID cardholders, from 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Aug. 14 at Collier Field House here, and again from 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Aug. 16 at Carey Field House, Camp Casey. USA Basketball Men’s National team, led by Duke University head coach Mike Krzyzewski, is currently conducting training camp in Las Vegas, in preparation for stops in China and Korea, before moving on to Japan for the 2006 FIBA Men’s World Championship, Aug. 19-Sept. 2. The projected 15-player roster slated to travel to Korea includes Carmelo Antony, Gilbert Arenas, Elton Brand, Dwight Howard, LeBron James, Chris Paul, Amare Stoudemire, Dwyane Wade and Kirk Hinrich.

July 28, 2006

Page 21

Area III community speaks up at town hall, housing meetings
Area III Public Affairs Soldiers, civilians, family members and retirees had opportunities to talk to Area III Commander, Col. Michael J. Taliento Jr. when he convened two meetings last week at Camp Humphreys to talk with Area III personnel. The first meeting, the quarterly town hall, was held in the Community Activity Center July 18 and was open to all Area III personnel. The second meeting, held July 20, was much smaller in scope and attendance because it was only for residents of Army Family Housing. Speaking to an audience of approximately 125 at the Area III meeting, Taliento outlined the progress made since the last town hall, April 17. Matinee movies during the summer and Army and Air Force Exchange Service jumbo taxis were among the successes. The automatic doors at the Post Exchange main store continue to be a problem, but AAFES reports they are still working that issue. Taliento outlined a list of other accomplishments recently completed. They included the resurfaced fields at Soldier’s Park and the batting cages, the new shoppette and Charley’s Steakery near MP Hill, a new gaming room with 10 computers in the Community Activity Center, and the imminent completion of the north campus for Humphreys American Elementary School. Things to look forward to include up to four more ATMs and possibly the first drive-up ATM in Korea, a teen shuttle bus to Osan, and the opening of the new barracks and dining facility at

ACS celebrates birthday, honors volunteers
Area III Public Affairs CAMP HUMPHREYS – Hundreds gathered here July 21 to help the Army Community Service honor its volunteers of the quarter and to celebrate its 41st birthday. Dave Watson, director, Area IV Morale, Welfare and Recreation, said volunteers have made immeasurable contributions to the installation by donating their time and skills. The Military Unit Volunteer of the Quarter was Company B, 4th Battalion,2nd Combat Aviation Brigade. “The Soldiers in my company have given of their time and made it a priority,” declared Capt. Carrie A. Bruhl, Company B commander. “One of them has volunteered over 800 hours.” Bruhl attributed the grassroots support to a mixture of “command emphasis” and “showing what (one) can gain from volunteering.” Bravo’s sister company, Delta, has also contributed many hours of volunteer work, said 1st Sgt. Drury M. Puckett III. “The group in the office talked about it and did it on our own initiative,” he said. Becca Martin, named Civilian/Family Member Volunteer of the Quarter, is

COURTESY PHOTO

Lt. Col. Deborah A. Myers, commander, 3rd Military Intelligence Battalion, asks a question about Physical Training run routes during the Area III town hall meeting held July 18 Zoeckler Station. New issues introduced by the audience included re-evaluating the Physical Training run route and the requirement to have a STAR Card in order to have the AFN decoder. Steven Ryles, exchange business manager, advised that this is an AFN, not an AAFES, requirement. The next town hall is scheduled for Oct. 17. New pet policy for Family Housing The second town hall of the week, held July 20 in Army Family Housing, was to specifically address family housing issues. After reviewing issues from the previous meeting, held April 20, Joan M. Bradford, Directorate of Public Works housing chief, turned the attention to new issues, one of which was the new Area III pet policy for family housing. The policy, effective as of July 11, defines domestic pets as dogs, cats, small caged furry animals such as guinea pigs, rabbits and hamsters, noncarnivorous birds, and aquarium fish or turtles. Pet ownership in enlisted barracks is forbidden. Residents of senior enlisted and officer quarters may request permission to have a small aquarium not to exceed 20 gallons. Residents of family housing with a yard may have up to two dogs or cats, or up to four small caged animals or birds

See Meetings, Page 22

See ACS, Page 23

Army fitness program targets civilian health
By Jerry M. Gutlon
Area III Public Affairs

CAMP HUMPHREYS – Better health promotes better work habits and the Department of the Army is recognizing that fact by instituting a unique program to promote better living. Sylvia Eckman, Area III health promotion coordinator, is looking for participants in the new endeavor she’s calling “Targeting Fitness.” “It’s a six-month-long course that’s comprised of three hours per week of unsupervised exercise and two classes per month on well-living,” Eckman said. What makes it unique, she added, is that it’s open to virtually everyone with a DA connection. “Basically, it’s open to everyone, with the approval of their supervisor (if applicable), and the

three hours of exercise can be done during duty hours. So they’ll pay you to work out.” The program is also available for dependents and Korean employees, as long as they meet the criteria and follow its requirements. “The program is a one-time thing,” Eckman noted. The sign-up period will run from Sept. 1-15, and classes begin Sept. 18. The course will conclude March 16, and has the blessings of Area III Commander, Col. Michael J. Taliento Jr. It’s also been endorsed by the Department of Defense, the Surgeon General, the American Medical Association and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Eckman said classes will include such topics as cardiovascular health, well-living, nutrition, flexibility, aerobics, strength training, fad diets, spiritual fitness, stress management and weight control. “With better health, an employee will generally be more productive, miss less work and have better

morale,” she said. A registered nurse for 16 years, Eckman said she’s enjoyed her job in the year she’s served here. “This is the first time I’ve done health promotions, but I like it,” she enthused. “When you see people succeed – whether it’s to quit smoking or lose weight – it’s really gratifying.” Although the exercise end of the program will be conducted on the honor system, Eckman said participants will be disqualified if they are found to be falsifying their exercise recordkeeping. Exercising must be done on the installation, she added. There are several prerequisites necessary before registering for the program, noted Eckman. All participants must have a cholesterol screening within the past 90 days, and must take a fitness test before starting the program. Eckman said the fitness test will consist of a cardiovascular test, a strength

See Fitness, Page 22

July 28, 2006 22 http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly

Flaming Dragon competes for Connelly Award - again
Splish ‘n’ Splash Waterpark opens The pool section of the Splish ‘n’ Splash waterpark is scheduled to open Tuesday. Hours of operation will be 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily. Voter Registration Drive Register to vote at the Camp Humphreys Post Exchange from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. Saturday. For information, call 753-8047. Funded Legal Education Program The Army Funded Legal Education Program is accepting applications from active-duty commissioned officers in the rank of second lieutenant through captain to attend law school beginning Fall 2007. Area III personnel should contact Capt. Mahoney at 753-8047 for information. . Parents’ Night Out Parents – take time to reconnect with each other. Free child care for active-duty and Department of Defense ID cardholders sponsored by Family Advocacy, from 69 p.m. Aug. 5. All children must be registered in advance. No drop-in care will be accepted. Call 753-6252 or 7538448 to register your child. BOSS All-Nighter Get ready for the next BOSS all-nighter Aug. 12. Contact 011-9688-0194 for details. Dog Days 5K Run Don’t let the summer heat get you down. The 5K run starts at 8 a.m. Aug. 12. Registration begins at 7 a.m. For information, call 753-8810. Ops Desk Phone Number The Camp Humphreys Operations Desk is now located in Building 1280. The new telephone number for the CHOD is 754-6111. From a commercial line, call (031) 619-6111. New Commercial Prefix Telephone numbers in buildings from the main gate to and including all of Zoeckler Station have a new commercial prefix. Callers dialing from off-post should call (031) 619-XXXX. Youth Soccer Registrations Registration will be held Aug. 1-31 at the Charles Gilliland Youth Center. Cost is $45 for all ages. There is a 20 percent discount for families with more than one child participating. Contact 7535051 for information. Youth Services Sports Clinics National Alliance for Youth Sports coaches clinics for soccer. The first is July 26 and again Aug. 16. Both classes will be held at the Charles Gilliland Youth Center, Bldg. 570, beginning at 6:30 p.m. All volunteer youth soccer coaches must attend one of these classes prior to coaching a team. Call 753-5051 for information.

Area III

The Morning Calm Weekly

By Jerry M. Gutlon
Area III Public Affairs

CAMP HUMPHREYS – Food fit for a king is on the menu seven days a week, 365 days a year at Zoeckler Station’s Flaming Dragon Dining Facility here, again a finalist for the Philip A. Connelly Excellence in Food Service Awards for the U.S. Army in Korea. The facility, a winner of more than a half dozen Connelly Awards in both the small and large garrison categories, was again selected as the best dining facility in Area III, undergoing intense scrutiny July 20 by a team of inspectors from the Installation Management Agency - Korea Region Office. The nationwide results of the competition were expected to be released this week. The two winners will then be judged in a worldwide competition. “They are considered the best in Area III,” explained Chief Warrant Officer Haesoo Kim, KORO garrison food program director, the senior inspector. “Besides the usual, we consider attitude, command emphasis, motivation and how they feed the Soldiers.” From all appearances, they feed the Soldiers well. The July 20 lunch menu featured baked, stuffed fish, Yankee pot roast and capon. That was in addition to the obligatory fried chicken and short-order staples such as hamburgers and hot dogs. Sgt. 1st Class Wanda M. Pitts, dining facility manager, a member of Headquarters and Operations Company, 527th Military Intelligence Battalion, said her staff of 48 has P J M. G Hung Yo-son chops parsley while been preparing for the preparing garnish for several main inspection for about a courses at the Flaming Dragon Dining month, and said the Facility. Located at Camp nomination came as no Humphreys, the facility was selected surprise. “We were expecting as the best mess in Area III. it,” Pitts said. “We set ourselves high goals and go after them. And if we don’t win, at least we’d know we did everything we could to win.” As Pitts spoke, her kitchen crew worked feverishly preparing a variety of meals catering to a variety of tastes.
HOTOS BY ERRY UTLON

Soup’s on! Sgt. 1st Class Wanda M. Pitts, Spc. Tian L. Garcia, Spc. Bryce W. Christensen and Staff Sgt. Bronson A. Jacoby taste test the pot roast they served during the Flaming Dragon Dining Facility’s evaluation in pursuit of a Philip A. Connelly Excellence in Food Service Award. “I attribute the nomination to teamwork,” said shift Sgt. Rachel L. Lopez, Company A, 532nd MI Bn. “We work hard and we play hard. But our selection recognizes us for our excellence in our abilities in the field of culinary arts.” Master Sgt. Damita Jo Ellis, 501st Military Intelligence Brigade food adviser, said the facility staff deserves every accolade of the many they’ve collected. “They’re very highly motivated Soldiers,” she declared. “They have outstanding leaders and great esprit de corps. They’re Soldiers who “ It’s an honor to be want to go to the next recognized like this, but level and win the we’re just doing our jobs.” Connelly Award for the entire Sgt. Robert A. Gayle, (Department of the Company A, 532nd MI Battalion Army).” Ellis said food service is one of the most difficult missions in the military. “It’s a seven-day-a-week, 365-day-a-year mission,” Ellis explained. “Food is so important to everybody. “Good food breeds good morale. It helps the Soldiers they serve accomplish their missions.” Preparing gravy for the pot roast, Sgt. Robert A. Gayle, Co. A, 532nd MI Bn., said he and his fellow food service workers aren’t sweating the evaluation. “There’s no pressure,” he insisted. “We do this every day. It’s an honor to be recognized like this, but we’re just doing our jobs.”

Meetings
and/or an aquarium not to exceed 50 gallons. Residents of family quarters that do not have a private yard may own one cat, up to four small caged animals or birds and/or an aquarium not to exceed 50 gallons. Dog ownership is restricted to families that had a dog in Korea prior to April 2005. No new dogs are allowed in these quarters. Residents were updated on the status of AFH phases II and III by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Far East District staff, and were advised that the underground parking garage will open sometime in September. Taliento discussed many upcoming changes with residents and listened to their concerns regarding traffic control and safety for their children.

from Page 21
The next meeting will be in three months, but the date has not been determined yet.

Fitness

from Page 21

In response to community requests at past town hall meetings Camp Humphreys Post Exchange now offers jumbo taxis ideal for transporting groups of Soldiers during highdemand hours.

COURTESY PHOTO

evaluation, a body fat screening and a weight test. A current certification from each participant’s personal physician is also required. All preliminary medical screenings for non-active duty personnel are the financial responsibility of the prospective participant. Participants will be provided with an evaluation at the conclusion of the program which, Eckman said, will be conducted every six months. “Obesity is a major health problem around the world and this is a great way to combat it,” Eckman said.

The Morning Calm Weekly

Winners picked in’Distinguished Dog’ contest
Area III MWR Marketing
Special to The Morning Calm Weekly

Area III

http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly

July 28, 2006

23

CAMP HUMPHREYS – And the winners are … “Cricket,” a white boxer belonging to 1 st Lt. Melanie Finley, a Soldier serving at Osan Air Base; and “Zeus,” a Yorkie belonging to Camp Humphreys’ couple Matt and Diana Reynolds. They were the big winners in the Area III Distinguished Dog Contest, hosted by Area III Morale, Welfare and Recreation to salute the Dog Days of Summer in August. Cricket will grace the front cover of the “Leisure Informer” while Zeus will appear on the cover of the monthly “Youth Newsletter.” In addition, the two owners will receive a coupon good for a free steak dinner at the Alaska Mining Co. The selected steak will have to include a bone under contest rules. “It was a close contest, with almost 100 photos entered,” said Area III MWR Marketing Chief Mike Mooney. “The photos were spread on my living room floor, with the judges then sorting through the entries before selecting the two cover dogs. I want to thank the judges for their hard work – especially Hobo who took his duties very seriously.” Originally, Mooney’s four dogs — Hobo, Jumping Jack, Dong II and Sophia — were supposed to judge the contest. But the two French (poodle) judges got caught in a Milk Bone scandal and were disqualified from the panel.

Hobo picks Cricket, a white boxer belonging to 1st Lt. Melanie Finley as the Distinguished Dog who be featured on the cover of the August MWR Leisure Informer. “Neither Sophia nor Dong II will explain where the box of Milk Bones came from,” Mooney said. “It’s pretty obvious they had accepted a bribe from someone.” So the judging was left up to Hobo, a Shitsu, and Jumping Jack, a min-pin. “Being a puppy, Jumping Jack saw all the pictures spread on the floor and thought they

MIKE MOONEY

were there for something else,” Mooney said. “So he gave them the ‘wet look’ which pretty much left the judging up to Hobo.” Hobo’s first choice of a winner was a picture of himself. However, under contest rules, MWR employees and family members of MWR employees are not eligible to win the major prize. Sent back to the pile, he first picked “Cricket” and then chose “Zeus” as the winners. In addition, Hobo selected a collection of other entrants for the back covers of the two magazines. Owners of those dogs will receive a 2-for-1 Steak Dinner Coupon from the Alaska Mining Co. Both the “Leisure Informer” and “Youth Newsletter” will be published by the first of August and will be available at the Post Exchange, commissary and Area III MWR facilities. When asked what he’s going to do for an encore, Mooney said Area III will honor cats in the October Leisure Informer. “It’s against my better judgment, but cat owners are threatening to boycott Area III MWR facilities,” Mooney said. “I guess we’ll have to give away some fish dinners to keep them happy. We picked October because the holiday cats are most closely associated with is Halloween.” Cat owners may e-mail entries to Mooney at [email protected]

Twice as Nice

ACS
involved with the Army Family Action Program and the Army Family Team Building Program. She also serves as the leader of the Family Readiness Group supporting the 3rd Military Intelligence Brigade. “It’s a lot of fun,” she said. “It gets you out into the community and helps you to meet people. And you’re helping Soldiers and their families.” Capt. Melissa K. Woodward, Company C, 168th Medical Battalion, invested 161 hours

from Page 21
into her ACS volunteer service between January and June, and was named ACS “Soldier of the Year” for her volunteer efforts as a Girl Scout leader. Woodward was one of 10 Soldiers who received Meritorious Service Medals for their volunteer corps service. “I really have a good time helping people,” she said. “It’s fun.” Samantha Elkins received the award for youth volunteer of the quarter.

Samantha Elkins was recognized twice last week for her volunteer work at Camp Humphreys. She received the USFK 2006 Youth of the Year award during the Camp Humphreys town hall meeting July 18. The award was given for her over 300 hours volunteering with chapel programs and as the Camp Humphreys representative at various youth leadership forums on the peninsula. Elkins picked up her second award of the week July 21 during the Army Community Service 41st birthday and Volunteer of the Quarter celebration. She was named Youth Volunteer of the Quarter by Emily Philippe, volunteer coordinator.

COURTESY PHOTO

SUSAN BARKLEY

Dave Watson, director, Are III Morale, Welfare and Recreation, congratulates Carrie A. Bruhl, commander, Company B, 4th Battalion, 2nd Combat Aviation Brigade and 1st Sgt. James E. Johnson, after their company was named military unit of the quarter during the ACS 41st birthday celebration held at Camp Humphreys July 21.

July 28, 2006

Page 25

AFSB-NEA breaks ground on new facility
State-of-the-art maintenance building to help with readiness
By Steven Hoover
Area IV Public Affairs

CAMP CARROLL – A groundbreaking ceremony for a $9.7 million, 53,000-square-foot state-of-the-art vehicle maintenance facility was held here Wednesday. Army Field Support Battalion – North East Asia personnel joined officials from Army Field Support Brigade Korea, Corps of Engineers Far East District, various Area IV Support Activity organizations and contractor Namwha Construction Company, Ltd., to cut the ribbon and turn the first ceremonial shovel of earth. AFSB-NEA’s mission is combat readiness and accountability for all U.S. Army pre-positioned stocks assets in the Pacific Theater, including those here. The history of AFSB-NEA began with the 1994 establishment of Army War Reserve Management Cell-4 to manage U.S. Army war reserve stocks. The cell began operating here in 1994 with personnel on duty from the continental

This is an artists rendition of the finished 53,000-square-foot state-of-the-art vehicle maintenance facility which will be used by Army Field Support Battalion-North East Asia personnel to keep vehicles within the U.S. Army pre-positioned stocks at a high state of readiness. The facility is scheduled for a November 2007 completion. United States. initiated by the United States Forces “This project displays the cooperation Korea commander (then, Gen. Leon J. and commitment of the Republic of LaPorte), and represents a priority for Korea and the United States to the USFK and our ROK counterparts. Upon alliance and defense of Korea,” said Col. completion, this facility will play a vital William “Bill” Gibson, Army Field role in the maintenance of U.S. Army Support Brigade-Far East commander. pre-positioned stocks.” “This maintenance facility project was The stocks stored and maintained at

Camp Carroll represent about 50 percent of the U.S. ground combat power in Korea. The facility will have 16 maintenance bays equipped with automatic lube systems, in-floor flush lifts and a crane system able to lift 35 tons of Army vehicle components. “Not only is this facility designed with maintenance in mind,” Gibson said, “but the areas outside the maintenance bays will contribute directly to supporting the mission.” The admin areas will have specially designed classrooms to provide training to the workforce and, upon contingency, can support incoming tactical units during the handoff of equipment, he said. The office area will be fully wired for both secure and non-secure communications; will have a large break area; and a latrine area complete with lockers and showers. Also included in the design are a weapons storage vault, centralized tire shop, supply and communications rooms, storage areas, and a mass notification system. “This project is one of several significant mission support and quality

See AFSB, Page 28

World It’s not the World Cup ...
Several Korean teachers of English take a break from their tour of U.S. Army installations in Daegu July 21 to try their hand at foosball in the Community Activities Center at Camp Walker. Thirty-four teachers from Daegu Metropolitan City and administrators from the Daegu Board of Education spent the day with the Area IV Support Activity as part of an educator outreach program designed to help them get to better know Americans and the U.S. Army. The teachers and adminstrators toured a barracks, Army family housing quarters, the commissary, library and had lunch in the Camp Henry dining facility with U.S. and Korean Augmentation to the U.S. Army Soldiers.

KEVIN JACKSON

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Proper Mailing Address Usage Important The Area IV Consolidated Mailroom provides directory service for mail that has been missent, or improperly addressed, along with routine forwarding for 12 months after patrons make a Permanent Change of Station. It receives an excessive volume of mail requiring directory service. Currently, the staff processes about 3,000 incoming letters a day with about 200 of those missing box numbers. Another 200 have incorrect box numbers or incorrect units. Instead of returning the mail as insufficiently addressed, the mailroom staff looks up the customer information and delivers the mail. Spending a couple of minutes on each of these 400 letters, adds about 12 hours to the total processing time and can result in extra days before the customers receive their mail. Customers are asked to please contact correspondents and provide them with their complete and correct address to avoid unnecessary delays in receiving mail. For more information, contact Staff Sgt. Fikisha Maree at 768-7567, or Kevin Jones at 768-7481. Gospel Service Gets Temporary Home Until further notice, the Camp Henry Collective Protestant Gospel Service (New Dimensional Christian Ministry) will be held at the Camp Walker Chapel Activities Center (Fellowship Hall). Services will begin at 10:30 a.m. each Sunday. For more information, contact Michael L. Collins at 7644614. Lifeguard Camp Offered A Junior Lifeguard Camp, for children ages 10-14, is scheduled from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., Aug. 14 – 18 at the Camp Carroll Indoor Pool, Bldg. 151. Participants will receive basic knowledge in lifeguard skills, CPR, First Aid and general safety. All levels of swimming ability are welcome. A certified lifeguard provides instruction of this course. A fee of $35 includes study materials and a T-shirt. The signup deadline is Aug. 10 and class size is limited to 40. For more information, contact Carlos Algarin at 765-8118. Credit Union Extends Carroll Hours Thanks to some recent updates in technology, the USA Federal Credit Union at Camp Carroll is now open 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday. For more information, contact Charles Hoelderlin at 7687169/6501.

July 28, 2006

Area IV

The Morning Calm Weekly

Staff Sgt. Michael Carr, HHC, Area IV Support Activity, and Pfc. Julie Burns, 728th Military Police Company, compete in the first round of the 1st Annual USO Rock, Paper, Scissors Tournament at Camp Henry Army Community Service, Tuesday during the ACS Open House.

PHOTOS

BY

STEVEN HOOVER

Daegu ACS celebrates anniversary
By Steven Hoover
Area IV Public Affairs

CAMP HENRY – In celebration of Army Community Services’ 41st anniversary, the Daegu ACS held an Open House Tuesday. The event featured information displays, food, drink, a live radio remote with AFNK-Daegu, a piñata filled with candy for the children, door prizes and the Area IV finals of the USO-sponsored “1st Annual Rock, Paper, Scissors Tournament.” Before the establishment of ACS, Army wives often operated lending closets, thrift shops and nurseries; raised funds to help the needy; assisted in emergencies; taught and trained the inexperienced; provided care and comfort to the ill and bereaved; and, through a grassroots understanding of the Army community, contributed significantly to its stability. But, many times, once those leaders transferred,

the social service activities disappeared or stagnated. ACS was developed to eliminate that adverse aspect and to provide a flexible framework for the operation of a viable system of social services. July 25, 1965, Gen. Harold K. Johnson, then Army Chief of Staff, sent a letter to all major commanders announcing the establishment of ACS. And, in 1966, Lt. Col. Emma Baird, commonly referred to as the “mother of the modern ACS” traveled to Europe to assist commanders in establishing centers, primarily in Germany. Today, the ACS program provides so many services, that it is sometimes hard to know what falls under which umbrella. Whether it’s personal finance classes, relocation assistance or emergency help, ACS offers a variety of services. To find out more about the services offered, call 768-7112.

ACS Volunteer Coordinator Bonnie McCarthy helps the children divvy up the remaining candy that fell from the piñata.

In recognition of ACS’s 41st Anniversary, the organization held an Open House that featured door prizes, a buffet lunch, remote broadcasts by AFNK-Daegu and the opportunity for folks to have some fun in the middle of the day.

Sgt. 1st Class Dean Farr, HHC, 19th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), won the Area IV Rock, Paper, Scissors Tournament and advanced to the finals at Dragon Hill Lodge Saturday.

The Morning Calm Weekly

Area IV
Society. For 60 years, Kim Duk-hyung has personally kept alive the memory of 11 U.S. Army Air Corps crewmembers who died in a fiery crash near the summit of Mangwoon Mountain, located on Namhae Island, about 75 miles west of Camp Hialeah in Busan. Their B-24 Bomber, “Lady Luck II,” was shot down by Japanese anti-aircraft fire Aug. 7, 1945. After World War II, Kim began annual memorial services at the site to honor those Americans who perished in the crash. In 1948, he founded the War Memorial Activities Association. He also resolved to build a monument, which was finished in 1956. Kim Sang-hwan is president of Korean and American Friendship Circle and has fully supported the program since its creation in 2004. Through this program, he has paired Korean families and university students with American families. He has invited 50 U.S. Soldiers and their family members to his home to share Korean food, traditions and culture, and has also sponsored trips to the Daegu Opera House. Han has been with People to People Daegu Chapter since 1976, and was elected as its president in July 2003. In the past, he has organized tours to Gyeongju for U.S. Soldiers and their family members to help them learn about Korean culture in the capital city of the Shilla Dynasty. This past October, he organized a tour to Goryeong and Haein Temple. In May 2005, he also planned the PTP Korea and American Friendship Golf Tournament and Banquet, during which PTP presented 10 U.S. Soldiers with its Good Neighbor Awards.

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July 28, 2006

27

USFK salute ‘good neighbors’
Area IV honored with three selections
By Steven Hoover
Area IV Public Affairs

NEWS & NOTES
Camp Henry Term IV College Registration Opens Camp Henry Term IV college registration for the University of Maryland and Central Texas College is from Aug. 7 – Sept. 2, with classes beginning Sept. 5. For more information, contact Roger White at 768-7348. University of Phoenix Offers Masters In Management Program Starting Sept. 26, the University of Phoenix is offering a Masters of Management degree program at Camp Henry. The entire degree program can be completed in less than two years. Military Tuition Assistance rates apply and civilian employees, family members and Korean National employees may attend at the discounted military tuition rate. For more information, contact Larry Kurzer at 7688094. Boxing Program Seeks New Members The Camp Carroll Boxing Program, which meets 6 – 8 p.m. weekdays at the Crown Jewel Fitness Center, is looking for novice or open fighters to join its ranks. For information, contact Carlos Algarin at 765-8118. TSA Hosts Membership Event The Taegu Spouse’s Association will host a membership drive event 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Apple Tree Gift and Thrift Shop on Camp Walker. For information, contact Kim Hales at 053210-6191.

CAMP HENRY – Seven Koreans and one organization will be recognized by Gen. B. B. Bell, commander, United Nations Command/Combined Forces Command/United States Forces Korea, at the 2006 Annual USFK Good Neighbor Awards Ceremony 5:30 p.m., today, at Dragon Hill Lodge. They are being honored for their outstanding contributions to promote friendship and strengthen the alliance between the Republic of Korea and the United States. The ceremony includes three honorees from Area IV. The award categories and winners for 2006 are: Special Category (Lifetime Achievement): Kim Dukhyung, director of the War Memorial Activities Association, Namhae. Individual Category: Han Tae-dong, president, People-to-People International Daegu Chapter; Kim Sang-hwan, president, Korean and American Friendship Circle, Daegu; Retired Sgt. Maj. Kang Kyung-seo, chief director, U.S./ROK Marine Corps Friendship Association; Honorable Kwon Doo-hyun, vice governor, Gyeonggi Province Office II; Lee Jin-ju, coordinator, Sook Myung Women’s University-Special Operations Command Korea CKOR Outreach Group; and Wouen You-dack, director, Pyongtaek City Hall, Songtan Branch. Organization Category: Korea-American Friendship

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Area IV Area IV triathletes compete, place at triathlon championship
28 http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly
July 28, 2006
By Steven Hoover
Area IV Public Affairs

The Morning Calm Weekly

NEWS & NOTES
Evergreen Renovation Slated Renovation of the Evergreen Community Club kitchen, offices and Fairway Lounge at Camp Walker is scheduled to begin today. The dining and bar operations for the entire club will be closed for 45 days. The renovation of the Fairway Lounge is expected to take about 180 days. During the closure, The Hilltop Club will begin serving “hot lunch” specials from 11 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. and continue throughout the Evergreen’s closure. For information, contact Richard Vaughn at 768-7716. Vacation Bible School Scheduled Vacation Bible School 2006, entitled “Fiesta, Where kids are fired up about Jesus,” is scheduled from 9 a.m. – noon Monday – Aug. 4, at Soldier Memorial Chapel on Camp Walker. For information and registration, call Pak Yun-chong at 764-4498. School Transportation Office Open Taegu American School’s Student Transportation Office is open 7:30 a.m. – 4 p.m. daily to register new students who need bus transportation for the upcoming school year, which begins Aug. 29. For information, contact Michael Dudley at 768-7722. Monthly Prayer Breakfast Offered The Men of The Morning Calm host a monthly Prayer Breakfast and Fellowship the first Saturday of each month, starting at 8 a.m. in the Camp Walker Chapel Annex. For information, contact Gary Catlin at 768-8401 or Adam Morrison at 010-8671-4788.

CAMP HENRY – Five triathletes from Area IV put themselves to a rigorous test Saturday at the 2006 8th U.S. Army Triathlon Championship at Camp Casey. Mark Schmidt, a specialist with Company A, 16th Medical Logistics Battalion at Camp Carroll, placed first in the Men’s Open category, covering the 400meter swim, 20-kilometer bike and five-kilometer run in 1 hour, 9 minutes, 45 seconds. Schmidt, 28, said that his primary motivation for competing here is to be ready to do triathlons with his brother, who is currently assigned to the 10th Mountain Division, Fort Drum, N.Y. “A couple of weeks ago, I saw a flyer for the Camp Carroll Triathlon and decided to enter,” he said. After finishing that event at 1:19:20, he decided that he’d

better pick up his training. Besides regular physical training with the unit, he usually works out four nights a week and weekends. Although Schmidt won the open category, his overall time was actually the second best of the day. Art Mathisen, a captain at 121st General Hospital, Yongsan, competing in the Men’s Senior category, covered the course in 57:02. Also competing in the Men’s Senior category were Camp Henry civilians Patrick Noble, who finished sixth with a time of 1:13:41 and Tom Corcoran, who came in seventh at 1:16:05. In the Women’s Division, Amelia Carter, a first lieutenant assigned to 19th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), placed second with a time of 1:17:47, and Lisa Keough, a major assigned to the 501st Sustainment Brigade, finished fourth at 1:26:05.

AFSB
of life improvements at Camp Carroll, all designed to make Camp Carroll a superb location to live and work,” said Lt. Col. John F. Loefstedt, deputy commander, USACE-FED. “This maintenance facility is nothing without the personnel inside,” he added. “This world class facility will be used by a world class team consisting of military, U.S. and Korean civilian employees, U.S. contractor employees and Korean Service Corps members of the AFSB-NEA team. This team has exhibited an unwavering dedication to the mission by maintaining the equipment of APS-

from Page 25
4, and keeping it ready ‘to fight tonight.’ “This facility will give the team the tools and infrastructure it needs to continue this mission into the future,” he added. This vehicle maintenance facility, along with the recently started $10.1 million project that includes a new bowling center, casual dining facility, swimming pool and multi-purpose field upgrade, are just some of the new construction going on here. This project is scheduled for completion in November 2007.

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The Morning Calm Weekly

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July 28, 2006

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July 28, 2006

Korean Language

The Morning Calm Weekly

Learn Korean Easily

The Phrase of the Week :

“May I use your phone?”

Jonhwa jom ssodo doemnikka?
telephone use May I

Vocabulary
‘cheerwol’

‘parwol’

‘kuwol’

Situation of the Week : communications
Where is a public phone?
Gongjung jonwhaga odie issumnikka?

Is Mr./Ms. (
( )ssi kyesimnikka?

) in?

When will he/she be back?
Onje doraosimnikka?

I’ll call him/her again.
Dasee jonwha hagessumnida.

Hello.
Yob ose y o.

My phone number is (
Je jonwha bonhonun ( ) imnida.

).

Korean Expression of the Week

This story is about:
Base access may be denied to safety violators

It’s on me!
Naega ssonda

It means a person who says this phrase will pay for whatever a group will do. “Food and drinks are on me!”

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