The Morning Calm Korea Weekly - May 2, 2008

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May 2, 2008 • Volume 6, Issue 28

http://imcom.korea.army.mil

Published for those serving in the Republic of Korea

Inside

hosts

Law Day 2008 inspires youth to get creative Page 18

USAG-Humphreys hosts colorful ‘Friendship Week’ Page 23

USAG Daegu community celebrates families Page 27

Humphreys Transforms
With initial single Soldier barracks construction complete, engineers prepare land dubbed ‘Parcel One’ for next wave of construction.
Fred Davis, the Army Relocation Program manager with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Far East District. As currently planned, by 2012 US Forces Korea headquarters and other Yongsanbased units and organizations will move to Humphreys Garrison. The post will swell in population from about 10,000 today to nearly 45,000 — and grow another 2,000 acres. Before that can happen, however, contractors under the auspices of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Far East District must prepare the new land and build the new post. Parcel One is former farmland that lies just off the western part of the installation. Because it had been used for growing rice the land had to be drained of water and filled. Now, after nearly a year and an endless convoy of dirt-filled trucks dumping their loads onto the parcel part of the land is ready for construction. by Bob McElroy USAG Humphreys Public Affairs USAG HUMPHREYS — The future has arrived for US Army Garrison Humphreys and it is in the form of six new single Soldier barracks to be built on the piece of land dubbed “Parcel One.” In about four weeks contractors for Hanwha Engineering and Construction Co. Ltd. of Seoul will begin construction of four new barracks on the 205-acre site thereby opening a new chapter in the Humphreys’ history. About a month later, in mid-July, workers from Shinsung Engineering and Construction Co. Ltd., also of Seoul will begin work on two more barracks. The six barracks will cost approximately $85 million and be paid for by Military Construction Army funds, according to The first step is to sink hundreds of reinforced-concrete piles deep into the ground to anchor each barracks’ foundation into the solid material beneath the ground. The piles form the first part of the foundation for the barracks, Davis said. – See Transforms, Page 23 –

USAG Humphreys’ newly constructed barracks (center) are a welcome edition to the rapidly transforming installation. The barracks are just the first to be built as ‘Parcel One’ (background) is prepped for additional construction. In addition to the barracks, work on a ‘Super Gym’ nears completion (inset left). — U.S. Army photos by Bob McElroy and Edward Johnson

NEWS • PAGE 2 http://imcom.korea.army.mil
Published by Installation Management Command - Korea Commanding General/Publisher: Brig. Gen. Al Aycock Public Affairs Officer/Editor: Edward N. Johnson Senior Editor:Susan Silpasornprasit USAG-RED CLOUD Commander: Col. Larry A. Jackson Public Affairs Officer: Margaret Banish-Donaldson CI Officer: James F. Cunningham USAG-YONGSAN Commander: Col. David W. Hall Public Affairs Officer: David McNally CI Officer: Kenneth Fidler Staff Writer: Cpl. Im Jin-min USAG-HUMPHREYS Commander: Col. John E. Dumoulin Jr. Public Affairs Officer: Bob McElroy Writer/Editor: Andre D. Butler CI Officer: Stacy Ouellette USAG-DAEGU Commander: Col. Michael P. Saulnier Public Affairs Officer: Ronald Inman CI Officer: Samuel G. Hudson Staff Writer: Cpl. Na Kyung Chul Staff Writer: Cpl. Jang Won il This Army newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The Morning Calm Weekly are not necessarily official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, Department of Defense, or Department of the Army. The editorial content of this weekly publication is the responsibility of the IMCOM-Korea, Public Affairs, APO AP 96205. Circulation: 9,500 Printed by Oriental Press, a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Government, under exclusive written contract with the Contracting Command-Korea. The civilian printer is responsible for commercial advertising. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the U.S. Army or Oriental Press of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the printer shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. Oriental Press President: Charles Chong Commercial Advertising Telephone: 738-5005 or 723-4253 Fax: (02) 790-5795 E-mail: [email protected] Mail address: PSC 450, Box 758, APO AP 96206-0758 Location: Bldg. 1440, Yongsan, Main Post SUBMISSIONS OR COMMENTS: Phone: DSN 724-TMCW (8629) Fax: DSN 724-3356 E-mail: MorningCalmWeekly @korea.army.mil

The Morning Calm

NEWS Korean ward breaks ground for complex on former USFK land
by David McNally USAG-Yongsan Public Affairs More than 5,000 Seoul residents gathered to celebrate the ground-breaking of the Yongsan Ward’s new administrative complex April 25. Yongsan is one of 25 wards that make up Seoul, the fifth largest city in the world. Yongsan is the municipal district outside of the Yongsan Garrison gates. The Yongsan population is nearly 250,000. In 2002, U.S. Forces Korea agreed to return a parcel of land adjacent to U.S. Army Garrison-Yongsan to the Republic of Korea. The land had been used as a parking lot for Army And Air Force Exchange Service taxis. “We are very happy this land was made available to us,” Yongsan Ward Mayor Park Jang-gyu told USAG-Yongsan Garrison Commander Col. Dave Hall during a recent Arbor Day ceremony. “The construction of the Yongsan administrative complex has been a goal of mine for a long time.” Park specifically praised the work of

THE MORNING CALM

USAGYongsan Deputy Garrison Commander Don Moses greets local officials. More than 5,000 Seoul residents gather to celebrate the ground-breaking of the city ward’s new administrative complex April 25. (Below left) Artist’s concept of the new Yongsan Ward Administrative Complex. Construction on the facility began April 25 with a ground-breaking ceremony. — U.S. Army Photos By David McNally the predecessor of USAG-Yongsan. Wilberger has since retired. At the event, Park told the crowd there will be inconveniences due to the construction and traffic, but the new facility will “improve the effectiveness of administrative works, provide various kinds of welfare for the general public and be the central place for cultural use.” Park said Seoul invested about $40 million in the project. It should be completed in 2010. During the ceremony, Mayor Park was joined by Seoul Mayor Oh Saehoon and many other city officials. Entertainers kept the crowd energized before the spectacular finale of confetti and colored smoke, balloons and even the release of doves. U S A G - Yo n g s a n D e p u t y G a r r i s o n Commander Don Moses represented the garrison at the ceremony. The 8th U.S. Army Band also performed for the gathering. “It’s great to see the energy of our neighbors,” Moses said. “This was a world-class event. We are proud of our relationship with the Korean people.” Moses said he was happy to be part of the process to make the administrative complex a reality.

former 34th Support Group Commander Col. Steve T. Wilberger for his part in making the land available. The 34th SG was

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Military Police receive accolades from Korean National Police
Special to The Morning Calm best to prevent crime through our presence, but often times we have to investigate after an incident In a ceremony at the Mapo has taken place. The primary Precinct Police Station, Capt. reason the USFK/EUSA crime Michael Gillispie, commander rate in the Mapo area has fallen is of the 142nd Military Police because commanders at all levels Company and USAG-Yongsan are enforcing Gen. Bell’s policies. Provost Marshal, and Sgt. 1st Major Subordinate Commanders Class Annette Grace, USAG such as Brig. Gen. Max Lobeto, Yongsan Provost Sergeant commanding general 19th were recognized for their ESC and USAG-Yongsan’s Col. commitment to community law DavidHall are working hard enforcement. The Mapo Chief every day to ensure that Soldiers of Police presented them with live the Army Values by doing the Certificates of Appreciation Capt. Michael Gillispie, commander of the 142nd Military Police Com- right thing on a daily basis.” for outstanding service. Due Whether they are USFK to the coordinated efforts of pany and USAG-Yongsan Provost Marshal, is recognized for his commitment to community law enforcement. — Courtesy Photo Servicemembers or Korean the Yongsan Military Police, National Police, local law Area II Director of Emergency all the hard work the Yongsan MPs enforcement leaders and Soldiers are working Services, and the local Korean National Police, the Mapo area has experienced a significant have done to prevent USFK criminal together to make the local community a safer decrease in USFK Service Member crime incidents from occurring in the Mapo place. Located north of the Han River, Maporate over the last year. Senior Superintendent area.” Capt. Michael Gillispie expressed gu is a neighborhood next to Yongsan-gu and Hong, Seong Sam commented on the recent his heartfelt gratitude and in return includes the Hong-Ik University Area. success at the ceremony, saying, “I appreciate said, “As Military Police, we do our

Submitting to The Morning Calm Weekly Send Letters to the Editor, guest commentaries, story submissions and other items: [email protected]. For all submitted items include a point of contact name and telephone number. All items are subject to editing for content and to insure they conform with DoD guidelines. IMCOM-K Public Affairs and the Morning Calm Weekly staff are located in Bldg. 1416, Yongsan Garrison Main Post. For information, call 724-3365.

MAY 2, 2008

NEWS

NEWS • PAGE 3 www.imcom.korea.army.mil

MP Blotter
The following entries were excerpted from the military police blotters. These entries may be incomplete and do not imply guilt or innocence. AREA I: Aggravated Assault; Subject #1 and Victim #1 were involved in a verbal altercation, which turned physical when Subject #1 grabbed Victim #1’s right bicep with her left hand and right hand and then attempted to stab Victim #1 in the neck with a broken bottle. Victim #1 tried to use his left arm to protect his neck at which time Subject #1 stabbed Victim #1 in his left fore arm. Victim #1 then pulled his right hand loose at which time Subject #1 fell to the ground. Victim #1 then reported to the CQ desk and the MPs were notified. Subject #1 proceeded to follow Victim #1 into the building and was approached by the CQ, Witness #1, who asked her to calm down. Subject #1 was being belligerent and made a continuous effort to get to Victim #1. Witness #1 who is an MP assigned to 1HBCT then detained Subject #1 by hand irons until the MP arrived. Subject #1 was apprehended and transported to the USAG-Casey PMO where she was advised of her legal rights, which she invoked. Subject #1 was further processed and released to her unit. Victim #1 sustained a minor laceration on his left forearm and a scratch on his right arm. This is a final report. AREA II: Assault Consummated by a Battery; Subject #1 and Victim #1 were involved in a verbal altercation, which turned physical when Subject #1 grabbed Victim #1’s arms at an off-post club. Victim #1 sustained injuries consisting of scratches to her arms, but declined medical treatment. Subject #1 was detained and transported to the Yongsan Main KNP Station where he was charged by KNP under RCC ART #212 (Assault). Subject #1 was released into MP Custody on a CJ Form 2 and transported to the USAG-Yongsan PMO where he was advised of his legal rights, which he invoked. Subject #1 was further processed and released to his unit. This is a final report. AREA IV: Traffic Accident with Injuries; Damage to Private Property; Following Too Close; Subject #1, operating a POV, and Victim #1, operating a POV, were travelling Southbound when Victim #1’s vehicle was braking due to Person Related’s vehicle being stalled in the lane, and Subject #1’s vehicle failed to maintain proper distance and struck Victim #1’s vehicle on HWY #11 adjacent to Dongshin Bridge, Daegu. Damages to Subject #1’s vehicle consisted of dents and cracks to the right front bumper and hood. Damages to Victim #1’s vehicle consisted of dents and scratches to the rear bumper. KNP responded, filed a report and preferred no charges. Subject #1 rendered a written sworn statement admitting to the offense. Both parties agreed to a private settlement through insurance. Victim #1 was transported by ambulance to Hangwang hospital where he was treated for injuries consisting of neck and back pain. Subject #1 and Victim #1 were processed and released on their own recognizance. Both vehicles were released to their operators. Subject #1 and Victim #1 reported utilization of their seatbelt. ECOD is unknown. This is a final report. AREA V: Insubordinate Conduct Toward a Non-Commissioned Officer; Provoking Speeches and Gestures; Drunk and Disorderly; Communicating a Threat; While Victim #1 was working on Base Patrol he was posted at BLDG #511 when Subject #1 approached him and attempted to shake his hand. Victim #1 shook Subject #1’s hand and at that time Subject #1 stated to him, “I want to play with you” and jumped onto the road into oncoming traffic. Victim #1 asked him to step back onto the sidewalk. Subject #1 complied and then jumped back onto the roadway. After a couple of times of going back and forth from the roadway to the sidewalk, Subject #1 finally returned to the sidewalk. Victim #1 stated he then asked Subject #1 if he was O.K. and Subject #1 replied that he was going to hit Victim #1 and his demeanor changed from calm to angry. Subject #1 was transported by SF to the SFCC where he was advised of his legal rights, which he invoked. Subject #1 was processed and released to his unit.

Korea’s parks come to life with performances and vendors during the spring and summer months. — U.S. Army Photo By Edward Johnson

SIGHTS AND SOUNDS: Current events and activities
Seoul Lantern Fest (May 3 – 4)
Participants can enjoy an exhibition of traditional lanterns May 2 at Bongeunsa Temple, Samseong-dong; the eve celebration of the festival on the streets of Insa-dong, featuring shows and a parade May 3 from 7-9 p.m. in front of Jogyesa Temple; the Buddhist Street Fest at which participants can create their own lantern, sample temple food, make traditional art pieces and enjoy song and dance performances May 4 from noon to 7 p.m. on the street in front of Jogyesa Temple in Insa-dong; the Lantern Parade features floats and 100,000 lanterns May 4 from 7-9:30 p.m. from Dongdaemun to Jogyesa Temple; and the Finale May 4 from 9:30-10:30 p.m. on the street in front of Jogyesa Temple. More information about his event can be found at www.LLF.or.kr/eng or www.tour2korea.com

Jindo Sea Parting Fest (May 5-7)

The parting of the sea in Jeollanam-do is spectacular to behold. The world-famous wonder stretches 2.8 kilometers and 40 meters wide, exposing the areas dividing Hoedong-ri, Gogunmyeon and Modo-ri, Uisin-myeon. Tide differences in the morning and evening create a mysterious ocean road on which visitors can walk. Besides the unusual phenomenon that draws millions of witnesses each year, the festival will offer musical and folk performances, craft activities and souvenirs for sale. The festival is located at Gagye Beach, Modo-ri, Uisin-myeon, Jindo-gun, Jeollanam-do. For more information, visit www. tour2korea.com

Fashion events (May 3-12)

Hi Seoul Festival (May 4-11)

Starting with the opening ceremony on the evening of May 4, the Hi Seoul Festival will kick off with fireworks and artistic performances. Every night of the festival, a light show called the “Gala of Eight Colors” will invite people to enjoy a colorful dance party in Seoul Plaza. The theme of this May’s Hi Seoul Fest is the city’s palaces. The five palaces in Seoul will house various programs under the name “Palace Kaleidoscope.” At Gyeongbokgung Palace, the Grand Palace of the Joseon Kingdom (1392-1910), people can learn about the life of King Sejong, the fourth king of Joseon. Deoksugung Palace, located across the City Hall, will be the “Palace of Crossover” and will feature modern concerts and art flea markets. Gyeonghuigung Palace will feature royal life and a musical performance in the evening. At Changdeokgung Palace and Changgyeonggung Palace, Korean traditional performances can be enjoyed. Location: Seoul Plaza, five Palaces of Seoul (Gyeongbokgung Palace, Changgyeonggung Palace, Deoksugung Palace, Changdeokgung Palace, Gyeonghuigung Palace), Cheonggyecheon Stream. For more information, visit www.tour2korea.com

The Seoul Fashion Center in Seoul Business Agency invites USFK members and their families to experience Korean fashion shopping culture and events: Dongdaemun Market Spring Event (May 3-12), 4-8 p.m. Outdoor performance, outdoor fashion show and other events; Dongdaemun Fashion Market, May 3-12, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Dongdaemun Wholesale Shopping Street and Flea Market around Stadium; Dongdaemun Fashion Designer’s Fashion Show, May 9, 7-9 p.m.; Outdoor Fashion Show; Dongdaemun Fashion Festival Dance Contest, May 10, 6-8 p.m.; dance contest open to anyone and dance groups. Seoul Fashion Center will provide buses for round trip bus and Seoul night view tour from May 1-3. The Seoul city government will provide free bus transportation for large groups of Servicemembers and their families who want to visit the 2008 Dongdaemun Spring Shopping and Fashion Festival through May 12.Groups must have more than 20 people to be eligible for the bus service and be assigned to one of the U.S. Army Garrison-Yongsan installations within Seoul. Organizations interested must call An at 738-5212 to arrange transportation.

Source: www.korea.net, www.seoulselection.com, www.hotelnet.com, http://english.tour2korea.com, www.visitseoul.net — No endorsement implied.

NEWS • PAGE 4 http://imcom.korea.army.mil

NEWS
PM DWTS is replacing aging 12-strand, single mode fiber optic cable with 24-strand, Corning LEAF (Large Effective Area Fiber) fiber optic cable. “This doubles the available fiber capacity,” said McIlwain, “and because we’re optically multiplexing, we can achieve much higher bandwidth with less signal loss.” The intent of the DMU program, said Baker, is to provide a digital microwave transmission backbone, meshed with asynchronous transfer mode Switches and SONET node infrastructure across the fiber

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Technicians provide meshed communications architecture for U.S. Forces Korea warfighters
by Stephen Larsen Defense Wide Transmission Systems When warfighters of the United States Forces Korea, 8th U.S. Army and Republic of Korea transport command, control, communications, computers and intelligence information throughout the Korean Peninsula, it rides over a state-of-theart meshed communications architecture, thanks to a decades-long partnership between the Regional Chief Information Office-Korea and the Product Manager, Defense Wide Transmission Systems. PM DWTS – part of the Army’s Program Executive Office, Enterprise Information Systems’ Project Manager, Defense Communications and Army Transmission Systems – is implementing this meshed transmission architecture under three comprehensive and complementary programs: The Korea Optical Fiber Backbone Replacement program, the Korea Optical Transmission Network program and the Digital Microwave Upgrade program. According to Dan Baker of the RCIOK, these programs together provide robust communications for USFK communicators for their combatant commander sensor information, command and control for the component services and ensure netcentric advantages throughout the operational area of USFK. “The whole intent is to provide a meshed communications infrastructure that is survivable, redundant and provides the highest quality of service,” said Baker. Lt. Col. Clyde Richards, PM DWTS, said that KOBR, KOTNet and DMU represent a “model architecture” and a move away from outdated, traditional wide-area transmission systems that have previously been implemented. “KOBR, KOTNet, and DMU are initiatives to leverage state of the art technologies that have resulted in better, faster, and cheaper C4I transmission solutions for the Global Information Grid infrastructure in Korea,” said Richards. KOBR increases bandwidth capacity & reduces path loss Gary McIlwain, PM DWTS project leader, said that under the KOBR program,

Staff Sgt. Nathaniel Bradbury, 293rd Signal Company configures test euipment inside a communications rack. — Courtesy Photo optic backbone provided under the KOBR program. McIlwain said the DMU program is being implemented in eight phases. Phases one through four, which upgraded installations from the north to Camp Humphreys, started in 1998 and were completed in 2004. Phases five through eight, to upgrade installations south of Camp Humphreys, started in 2004 and are scheduled to be completed in 2012. “With PM DWTS, we’ve been able to take advantages of changes of technology,” said Baker. “The PM has always been good to us, has had an active and continuous presence in Korea since the 1970s, and they’ve provided continuous support and been a partner on the peninsula since then.”

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Legal office urges flyer not to gamble on non-refundable airline tickets:
– Claims for non-refundable airline tickets that are unusable because of cancelled leave or a change of orders are not payable. – Contact the Military Claims Office at USAG Yongsan, Bldg. #4106, DSN 738-8111, or your local legal office.

MAY 2, 2008

8th Army holds marathon at Carey Fitness Center
by Spc. Alun Thomas USAG-RC Public Affairs USAG - CASEY— Despite cold temperatures and constant drizzle, more than 60 competitors took part in the 2008 Eighth Army Full and Half Marathon at Carey Fitness Center, April 26, featuring runners from all four areas of the Korean peninsula. Runners in the half marathon ran approximately 13.1 miles, while those running the full marathon were required to run 26.2 miles; the course circling the entire USAG-Casey and Camp Hovey area. Kim Pok Man, USAG-RC sports specialist, said a total of 61 runners signed up for the event, 40 running the half marathon, the other 21 competing in the full marathon. The race was an individual competition including both men and women and was divided into eight age categories, ranging from Men’s and Women’s Open, 25 years of age and under, to Men’s and Women’s Senior, age 46 years and older. Winner of the full marathon was Spc. Jeong Kim, 121 Combat Support Hospital, USAG-Yongsan, in 3 hours and 3 minutes. Winner of the half marathon was 1st Lt. Alexander Pagon, Special Operations Command Korea, USAG-Yongsan, in a time of 1:18:23. Pagon said he trained extensively for the race and has been competing in marathons regularly since he joined the Army. “Today was a fabulous day for a race, it was nice and cool,” Pagon said. “It’s a tough course though, especially when you hit the hill around mile eight. That was a real gut check.” Pagon said he has been running constantly for the last two years but finds every race a massive challenge. “As you keep getting better the pace keeps getting faster, and the challenge is to maintain that pace,” Pagon said. Also competing in the half marathon was Staff Sgt. Braulio Silva, Camp Stanley, Bravo Company, 304th Integrated Theater Signal Battalion, who said despite pulling a calf muscle during the marathon, he achieved his goal of completing the race in less than two hours along with other members of his company. “We didn’t have a lot of time to train for this, but we’re happy we finished and met our goals,” Silva said. “We can’t do stuff like this without the support of our command unit; however, it was only with their support we were able to accomplish what we did today.” Silva said he and others in his company trained separately at regular physical training during early mornings in order to prepare for the marathon. “About mile five or six I pulled my calf, and at three different points I had to walk,” Silva said. “But I stretched out and didn’t quit, so with the support of partners pulling me along, I was able to finish.” Awards for those finishing in first, second and third were given after the half marathon, with mementos awarded also for all participants.

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USAG-RC • PAGE 5 www.imcom.korea.army.mil

Cho Hyun Song, (number 113) USAG-Casey Korean Security Guard, battles Jeff Furner, (number 204) Seoul American Elementary School, for 11th place in a furious finish during the Eighth Army Half Marathon, April 26, at USAG-Casey Carey Fitness Center. — U.S. Army Photo By Spc. Alun Thomas

U.S., Korean Soldiers celebrate sisterhood, friendship at U.S. Army Garrison Red Cloud
by Spc. Leith Edgar 2nd Infantry Division Public Affairs USAG-RED CLOUD—The Soldiers of Division Special Troops Battalion and 2nd Logistics Support Command celebrated their first year of sisterhood April 18 on USAG-Red Cloud . The event marked one year since the 2nd LOGCOMM and DSTB signed a memorandum of agreement to promote mutual understanding and friendship. The memorandum of agreement, which consists of six articles, covers the two parties’ working relationship, joint training and annual celebrations. Maj. Yang, Kyung, commander of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd LOGCOMM, (Left) A Soldier of 2nd Logistics Support Command, 3rd Army of the Republic of Korea, focuses on connecting with the ball during a game of jokgu with Soldiers from Division Special Troops Battalion, 2ID, on USAG-Red Cloud April 18. The game of jokgu is a Korean sport that crosses soccer and tennis. — U.S. Army Photo By Spc. Leith Edgar sees the agreement as the basis of an everimproving relationship. “Since last year we have had a number of exchanges, and our ties have become stronger. I hope that this relationship will the 2nd LOGCOMM provides logistical support to the 3rd Army of the Republic of Korea. Capt. Lee, Hyun Woo, a ROK staff officer of USAG-RC, said the event was a chance for the Soldiers to come together and remember the importance of their solidarity. “All of our units under 2ID have a strong relationship with 2ID Soldiers,” Lee said. The sisterhood ceremony included a reading of the agreement, leaders’ remarks and a cake-cutting. Then, the leadership of DSTB squared off against the leaders of the 2nd LOGCOMM in friendly sporting matches, including soccer, softball, bowling and jokgu.After the participants worked up a sweat from the physical activity, they cooled off by taking a dip in a dunk tank. Subordinates paid for an opportunity to plunge their leaders into an icy bath. The event ended with a steak dinner at the Commanding General’s Mess, where Lt. Col. Les Brown touted the strength of the bilateral relationship. “This event is a small representation of the ROK and U.S. Alliance,” Brown said.

“Since last year we have had a number of exchanges, and our ties have become stronger. I hope that this relationship will stay strong.” Maj. Yang, Kyung, commander of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd LOGCOMM
stay strong,” Yang said in a speech during the opening ceremony. Both the Soldiers of DSTB and the 2nd LOGCOMM share the mission of defending the Republic of Korea. However, each unit accomplishes the mission by different means. DSTB supports 2ID and

USAG-RC • PAGE 6 www.imcom.korea.army.mil

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THE MORNING CALM

News & Notes
2ID & USAG-RC Present Holocaust Remembrance Do not stand silent, remember kristallnacht 1938. Speakers are Jacob Rosenberg, Elle Wiesel and Gerda Klein Holocaust survivors. today from 11 a.m. to noon in USAGRC CG’s Mess. For more information call: 732-6856. Volunteer to support 2009 Presidential Inauguration Army is looking for 200 Volunteer Reserve Component Soldiers (USAR, TPU, IMA, IRR, ARNG, or Retiree Recall) that want to volunteer to support the 2009 Presidential Inauguration in Washington, DC. Sourcing this event at 100% is a top priority. For more information contact creighton. [email protected] ACAP Counselor Position Vacancy ACAP counselors provide direct ACAP services to transitioning military personnel, Army civilians, and their family members. Position requires a Master’s Degree or equivalent and two years experience. For more information call: 730-4033. Korean Green Choir The Korean Green Choir has a Mass starting at 3.pm, May 24 at the USAG-RC Chapel, followed by a choir perfromance from 4 to 4:30 p.m. All are invited to attend. EEO/POSH Training EEO/POSH training is scheduled for supervisors 9-11 a.m., non supervisory 1-3 p.m. May 5 at USAG-RC DFMWR Conference Room. Call 732-6277 for more information. Spouses Orientation Program Schedule The Spouses Orientation Program dates are May 13 at USAG-Casey and May 20 at USAG-RC. This is a mandatory brief. For more information call: 732-5883. Women’s Professional Development Symposium The Annual Women’s Professional Development Symposium takes place May 27, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the USAG-Casey Digital Conference Center. Call 732-6273 for more information. USAG-RC Commissary Camp Stanley hosts a block party and yard sale, tomorrow, 11 a.m. - 6 p.m., at the commissary parking lot Call 732-5485 for more information. HQ IMCOM Centralized Mentoring Program Be a mentor, help develop well-rounded managers at the mid or senior level by grooming high potential emloyees to assume higher levels of responsibilities. Mentees from GS-11—13. For more information call: 732-9063. Harvard Strategist Program Harvard Strategist Program is a one year degree producting program open to all Army active competitive category captains. For more information call: 732-7015. Are You Smarter Than A Fifth Grader? If you think you are smarter than a fifth grader then here’s your chance! Event takes place May 5 at USAG-RC Mitchell’s Club, 6-9 p.m. Free admission. Dinner buffet tickets available at nearest CAC. Call 730-4601 for more information.

School children from the Dongducheon area perform a song following the environmental poster award ceremony as part of USAG-Casey’s Earth Day program, held outside Gateway Club, April 25. — U.S. Army Photo By Spc. Alun Thomas

USAG Casey celebrates Earth Day
by Spc. Alun Thomas USAG-RC Public Affairs USAG-CASEY— School children from the Dongducheon area participated in Army Earth Day activities at USAG-Casey April 25, having taken part in an environmental health poster competition, which was judged outside the Gateway Club. The event was sponsored by the Directorate of Public Works, who also set up an environmental trivia stand where people were able to win an Earth Day coffee mug by answering a trivia question correctly. A Petroleum, Oil, and Lubricant Spill Response exercise was due to be conducted outside the Gateway Club, but was cancelled due to rain. Ken Lee, USAG-RC, chief, Environmental Staff Division, said the two local schools were invited so they could learn the importance of protecting the environment. “This event is sponsored by the Casey DPW and we were hoping to have a demonstration of an oil spill as one of the events” Lee said. “The local fire department was going to show the kids how an oil spill is cleaned up.” Richard Bain, USAG-Casey DPW, said DPW is hoping to provoke environmental awareness for everybody in the nearby USAG-Casey community through the Army Earth Day event. “We have extended invitations to local schools, and one is a local elementary school, and the other is the International Christian School, which most American dependants attend,” Bain said. “They are involved with the poster contest for environmental awareness and we also have a trivia stand for Soldiers and family members.TThey have a chance to test their environmental knowledge and get a free prize.” After the school children arrived they

were welcomed by Bain and Capt. Kimberly Nelson, USAG-Casey, Headquarters and Headquarters Company commander. “I want to welcome you and thank you for participating in Earth Day,” Nelson said during her welcoming speech. Nelson thanked the children for being involved in the poster competition after which the awards for best poster were handed out. “I’m sorry everyone can’t come in first place, but I want to thank you all for participating,” Bain said during his address to the children. “I want to encourage you to stay actively involved with environmental protection; there were a lot of good thoughts and initiatives with the posters.” Following the poster award ceremony, the school children sang several songs for the audience before learning of the cancellation of the oil spill response exercise.

‘Pepper Jackson” congratulates 75th ROKA at dinner

Col. Larry ‘Pepper’ Jackson (left), USAG-RC commander, thanked Col. Cho, Yong Mun (second from left), Republic of Korea Army 75th Brigade commander and his soldiers April 23 at the USAG-Casey Warrior’s Club for strengthening the ROK-U.S. alliance. Cho and Jackson were both commissioned as armor officers in the same year, 1984. Prior to the dinner the 75th ROKA team was given a windshield tour of Casey. — U.S. Army Photo by Margaret Banish-Donaldson.

MAY 2, 2008

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command briefings and reports. “All civilians must be trained during the fiscal year,” Johnson said. “The training is spread out over the course of several months in order to be as user friendly as possible.” Annual training is conducted for three distinct groups. In addition to civilian employee training now underway, supervisors will get their own version with some of the same information, but we focus on different methods for supervisors to use for intervention, deterrence and prevention,” Johnson said. Training for the Soldiers is very different, he added. The training is usually conducted by the unit’s prevention leaders. When ADCO is invited to provide education to the unit, it is usually geared to a specific audience, underage drinking. Annual training is more than ‘checking the block’. It is not just a way of saying “you don’t have an excuse because you attended the training. Classes are intended to raise awareness and reduce substance abuse,” he said. “We’re being proactive; putting up the guard rail before the car runs into the ditch. People will always have excuses. The guard rail had no lights,” Another reason substance abuse training is important to people living and working in Korea, is Korean law. “The laws and the culture of Korea are unique,” Johnson said. “For example, when appearing before a Korean judge, it’s important to show remorse. You cannot be remorseful if you claim you cannot remember your actions. The mind set of the culture and laws appear to go hand in hand; something we as Americans take for granted.” The main information to take away from part one of the training, Johnson said, is

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Red Cloud civilians get substance abuse training
by Jack Loudermilk USAG-RC Public Affairs (This is part one of a two part story to continue in the May 9 edition of the Morning Calm Weekly—Ed.) USAG-RED CLOUD—Only time can sober up a person...not black coffee, cold showers, exercise, or any other common “cures.” Alcohol leaves the body of virtually everyone at a constant rate of about .015 percent of blood alcohol content per hour. Thus, a person with a BAC of .015 would be completely sober in an hour while a person with a BAC of 10 times that .15 would require 10 hours to become completely sober. This is true regardless of sex, age, weight, and similar factors, said Wayne Johnson, director, USAG-RC Alcohol and Drug Control Office. The above fact is one of several that a group of American and Korean civilian employees from USAG-RC learned while attending part one of a two part class about substance abuse April 22 in Camp Red Cloud’s Education Center. “This is our first time to break up the annual three-hour training into two sessions of one-and-a-half hours,” Johnson explained. “We’re trying to make it easier on the employees because of other commitments. They will wait one week before attending part two to complete their annual threehour training requirement.” ADCO provides direct supervision, management, and administration over all nonclinical personnel and programs; program management and customer service issues; guidance on alcohol and drug related regulations and policies; and conducts

Wayne Johnson, USAG-RC Alcohol and Drug Control officer, holds up news clippings about real people getting into real trouble during a drug and alcohol abuse training session April 25 at Red Cloud’s Education Center. — U.S. Army Photo By Jack Loudermilk recognizing a problem and knowing what to do about the problem. “If a civilian believes they need help for themselves or a friend, they should start by calling the Employee Assistance Program, at 730-4144. Obviously, it is better to selfrefer. For USAG-RC, we usually have five to 10 self-referrals a year. It is nothing to be ashamed of nor should you be afraid to ask for help. The challenge is getting help for someone who refuses to accept they have a problem,” Johnson said. Abraham Lincoln, the sixteenth president of the United States, stated that, “It has long been recognized that the problems with alcohol relate not to the use of a bad thing, but to the abuse of a good thing.”

USAG-RC volunteers lauded in ceremony
by Spc. Alun Thomas USAG-RC Public Affairs USAG- CASEY—Volunteers from throughout USAG-RC and USAG-Casey, including the 2nd Infantry Division, were recognized at the Annual Volunteer Awards Luncheon April 28, in the Warrior’s Club There were 10 nominees for volunteer of the year and two for volunteer unit of the year, won by Rocio Marino-Crumley and the 2-9 Infantry Battalion in their respective categories. Guest speaker at the ceremony was Sue Teeples, wife of Col. David Teeples, assistant division commander, 2ID, with the awards presented by Maj. Gen. John Morgan, 2ID commander and James Richardson, USAGCasey deputy commander. G w e n d o l y n M c C a r t h y, A r m y Community Services coordinator, said during the introduction, everyone should thank the volunteers individually because of their efforts in volunteering their time and efforts. “Today before you leave we ask you recognize these volunteers with a simple pat on the back or a shake of the hand for their work with their various organizations,” McCarthy said. Chaplain (Maj.) Carol Highsmith, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, USAG-RC, delivered the invocation, which was followed by lunch and a solo rendition of ‘Lean on Me’ by Sgt. Ronald Porter. During her speech, Teeples said she was honored to be asked to address those in attendance as the topic of volunteering is close to her heart, having won numerous awards for her own volunteer work in past years. “My husband and I have been married for 32 years and for 27 of those I have been a volunteer,” Teeples said. “I have volunteered for every Army community I have lived in and have always felt a deep sense of satisfaction in giving to others.” Teeples said those who volunteer are the lifeblood of the community and their contributions are immeasurable. “Volunteers provide so many vital services to support our community, both individually and in organizations,” Teeples said. “Whether it’s teaching English to children, assisting the elderly, or teaching a cooking class, you are making a difference.” Following Teeples’ speech, the nominees for volunteer of the year were announced, all nominees being nominated by their peers, McCarthy said. “We award to you our sincerest thanks and congratulations on your commitment to improving the quality of life of the 2nd Infantry Division and United States Army Garrison,” McCarthy said. “Your devotion to duty exemplifies the flawless condition of the U.S. Army. You are truly second to none.” The awards were presented by Morgan and Richardson, with Marino-Crumley and the 2-9 Infantry Battalion receiving special plaques for their accomplishments as volunteer and volunteer unit of the year Morgan was then presented with a check for $62,757.55 representing money saved by the help of all volunteers, who spent a total of 4,075.5 hours volunteering. “These volunteers have shown dignity and class through their time and energy to make this a place to serve and serve well,” Morgan said. “For this reason we are in your debt, because without volunteers, and their commitment, kindness and generosity, none of this is possible.”

Guest speaker Sue Teeples explains the importance of volunteer work, at the Annual Volunteer Awards Luncheon, April 28, at USAGCasey Warrior Club. — U.S. Army Photo By Spc. Alun Thomas

MAY 2, 2008

Yongsan rolls out red carpet for volunteers
Annual gala gives celebrity status to community volunteers
by Cpl. Im Jin-min USAG-Yongsan Public Affairs YONGSAN GARRISON — Yongsan rolled out the red carpet April 25 to honor its volunteers at the annual Volunteer of the Year recognition banquet, treating them to a night of celebrity status. “This year is very special because all our nominees were awarded volunteer of the year honors,” said Suzanne James, director of U.S. Army Garrison-Yongsan Army Community Service. “Rather than having one winner for the entire community, we wanted to show that all our volunteers are winners. The celebration, dubbed “Night of the Stars,” took on an Academy Awards theme at the Main Post Club to show appreciation to the 58 volunteers and their families who attended. The volunteers-turned-celebrities got their pictures taken in front of a limousine, complete with paparazzi flashing cameras. They each received a celebrity star, enjoyed a dinner featuring the 8th U.S. Army Band, and saw a multi-media presentation of volunteers in action around the community. They even walked the Yongsan “Walk of Fame” to give it some Hollywood flair. Each volunteer’s name was etched on a star-shaped cutout affixed on the walkway to the ball room. “There was a lot of laughter; everybody had fun and was relaxed,” said one attendee, Valarie Francis. Each of the 58 honorees got stage time to receive awards. “You truly are shining stars,” said Col. David Hall, U.S. Army GarrisonYongsan commander.

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“They may think that they are ordinary people doing normal chores, but they are making a fantastic difference in our community with different talents,” added the event’s master of ceremonies, Chaplain (Lt. Col.) James King, USAG-Yongsan installation chaplain. “The Army cannot function effectively without its volunteers,” volunteer Lori Wilhite said. “They are the heart and soul of the community. Personally, I have been able to maintain my skills, learn new skills and make wonderful new friends.”

Individuals, families earn special recognition
At the gala, officials acknowledged several community members for their dedicated contributions to volunteerism:  Lori Wilhite was honored with the President’s Volunteer Service Award. She is an Army Family Team Building instructor and coordinator and serves as the Seoul Army Medical Department Family Readiness Group leader  Hong Sook-hee, who is coordinator for the Korean AFTB and has served as an ACS volunteer program manager, was awarded the President’s Daily Points of Light Award  The family of Staff Sgt. Christopher Rolack was nominated as runner-up of the Association of the U.S. Army Rubbermaid-Irwin Volunteer Family of the Year for 2007. Rolack and his wife, Antoinetta, and five children – Chrische, Chrischel, Crishauna, Crisheena, and Christiana – are all active volunteers  Tami Taliento and her two children, Christian and Emma, received the February Family of the Month award for the hundreds of hours they spend volunteering in the community

(Top) Volunteer Terri Bryant and her children walk past “paparazzi” on their way into the Night of the Stars Volunteer of the Year gala. Bryant volunteers at the Yongsan Library and the South Post Chapel. (Above) Hundreds of community members turned out at the event to honor the community’s volunteer corps. — U.S. Army photos By Cpl. Im Jin-min

First enhanced security pedestrian gate arrives at Yongsan Garrison
by Kenneth Fidler USAG-Yongsan Public Affairs YONGSAN GARRISON — The first of seven automated pedestrian entry gates at Yongsan arrived April 25. The Enhanced Security Pedestrian Gate is in-place at Gate 19 near the 121st Combat Support Hospital and will be operational in early June after testing is complete. “This system will definitely help enhance our force protection since the system allows entrance to the post based on two identification checks -- the ID card and fingerprint,” said Ricky Oxendine, USAGYongsan Emergency Services director. Users will first swipe their ID cards to open the access door. Once inside, a valid fingerprint match will open the second door to allow post access. One person at a time is allowed through the gate. The entry process takes about 12 to 15 seconds, said Sgt. 1st Class Robb Kubiak, U.S. Forces Korea physical security and force protection noncommissioned officerin-charge. “Pedestrians must have their ID cards and fingerprints properly registered in the Defense Biometric Identification System,” Kubiak said. “The system will only recognize what is registered in DBIDs.” DBIDS is the identification verification system security personnel use to identify, control and account for those entering military installations using biometric and barcode technologies. Military Police will monitor the gate 24 hours a day through closed-circuit television and can talk to pedestrians via a speaker system, Kubiak said. For those with strollers or small children, MPs can override the system to allow access. Col. Dave Hall, USAG-Yongsan commander, said the system is state-ofthe-art and will provide important security upgrades to force protection. “These systems were successfully fielded in Europe, and we are looking forward to using them here,” Hall said. Yongsan is the first installation in Korea to receive the system, Kubiak said. A second system will be installed at USAG-Daegu.

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by Kenneth Fidler USAG-Yongsan Public Affairs YONGSAN GARRISON — Brian McNett is one busy eighth grader. After school, he can be found at either the Yongsan or the Hannam Village Middle School Teen Center, volunteering an average of 40 – yes, 40 – hours a week to help out his fellow teens. He just tested for a black belt in tae kwon do and is taking kumdo lessons, as well. And he is president of Yongsan’s Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs of America Torch Club, planning activities for other teens and recruiting new members. “Volunteering gives me something to do so I can give back to the community for the things they do for us,” he said. “If you continue doing something, they’ll continue doing things for you.” It’s that effort that earned him the award of Korea Army Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs of America Youth of the Year for 2008. He now goes on to compete for the Asia-Pacific Army Youth of the Year. “He is an amazing youth,” said Cameron Gonzales, U.S. Army Garrison-Yongsan Middle School Teen Program director. “I am constantly amazed by Brian’s maturity and ability to take on the leadership role whenever needed. He is also one who takes the initiative and makes great things happen in the program.” Brian got the volunteer bug from his stepfather, George Jackson. “What we’ve tried to teach him is the biggest reason that you volunteer in your community ... it makes you a better person and how to deal with people and interact with them,” Jackson said. “We’ve tried to instill in him to treat people with respect and learn how to deal with people.” His mother, Staff Sgt. Stacy Jackson, who works in the 532nd Military Intelligence Battalion on Camp Coiner, said they couldn’t be more proud of Brian. “I was just really speechless when we heard about his award.” She said he’s been volunteering just over a year and never realized how much of an impact it has had on his life. “It took him a little while to finally branch out,” she said. “He knew some friends were going over to the teen center after school, and he just started going over there. He’s a very helpful young man, really willing to help. He just took the ball and ran with it.” Brian credits his volunteer work with teaching him important social skills. “I’ve learned partnership, how to work with other people, get large projects done quickly and efficiently, and how to stay organized,” he said. He stays focused on trying to improve the Teen Center at Hannam Village, a family housing area located about a 10-minute drive from Yongsan Garrison. The center is open Mondays, Wednesdays and Saturdays, and Brian is trying to increase participation. Just recently, he organized a teen lock-in on April 25 that originally was only a sevenhour event ending at 8 p.m. Under his leadership, he turned it into an all-night event featuring a barbecue “hail and farewell” for new and outgoing employees. It also included pool and pingpong tournaments.

THE MORNING CALM

News & Notes
Dental Exams for Retirees Starting Monday, Yongsan’s Dental Clinics 2 and 3 will provide limited dental exams and cleanings to retirees and their spouses by appointments, walk-in or call-in. In addition, during the Courageous Channel Noncombatant Evacuation Exercise May 15-17, dental exams and cleanings will be provided to Retirees and their spouses once validated at the exercise site. For more information, call 736-7715. Dragon Hill Lodge Block Party Dragon Hill Lodge celebrates its 18th anniversary May 2-3 with a block party, games and activities, and a chance to win $10,000. The festivities begin at 5:30 p.m. today with a cake-cutting ceremony in the courtyard followed by a program called “A Complimentary Taste of DHL” featuring DHL specialty food. The block party Saturday will take place in the courtyard. During the block party, active-duty military get a chance to win $10,000 during a special Frisbee toss challenge. Also on Saturday:  PCS garage sale starts at 10 a.m. in the upper-level parking area.  A 3K family walk/run in which children will receive a “zoo” pass and get an animal stamp at various points along the route. Get all stamps and get a prize at the finish line.  Win prizes such as a round-trip ticket to the continental United States and overnight stays at 5-star hotels in Seoul. Only Department of Defense ID card holders are eligible for these prizes. Free Golf Clinic A free golf clinic is 10 a.m. to noon May 10 at the Seongnam Golf Course. PGA professionals will be on hand to provide personalized advice on improving your game. In addition, professionals will assist with video swing analysis, launch monitor and demo clubs upon request. No reservation is required. Call 736-3483. Smoking Cessation Classes The 18th Medical Command Health Promotions Office holds monthly smoking cessation clinics consisting of four, one-hour group sessions. For units with groups of 10-15 people, an instructor can arrange sessions at your organization. For information, call 736-6693/3029. EDIS/Audiology Awareness The 18th Medical Command Educational and Developmental Intervention Services and Audiology will have an information booth 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. May 9 at the Main Exchange. Representatives will be on hand to discuss questions and distribute information on communication and hearing in young children. For information, call 738-6792. Info Assurance Conference U.S. Forces Korea will hold its annual Information Assurance Conference May 6-8 at the Osan Air Base Officer’s Club For information or to register go to: https:// usfk-ia.korea.army.mil. Become an Inspector General The 8th U.S. Army Inspector General has immediate openings for officers wanting to become inspector generals. Vacancies are for majors and branch-qualified captains. Positions can be for up to two years with command sponsorship. For information, call 725-6739 or 723-4006 or e-mail to [email protected] or [email protected].

Yongsan teen Korea’s Youth of Year

“He is an exceptional youth, who is most definitely a positive role model for others.”

Brian McNett volunteers an average of 40 hours a week at the Middle School Teen Centers on Yongsan and at Hannam. — U.S. Army Photo By Kenneth Fidler

Brian’s volunteer work has become more fun than anything else. “He sacrificed a day off to go grocery shopping for the teen centers and deliver the groceries. I thought that was pretty awesome. He’s very generous with his time,” his stepfather said. Gonzales said Brian takes the initiative and “makes great things happen” in the program. “I whole-heartedly believe that Brian McNett deserves to be selected as the National Youth of the Year winner,” Gonzales said. “He is an exceptional youth, who is most definitely a positive role model for others.”

53 earn degrees from University of Maryland
by Pvt. Choi Keun-woo USAG-Yongsan Public Affairs YONGSAN GARRISON — University of Maryland University College- Asia honored its graduates May 5 at its annual commencement ceremony at the Seoul American High School auditorium. Among the 53 who graduated, nine earned associate’s degrees, 41 bachelor’s degrees and three master’s degrees. “This is one of the most significant milestones in your life,” said Dr. Susan C. Aldridge, UMUC president, in her opening speech. “UMUC is proud to be part of this achievement.” During his congratulatory speech, Command Sgt. Major Ralph J. Rusch, U.S. Army Garrison-Yongsan command sergeant major, challenged graduates to continue their pursuit for knowledge. “This is a great achievement,” he said. “But you have a long way to go, and the reason why you have a long way to go is because you are now in a situation to want more knowledge.” Maj. Gen. John W. Morgan III, commanding general of the 2nd Infantry Division, presided over the ceremony. “Education is the key to success,” he told the graduates. “Once you are educated, it’s very hard for others to keep you from succeeding.”

Fifty-three community members listen to their commencement address before receiving their degrees from the University of Maryland University College April 26. — U.S. Army Photo By Pvt. Choi Keun-woo

Aldridge oversaw the conferring of degrees as she personally handed diplomas to each student. After receiving their diplomas, the graduates adjusted the strings on their hats to the right, marking the end of the graduation ceremony. “It means the world to any candidate to graduate,” said Master Sgt. Deborah Gibson of the 175th Financial Management Center. “Knowledge is power and the only way you are going to have power is to continue to learn.” Sgt. 1st Class Anthony C. Johnson, who received an associate’s degree, shared the excitement. “I never graduated across a stage,” he said.

“It felt really good. Education is something you get to keep. No one can take it away from you.” Though exuberance had filled the auditorium, for one family the graduation ceremony was bittersweet. Michelle S. Bremer and her daughter, Sarah Bremer, received the diploma for William F. Bremer. Bremer, 53, finished a bachelor’s degree before dying of lung cancer April 1. “I’m so proud of my husband,” said Michelle. “He was very well aware of his situation. But he never let his illness get in the way of his everyday life and the goals he had set.”

MAY 2, 2008

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Katchi Kapchida!
the opening ceremonies April 22. “These young men are ambassadors for their nation and culture. It is a great opportunity for Americans to learn firsthand about the Korean people.” KATUSA, which stands for Korean Augmentee to the U.S. Army, is a 58-yearold program created at the onset of the Korean War. Selected Korean Soldiers serve alongside their U.S. Army counterparts to strengthen their communication and cultural relationships. “The alliance is strong,” said Col. Dave Hall, U.S. Army Garrison-Yongsan commander. “We have Korea’s best and brightest standing in our formations, and we are proud to call them comrades in arms.” During the week, about 2,000 U.S. and KATUSA Soldiers played soccer, competed in tug-of-war and relay race competitions, exchanged cultural diversities, and enjoyed – See Friendship Week, Page 12 –

KATUSA, U.S. Soldiers strengthen alliance during 32nd Friendship Week
by Pfc. Lee Min-hwi USAG-Yongsan Public Affairs YONGSAN GARRISON — The 32nd annual KATUSA-U.S. Soldier Friendship Week brought U.S. and Korean Soldiers together in spirited competition and cultural exchanges April 21-25. “It has been a great experience interacting with KATUSA Soldiers,” said Pfc. Kristopher Mizwell, 362nd Signal Company, after a soccer match. “You never really get a chance to interact with them, and I had a lot of fun.” The week - designed to strengthen the working and cultural relationships between U.S. and KATUSA Soldiers - featured sporting events, cultural tours, concerts and unit-level activities. “The contributions of our KATUSA Soldiers make the 8th Army what it is today,” said Lt. Gen. Joseph F. Fil Jr., 8th U.S. Army commanding general, at

(Clockwise from main photo) Pvt. Choi Sang-il from U.S. Army Troop Command-Korea, wrestles with Pvt. Lee Yong-jun from 2/2 Aviation; sharing a Katchi Kapchida moment are (left to right) Sgt. Samuel Coleman, Spl. Kim Da-han; Pfc. Carltan Canteen and Sgt. Lee Sung-jae; USAG-Yongsan Strikers go against the 501st Military Intelligence Battalion; a Korean Special Forces Soldier karate chops the tops off of glass bottles during the week’s opening day activities; Pvt. Shin Dong-hyup from 1st Signal Brigade performs during the talent show.

USAG-Y • PAGE 12

http://yongsan.korea.army.mil

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S

Suicide is not the answer
units, friendships and communities. So, what can we do about it? First, we can know the facts. By recognizing the warning signs, you can be a “lifeline” buddy. We all need to be sensitive, caring and proactive. That’s just how it is in the Army family. We look out for each other. Stressful situations that my initiate suicidal feelings include: poor job performance, being passed over for promotion, or receiving a poor evaluation. It may be that the death of a loved one; sickness or illness; or financial problems have taken their toll on someone’s state of mind. There are a myriad of situations that can cause emotional stress or depression. Be on the lookout for verbal clues. If someone you know says something like, “I want to end it all,” the sirens should start going off in your head. Act quickly. Don’t assume that the situation will cure itself. Know that threats and attempts are all ways of asking for help. Immediately call for help. During duty hours you can call the commander or first sergeant, chaplain, or community mental health officials (737-5508). During offhours, contact your unit staff duty, the emergency room (737-5545), on-call chaplain’s 24-hour hotline (010-4793-0143) or military police (911). Remember, be a buddy. Know your people if you are a leader. Recall the clues. Finally, call for help. Let’s take action now to save the heartache that will result from an unnecessary death. Be safe, rather than sorry.

uicide and self-destructive behavior are serious issues. Through education, we can separate the myths from the facts and begin to understand how we can begin to help each other. It is our responsibility to help our Soldiers, Civilians and Families to understand how to identify at-risk individuals. We need to recognize the warning signs and know how to react when we see them. The bottom line is that suicide is deliberately ending one’s own life. It can come as an emotional answer to “just stop the pain.” People who commit suicide may feel it is the only answer. But, I’m here to tell you, it is most definitely not an answer. The fact is, nearly 80 percent of those who attempt or commit suicide give some warning of their intentions beforehand. Talking to someone about their suicidal feels usually makes the person feel relieved that someone finally recognized their emotional pain and they even feel safer talking about it. In the United States, suicide is a problem that strikes once every 18 minutes. More Americans kill themselves than are killed by others. That translates to 80 Americans trying to kill themselves on any given day. Additionally, 1,900 Americans visit emergency rooms for self-inflicted injuries every day. In the military, people are equally affected. The statistics are startling. More than 150 U.S. Servicemembers commit suicide every year. Suicide has a direct impact on families,

Friendship Week
performances from Korea’s best music artists. U.S. Army Troop Command-Korea won the overall competition with a first place in soccer and second places in Korean wrestling and tug of war. U.S. Soldiers gained insight into Korean customs with traditional costume shows, folk plays and kimchi making, while KATUSAs tasted chili and were treated to a barbecue. They also got a chance to show off during a talent show featuring singing and dancing routines. The 1st Signal Brigade team won the talent show with a powerful rock performance featuring more than 15 U.S. and KATUSA Soldiers. Troop CommandKorea team garnered the most laughs as five KATUSA Soldiers dressed as females danced to a Korean pop song. A highlight of the week’s events were

Continued from Page 11
performances by various Korean celebrity music groups, such as Riaa, one of Korea’s top rock vocalists. Watching Korean musical artists in concert perform was a treat for one KATUSA Soldier, Pvt. Jung Won-mo. “Seeing great Korean performers visiting here and singing for us was something that we do not usually expect to happen,” he said at the Riaa concert. Riaa told the audience she was proud to perform for the first time at Yongsan. “I feel the atmosphere is very young and energetic,” she said. “I really hope that there will be another chance to visit here to sing again.” “I am really happy that my unit was successful in many sporting events,” said Pfc. An Ji-woong, a KATUSA Soldier who works at 8th U.S. Army headquarters. “Through this friendship week, I had a great experience meeting and interacting with American Soldiers.”

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MAY 2, 2008

AAFES explains position regarding taxi strike
Special to The Morning Calm Weekly World Cup taxi drivers, working for the company that is under contract with the Army and Air Force Exchange Service are currently on strike at the Camp Casey and Yongsan Army Garrison areas. AAFES officials are working diligently to stay informed in these matters, and hopes there is a resolution very soon, minimizing the disruption in service to our customers. AAFES secondary Taxi Companies, Yonhop and Kwang Song Transportation Co. are providing the maximum service possible at each established taxi stand pickup point in Area I and Area II. While AAFES secondary Taxi companies do not offer English-speaking dispatch service (World Cup is currently the only known source that is able to offer English-speaking dispatch service), or the number of Taxis offered by World Cup, they are doing their best to service the needs of our customers during their absence. We encourage customers to try “ride sharing” with other customers not only now, but in the future. This will not only save customers time but also money. AAFES is doing everything possible to alleviate this situation and to continue to provide safe, quality taxi service to our customers. AAFES recognizes the special considerations World Cup has given AAFES and our customers, and we sincerely hope the World Cup Company is able to resolve the labor disputes with their drivers, so World Cup can continue providing service as quickly as possible.

DOD officials announce new relocation tool for families
Courtesy of Armed Forces Press Service And while most moving takes place over the summer, it’s never too early to start a plan, Ms. Arsht added. Special features of Plan My Move include: A planning calendar It’s almost peak moving season again for military families, and Defense Department leaders want families to know new resources with useful information that can be customized to meet the unique needs of each move; decision tools, such as best communities are available to help. “Plan My Move,” soft-launched in late summer, is the next to live in, best schools, and affordable housing, based on data from military and civilian comparative generation of DOD’s MilitaryHomefront tools to provide an integrated “e-moving” “Plan My Move,” soft-launched in community studies; “smooth move” tips; special calendars for moving to or from solution, officials said. late summer, is the next generation an overseas location; and information Moving to a new community can be a stressful event for all service and family of DOD’s MilitaryHomefront tools to about moving with a special-needs family member. members,” said Leslye A. Arsht, deputy provide an integrated “e-moving.” In addition, families will be able to access undersecretary of defense for military 55 directories of programs and services on community and family policy. “This tool helps to ease that burden. It will put our servicemembers and their installations worldwide, from the barber shop to DOD schools to families in direct contact with those who can help every step of the the family center; maps and driving directions to most locations on the installation; overviews, photo galleries and must-know way, from their current home and community to the new one.” When the user enters the current location, the new location and information for each installation included in the database; current the departure date into the new application, it generates installation local weather conditions; and extensive local community point-ofoverviews, a three-month planning calendar, valuable travel and interest information. “We’re very excited about this new e-moving arrival checklists, as well as important points of contacts and family resource for our servicemembers and their families,” Ms. Arsht said. “Change is always challenging, but we can make it easier. This new program information, Ms. Arsht said. The Plan My Move tool is designed to coach servicemembers application is one more way to support and serve those who sacrifice and their families through the entire moving process, step-by-step. so much for our nation.”

NEWS

IMCOM-K • PAGE 13 http://imcom.korea.army.mil

ACS offers Family Team Building Level I Korean Class
Topics: Military acronyms and terms Military customs and terms May 26 and 27 from 8 a.m. – 2 p.m. Family financial readiness Chain of command Community resources Supporting child’s education

For more information and to sign up, call 738-3617

IMCOM-K • PAGE 14 http://imcom.korea.army.mil

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THE MORNING CALM

8th Army offers insight into Workforce Recruitment Program for College Students with Disabilities
Special to The Morning Calm Weekly The Workforce Recruitment Program for College Students with Disabilities is a resource to connect public and private sector employers nationwide with highly motivated postsecondary students and recent graduates with disabilities who are eager to prove their abilities in the workforce. Employers seek to fill both temporary and permanent positions in a variety of fields. Myths, stereotypes, and misconceptions about people with disabilities often stand in the way when people with disabilities look for jobs, resulting in a high rate of unemployment. The WRP aims to eliminate workplace discrimination one student, ne employer, and one job at a time. prior to graduation or have graduated from such an institution within the past year.

What is the Workforce Recruitment Program?

The WRP provides a unique opportunity for colleges and universities to tap into a system that has been successfully placing students with disabilities in summer and permanent jobs in the public and private sectors for several years, at no cost to the school, the student, or the employer bring together the resources of their disability services and career services offices to promote more effectively the job seeking skills and career readiness of their students with disabilities provide their students with disabilities a chance to grow personally and professionally through participation in this nationwide program.

What Does the WRP Offer to Colleges and Universities?

An applicant for the program must: • have a substantial disability • be a United States citizen • be enrolled in an accredited institution of higher learning on a substantially full-time basis (unless the severity of the disability precludes the student from taking a substantially full-time load) to seek a degree or be enrolled in such an institution as a degree-seeking student taking less than a substantially full-time load in the enrollment period immediately

Who Is Eligible to Participate in the WRP?

The WRP is an excellent way for students with disabilities in all fields of study to market their abilities to a wide variety of potential employers across the United States sharpen their interviewing skills during a required one-on-one meeting with a WRP recruiter gain valuable skills, experience, and contacts on the job prove that people with disabilities can be excellent employees.

What Does the WRP Offer to Eligible Students?

Contact the 8th U.S. Army Equal Employment Opportunity Office at DSN 7246730/6603 for additional information.

For Additional Information:

Sorority holds first College Fair
The Ladies of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., Republic of Korea Alumnae Chapter, held its Annual College Fair at Seoul American Elementary School for the first time April 19. Students from Seoul, Daegu and Osan American High Schools attended as well as Gyeonggi Suwon International School. During the fair, students attended workshops to inform them of the resources available to help ease the transition from high school to college life. The workshops offered were Financial Assistance, Guide to College Financing and Assistance, Writing Workshops, and Transition from DoDDS Pacific/DDESS Guam schools. The fair recruited community members to represent their college, university or service academy. More than 43 community members participated including the Director of Admissions from Loyola University, a United States Military Academy graduate, a U.S. Army recruiter, and Yongs Education Center representatives. The Republic of Korea Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., looks forward to hosting its Second Annual College Fair next year. If you are interested in participating, please send your requests to the College Fair Committee chairpersons, Joyce M. Diggs and Celeste Wilkerson at [email protected]. — Courtesy Photo

May 2-8

Today
Casey 730-7354 Henry 768-7724 Humphreys 753-7716 Hovey 730-5412 Kunsan 782-4987 Osan 784-4930 Red Cloud 732-6620 Stanley 732-5565 Yongsan I Yongsan II Yongsan III 738-7389
Jumper (PG13) 8:30 p.m. Prom Night (PG13) 7 p.m. Prom Night (PG13) 9 p.m. College Road Trip (G) 7 p.m. Semi-Pro (R) 8:30 p.m. Forgettting Sarah Marshell (R) 9:30 p.m. Semi-Pro (R) 9 p.m. Semi-Pro (R) 9 p.m. Forgettting Sarah Marshell (R) 8:30 p.m. Veggie Tales Movie (G) 6:30 p.m. Veggie Tales Movie (G) 6:30 p.m.

Saturday
College Road Trip (G) 8:30 p.m. Prom Night (PG13) 7 p.m. Prom Night (PG13) 9 p.m. 88 Minutes (R) 7 p.m. Jumper (PG13) 8:30 p.m 10,000 BC (PG13) 9:30 p.m. Jumper (PG13) 9 p.m Semi-Pro (R) 9 p.m. Forgettting Sarah Marshell (R) 8 p.m. College Road Trip (G) 6:30 p.m. College Road Trip (G) 6:30 p.m.

Sunday
College Road Trip (G) 8:30 p.m. Jumper (PG13) 7 p.m Prom Night (PG13) 9 p.m. Jumper (PG13) 7 p.m Jumper (PG13) 8:30 p.m Forgettting Sarah Marshell (R) 8:30 p.m. Semi-Pro (R) 9 p.m. Jumper (PG13) 7 p.m Forgettting Sarah Marshell (R) 8 p.m. College Road Trip (G) 6:30 p.m. College Road Trip (G) 6:30 p.m.

Monday
88 Minutes (R) 7:30 p.m. Semi-Pro (R) 7 p.m. Definately, Mabe (PG13) 9 p.m. Semi-Pro (R) 7 p.m. No Show Definately, Maybe (PG13) 7 p.m. College Road Trip (G) 7 p.m. College Road Trip (G) 7 p.m. Semi-Pro (R) 7 p.m. Witless Protection (PG13) 6 p.m. Fool’s Gold (PG13) 6 p.m.

Tuesday
College Road Trip (G) 7:30 p.m. No Show Definately, Mabe (PG13) 9 p.m. 88 Minutes (R) 7 p.m. No Show Definately, Maybe (PG13) 7 p.m. Semi-Pro (R) 7 p.m. No Show Semi-Pro (R) 7 p.m. Witless Protection (PG13) 6 p.m. Fool’s Gold (PG13) 6 p.m.

Wednesday
Jumper (PG13) 7:30 p.m. No Show Step Up 2 (PG13) 9 p.m. Semi-Pro (R) 7 p.m. No Show 21 (PG13) 7 p.m. No Show Forgettting Sarah Marshell (R) 9 p.m. Jumper (PG13) 7 p.m Step Up 2 (PG13) 6 p.m. Semi-Pro (R) 6 p.m.

Thursday
Semi-Pro (R) 7:30 p.m. No Show Step Up 2 (PG13) 9 p.m. Jumper (PG13) 7 p.m Nim’s Island (PG) 6 p.m. 21 (PG13) 7 p.m. Forgettting Sarah Marshell (R) 7 p.m. Semi-Pro (R) 7 p.m. Jumper (PG13) 7 p.m Step Up 2 (PG13) 6 p.m. Semi-Pro (R) 6 p.m.

MAY 2, 2008 Area IV Worship Schedule
Protestant Services
Collective Protestant Sunday 10 a.m. 10:30 a.m. 10:30 a.m. 12:45 p.m. 1 p.m. 5 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 6:30 p.m. Camp Carroll Camp Walker Camp Henry Camp Walker Camp Carroll Camp Walker Camp Walker Camp Carroll Camp Carroll Camp Walker

CHAPLAIN
Chaplain (Capt.) Billy Graham 25th Transportation Battalion, Daegu

IMCOM-K • PAGE 15 http://imcom.korea.army.mil

Decisions, decisions! Consider your values when considering your choices
ensuing pregnancy. David is now in a quagmire of offenses. He still doesn’t stop, but sends for Uriah to come home on pass in order to sleep with his wife How do we decide what is right and what is wrong? and thereby cover up David’s recklessness. That plan Perhaps it comes from our upbringing, or perhaps failed. Uriah did not think it appropriate to enjoy the from what we learned in school. For us in the military, comfort of his wife while his buddies were deployed. it comes in part from the UCMJ. The Army also has a David even got Uriah intoxicated, but Uriah fell asleep set of values that define our attitudes to go along with in his doorway. David then sent Uriah back to the front those practices. The Army Values are Loyalty, Duty, with a sealed order for his commander to put Uriah at Respect, Selfless Service, Honor, Integrity and Personal the point during an offensive. During the assault, the Courage. These values must go beyond our minds and commander pulls back his troops and leaves Uriah in the fight. As expected, Uriah be planted in the core of our hearts. “My encouragement to you is that even after dies. David then makes Bathsheba his wife. I don’t think any of What could have us wakes up one day and making the wrong choices, there is still hope. decides to violate these Second chances are still available, even if been different if David would have made the values, but occasionally we some bad consequences still linger.” better decisions from the do just that. What happens beginning? for us to travel down the Fortunately David wrong path? Chaplain (Capt.) Billy Graham had a good friend, the 2 Samuel 12:15-16, 25th Transportation Battalion, Daegu Prophet Nathan. He was 18 states: “After Nathan able to admit to his lapse had gone home, the Lord struck the child that Uriah’s wife had born to David, and in judgment. His actions still brought consequences, he became ill. David pleaded with God for the child. He but God forgave him and allowed him to continue to fasted and went into his house and spent the nights lying rule. I am pretty certain that David did not wake up one morning and say to himself, “I think I will trash on the ground. On the seventh day the child died.” This consequence is the result of a series of David’s my life today.” Just as all of us don’t think, “What can bad decisions. Take a look at the process of David’s I do to ruin my life?” My challenge is to consider your decision-making process when you are tempted to decision-making that brought him to that point. 2 Samuel 11 declares that David sent his men into forget our values. Take the time to consider your actions combat operations while he remains in the rear. Next, in light of those values and the potential consequences while on the roof of his palace, he observes a beautiful of your attitudes and actions. My encouragement to woman bathing. Instead of turning away, he is informed you is that even after making the wrong choices, there that she is Bathsheba, Uriah’s wife. He further progresses is still hope. Second chances are still available, even if down the wrong path by sleeping with her and the some bad consequences still linger.

Church of Christ Collective Friday Korean Tuesday Korean Wednesday

Catholic Services
Mass Sunday Mass Sunday Mass Saturday 9 a.m. 11:30 a.m. 5 p.m. Camp Walker Camp Carroll Camp Walker

USAG-Deagu Chaplains Chaplain (Maj.) Edward Martin: [email protected], 764-5455 Chaplain (Capt.) Byung Min: [email protected], 765-8991

IMCOM-K • PAGE 16 http://imcom.korea.army.mil

FEATURE

THE MORNING CALM

U.S. Army Photo By Cpl. Im Jin-min, USAG Yongsan Public Affairs Office

Friendship week celebrated at U.S. Army Garrisons Yongsan, Humphreys

U.S. Army Photo By Andre Butler, USAG Humphreys Public Affairs Office

(Clockwise) (1) Sgt. Andrew Lopez, 9, 249th MI Detachment, and Cpl. Kim Joon-yong, 4-2 Aviation battles it out on the soccer field at USAG Humphreys. (2) Soldiers with HHC, USAG Yongsan, pose with their trophy for second place in friendship week soccer competition. Holding the trophy is Col. Dave Hall, USAG Yongsan commander. (3) Soldiers for 2nd Combat Aviation Bridage hit the Humphreys bowling alley during friendship week. (4) Staff Sgt. Noah Origel, Company D, 3-2 Aviation, slides to second while Cpl. Kim Jong-won and Spc. Bryan Luth, 194th Combat Service Sustainment Brigade, go for the ball at Humphreys Garrison. (5) Soldiers from the 501st Military Intelligence Battalion, Yongsan Garrison, sing the song “Hand in Hand” at the talent show April 24 during USAG Yongsan friendship week activities.

U.S. Army Photo By Andre Butler, USAG Humphreys Public Affairs Office

U.S. Army Photo By Spc. David Kanavel,USAG Humphreys Visual Information Office

U.S. Army Photo By Pfc. Lee Min-hwi, USAG Yongsan Public Affairs Office

NEWS U.S. Forces Korea celebrates Law Day with creative contests, fun run
IMCOM-K • PAGE 18 http://imcom.korea.army.mil
This year is the 50th anniversary of Law Day, first proclaimed by President Eisenhower on May 1, 1958. The theme for Law Day 2008 is “The Rule of Law: Foundation for Communities of Opportunity and Equity.” It is based on a speech given by President John F. Kennedy, who said: “By strengthening the rule of law we strengthen freedom and justice.” Contests were held at Seoul American Elementary School, Seoul American Middle School, and Seoul American High School to spread the message of Law Day. Seoul American Elementary School students participated in a contest for the poster that best captured this year’s theme. First place went to Sally Kamae, 5th Grade. Second place went to Christopher Grandinette, 3rd Grade. Third place went to Nicole Vogt, 5th Grade. The 1st Place poster will be the design for this week’s Law Day 5K Fun Run, which will be held May 3 in front of Collier Field House. The race starts at 9:30 a.m. Those interested in participating should arrive no later than 9 a.m. to sign up and receive a number. All participants must wear a safety vest. T-shirts are available free of charge for the first 300 runners to finish the race. For Seoul American Middle School, students competed in a 500-word essay contest on the theme. First place went to Andy McClung, 6th Grade. Second place went to Justin Risley, 6th Grade. Third place went to Carl Henderson, 6th Grade. For Seoul American High School, a 1000-word essay contest was held. First place went to Kiersten Pak-Blyzniak, 12th Grade. Second place went to Jungmin Escobar, 12th Grade. Third place went to Colleen Golden, 12th Grade. All of the winners – 1st, 2nd and 3rd place in each category – will receive additional prizes. Gen. B.B. Bell, USFK Commander, signed a proclamation designating May 1, 2008 as Law Day for U.S. Forces, Korea. In the document he said, “This year marks the fiftieth anniversary of Law Day. This year’s theme is, The Rule of Law: Foundation for Communities of Opportunity and Equity. I encourage all members of United States Forces, Korea to take a moment to think about how the rule of law impacts our lives and to consider our role in defending the law.”

THE MORNING CALM

The 1st place winner for Seoul American Elementary School’s Law Day poster contest is Sally Kamae, 5th Grade. Her drawing will be featured on the T-Shirts given to the first 300 runners to cross the finish line during the Law Day Fun Run scheduled for May 3 in front of Collier Field House on Yongsan.

Law Day’s award-winning essays: High school, junior high students share their views on law
by Kiersten Pak-Blyzniuk Grade 12
Theme: The Rule of Law- Foundation for Communities of Opportunity and Equity According to President Kennedy’s Law Day Proclamation on April 7, 1961, “no nation can remain free unless its people cherish their freedoms;” in order to do this, people must realize the existence of these freedoms and recognize the responsibility that they have to keep and preserve these liberties. The rule of law allows for people to recognize what freedom has granted them and to appreciate freedom, for America’s freedom was fought for and won. Today, American citizens are born into freedom and take their freedom for granted, forgetting what our forefathers have done for America to win and protect our freedom and basic human rights. Only in a democratic society, such as the United States, can people be governed under a rule of law rather than a rule of men. A democratic society allows for people to be governed equally; it is what connects the people and freedom. The rule of law, designed to protect the basic human rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, serves as a sanctuary, a safe haven, for the people. It protects the people from a too powerful government and bias or prejudice when implementing the law. It is justice. The rule of law stresses the importance of equity under the law by having the laws apply to everyone with no exceptions. Even those who make the laws do not have the prerogative of being exempt from the law. Also stressed is the easy accessibility to the law through the judicial system and courts, thus providing numerous opportunities for citizens to obtain access to the legal system. People can go to court, obtain standing in court and writs of certiorari, or sue, displaying the opportunities that exist for people to deal with the law and emphasizing that everyone has equal access to the law. It is ensured that the laws are enforced justly and efficiently. The rule of law is supported by the Constitution and the principles of the separation of powers and checks and balances. The Constitution states that in order for the Constitution to be amended, there needs to be a two-thirds vote in Congress, implementing equity by preventing bias towards one state or one individual. The principle separation of powers promotes the idea of federalism—the division of powers between the state government and federal government; ergo, the authority is shared and the federal government is prevented from becoming too powerful. Checks and balances assure that no one branch of the government will be more powerful than the other two branches. Each branch has freedom and justice in our own country and contribute by example to the goal of justice under law for all mankind.” What he meant is that law is the basis for equity in a community. If the law is not followed, the community will crumble into chaos. In countries like Iraq, there were no controlling laws with only limited local control. Iraq is a modern example of anarchy. Since they don’t follow one leader or government, they often disagree on laws. The laws should keep the people safe. Governments that have strong laws usually last longer. Their people stay organized and happy. Law is also important because it allows people to live together in one area and feel safe. Laws keep items from being stolen, property from the authority to perform ‘checks’ specified by the Constitution on the other two branches, creating a balance of power, and consequently, a fair government where equity is valued. What would the United States be without the rule of law? It would be similar to how America was during the pre-American Revolution era—the colonists being oppressed by the British, the colonists being treated unfairly and used to pay off the war debt through various taxes such as the Tea Act of 1773, and the colonists having no representation within the British Parliament. The American colonists had no opportunities to protect their freedom and they had no equality. With the birth of our country on July 4, 1776 emerged the achievement of equality and the basic freedoms established by Thomas Jefferson as “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” With equality and freedom as the basis for the founding of our government, the Constitution was written and later ratified in 1787, establishing the American government. The United States became the precedent for other countries to be governed by a rule of law instead of by a rule of men. Countries such as France (during the French Revolution), South Korea (after World War II) have all followed the United States’ example and have implemented the rule of law and the doctrine of equality. America continues to serve as a safe haven being damaged and trespassed, and people from being harmed. The law keeps honest people honest. In my recent travels to Cambodia, I learned about a flawed government with a very unjust set of laws. The society was run by a dictator who decided who lived and who died. The Khmer Rouge abided by a set of unjust laws. The Leader tortured and killed the educated and any others that challenged his laws. Those sets of law were not “for the people,” but against the people. In my opinion, Cambodia is better under its current leadership. The Cambodians have found that a law must help the people for it to be good and just. The rule of law is essential to all societies, especially democracies. We must let the world for the thousands of immigrants flooding through America’s borders, because of what it represents. Immigrants seek to escape persecution, discrimination, and inequality. They seek refuge in America, hoping to be treated equally, to have the same opportunities as American citizens, and to have better lives for themselves and for their children. America is the epitome of the protection and preservation of the citizens’ basic freedoms and equality, and our Lady Liberty further exemplifies this belief in equality and equal opportunity. Lady Liberty assures the immigrants that they will be protected, that they will receive equal treatment under the law, and that they will be welcome. Equal opportunity and equity are among the basic principles of what our government was founded upon. They are the principles of the rule of law, which is the basis of protecting, enforcing, and guaranteeing freedom and justice. The rule of law, the foundation upon which America was born, makes America what it is—a free, democratic society where everybody, regardless of skin color, race, ethnicity, or disability, is equal in the view of America and in the view of the law. Equality and opportunity to access the law will continue to be ensured through the rule of law and through our nation’s values of freedom and justice; “by strengthening the rule of law we strengthen freedom and justice.” know how important the rule of law is. We must tell people how law helps to keep a safe and calm environment. If people knew what kind of impact following the law had on their community, I am sure that they would attempt to obey the law as much as possible. When I grow up, I want to be a lawyer. For this reason, I enjoy reading about law, trying to understand why some laws are made, and the impact they have on society. My theory is that if we can make everyone more knowledgeable about the law, we can have a better world. Everyone would attempt to understand and obey the law more. You never know, maybe “by strengthening the rule of law, we can strengthen freedom and justice”, too.

by Andy McClung 6th Grade
Fifty years ago, President Eisenhower declared the first day of May to be the day that we celebrate “Law, the foundation of society.” On April 7, 1961, John F. Kennedy made a Presidential Proclamation that told people about the importance of law and how it helps manage society. All people in a society are responsible for the proper operation or execution of the law. He wrote that “no nation can remain free unless its people cherish their freedom.” President Kennedy was challenging the people to obey, set, and preserve the law. He wrote that “by strengthening the rule of law, we strengthen

Area III 5k fun run, walk one of many garrison activities
by Andre Butler USAG-H Public Affairs Office

USAG-H celebrates Earth Day with events throughout April
U S AG H U M P H R E Y S – A r m y community services played a vital role in this year’s Earth Day five kilometer Fun Run and Walk April 19. The run and walk served as a way for ACS officials to meet unit command teams face to face. “It wasn’t just a run,” said Alexander Carter, acting Family Advocacy Program manager and Exceptional Family Member Program manager. “This gave us the opportunity to introduce ourselves to Soldiers as well as to the unit commanders, sergeants major and first sergeants,” Carter said. “We needed meet the leaders because it’s their Soldiers we’re providing help for,” Carter said. During the event, Soldiers learned about services ACS and other Humphreys’ agencies provide them. A variety of information articles were on hand for attendees to view. “We had displays and information tables set up to inform the community about underage drinking and substance abuse,” said Camille Jackson, USAG Humphreys Army Substance Abuse Program coordinator. “We want to put a stop to underage drinking and provide awareness about alcohol abuse,” Jackson said. USAG Humphreys Sports Director Lonnie Herring said, “more than 350 Soldiers, Civilian Employees and Family members came out to support and participate in the run and walk.” “A lot of partners came together to make this year’s fun run and walk a success,” Herring said. “It is the largest run and walk we’ve had,” Herring said. “This year we provided streamers for military units who had 10 or more runners or walkers participating in the event,” Carter said. “We had 13 units,” Herring said.

MAY 2, 2008

AREA III

USAG-H • PAGE 21 http://imcom.korea.army.mil

Environmental highlights Earth Day
by Stacy A. Ouellette USAG-H Public Affairs Office U S AG H U M PH R EY S – U S AG Humphreys Environmental Divison has just completed a month-long celebration of Earth Day aimed at raising environmental awareness here. The environmental division opted for a month long celebration because one day was simply not enough to highlight and focus on environmental awareness. “We do a month long campaign to try and touch every one on the garrison from young children all the way up,” said Michael Stephenson, Environmental Quality Branch chief. “It is developed through about four months of planning and working with several different departments to try and get total involvement by USAG Humphreys and AREA III,” Stephenson said. Starting off the month was the environmental compliance officer council. In this meeting, appointed ECOs gather to share ideas, stories and learn from one another about keeping their units and areas to standard. The films “Happy Feet” and “An Inconvenient Truth” were both played with strong environmental messages at the post theater. Various activities for the students at the Humphreys American Elementary School were planned as well. Humphreys’ students took trips to the Humphreys’ water quality laboratory and Pyeongtaek City waste water plant located near the CPX gate. Students created posters and displayed them in the post library and community activity center, said Phillip Lopez, an Environmental Protection specialist. Dr. David Johnson, USAG Humphreys Environmental Division chief, viewed two events as most successful during this year’s campaign, students touring the USAG Humphreys water laboratory and a five kilometer fun run. More than 350 participants came out to support the run held April 19. Partnered with the Humphreys’ Morale, Welfare and Recreation Division, Soldiers,

More than 300 Soldiers, Family Members and Civilians supported a 5 kilometer Fun Run honoring Earth Day April 19. (below) As part of a month long campaign to celebrate Earth Day, the USAG Humphreys Environmental Divison hosted a field trip for Humphreys American Elementary School students to visit the waste water treatment plant and water quality labratory, April 3. — U.S. Army Photo By by Phillip Lopez

Civilians and Family members took to the road to honor this occasion. The first Earth Day was held in 1970 originating through Sen. Gaylord Nelson, (D) Wisconsin, as a national day of observance of environment problems. Earth day was created in order to bring world wide awareness to global problems such as: global warming, air pollution, recycling and destruction of the rain forest, said Stephenson. “Earth Day provides an opportunity to rededicate ourselves to being conscientious stewards of the Korean land entrusted to us,” Johnson said. As the new buzz phrase “going green” becomes a part of popular culture around the world, focusing on an enduring program here continues long after Earth Day festivities end. “My hope is that the USAG Humphreys community gains a greater awareness of the garrison’s environmental programs and that it takes total community involvement to be good environmental stewards,” Johnson said.

April Awareness Month Partners
Morale, Welfare and Recreations Sports Department Army Community Service Family Advocacy Program Child Abuse Awareness Month ACS Family Advocacy Program Sexual Assault Prevention Month Army Substance Abuse Program Alcohol Awareness Month DPW Environmental Division

USAG-H • PAGE 22 www.imcom.korea.army.mil

News & Notes
USFK ALERT USFK officials are asking its servicemembers and beneficiaries to use caution when eating in non-USFK approved establishments due to a recent outbreak of the Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 Virus (HPAI-H5N1 Virus) in the Republic of Korea. All dishes containing chicken and/or eggs should only be consumed if properly cooked. The USFK is taking these precautions even as the Korean government aggressively works to contain the outbreak. Inspiration Volunteer Award and Dinner Ceremony Come walk down the red carpet and see who will win the USAG Humphreys Volunteer of the Year Award May 2 from 6 to 9 p.m. the USAG Humphreys Community Activity Center. Volunteers will be treated to a free dinner. Guests or other attendees must pay $14 per person. Two meal choices are available. Call 753-8401. Free Lunch for Military Spouses In saluting Military Spouses, Alaska Mining Company will offer all spouses (accompanied by a Soldier or a photo of your Soldier and I.D.) to a FREE lunch buffet May 9 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. For all that you sacrifice the United Club honors you on this day. BOSS Beach Blast 2008 Single and unaccompanied Soldiers visit Daecheon Beach June 6-8 for a fun filled two day event to include beach and water activities, food and lots of fun. Early registration deadline is May 18. Cost per person to include two nights lodging, ticket to water park and meals is $99 - $149 per person. Cost after May 19 is $125-$175. Full payment is due at the time of registration. Call the CAC at 753-8825 for more details. Pet Adoption Fair and Clinic The Osan Vet Clinic will have an adoption fair and clinic at the CAC May 19. Bring your pets by for registration, shots and updates or come by to look at pets for adoption. Call 784-6614 for more information. USAG-Humphreys Sergeant Audie Murphy Club The USAG-H Sergeant Audie Murphy Club is looking for SAMC and Sergeant Morales Club members. Monthly meetings are held the third Wednesday of every month. Please contact Sgt. 1st Class (P) Grandison at 753-6136 or Sgt. 1st Class LawsonHurt at 753-7978 for more information. Inspector General Openings The Eighth United States Army Inspector General has immediate openings for officers wanting to become Inspector Generals. Vacancies are for Majors and branch qualified captains. Positions can be up to two years with command sponsorship. Point of contact is Lt. Col. Ed Hogan at 725-6739 or Col. Michael Mahoney at 7234006, email: [email protected]. mil or [email protected] Free Bowling on Fridays Military in uniform can enjoy free bowling every Friday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Humphreys Strike Zone and Long Bowling Centers. The snack bars will be open for your convenience. Call 754-5722 for more information. Please Send Us Stories and Photos To submit info for publishing in The Morning Calm Weekly, USAG Humphreys common pages, call 754-6132, 8847 or 8598 -- or e-mail [email protected].

ACS hosts Family Wellness Day
by Andre Butler USAG-H Public Affairs of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, shaken baby syndrome is a type of inflicted traumatic brain injury that happens when a baby is violently shaken. “Injury prevention of children is very important, and we help parents learn to manage stress when dealing with their

AREA III

THE MORNING CALM

network for the first time and they don’t know where to go to receive information or help in this new environment,” Carter said. USAG HUMPHREYS – The United “I didn’t know the dental clinic here cleans States Army Garrison Humphreys Army children teeth once a month,” said Melissa Community Services teamed up with Contreres, a parent attending wellness day. community agencies April 21 to host “It’s good to know these services are offered a Family Wellness to us. Today has been Day at Humphreys very informative, and American Elementary I hope people come School. out to support the We l l n e s s D a y different agencies was held “to provide because it looks like information to a lot of hard work parents about how to went into putting this keep families healthy,” together,” Contreres said Alexander said. Carter, acting Family “And that’s why Advocacy Program we are here,” Carter manager and said. Events like Exceptional Family Family Wellness Day Member Program are offered quarterly manager. through Humphreys “This is also a way ACS. for other Humphreys’ “We host events agencies to get together like this at least once and network and every three months show what services to let people know they have available Sarah Collins, 3, plays with Pluggie the Fire Plug at Humphreys Elementary School while Yi, these agencies and for the community,” Sang-chol, a Humphreys firefighter, operates the controls. — U.S. Army Photo By Andre Butler services are available Carter said. for Soldiers, Civilian Representatives from the USAG children,” Dumoulin said. employees and their Family members. Humphreys Safety Office to the Red Cross USAG Humphreys Dental Clinic General When Soldiers know their families are being were on hand with displays to educate Dentist Capt. Felicia Swinney gave parents taken care of and supported, it adds to their parents and answer questions regarding their insight on children’s teeth and gums. combat readiness,” Carter said. particular area of expertise. “Our services are free and we care about “I’m here to talk to parents about neglect “Our displays range from information and maltreatment of children dental health,” everyone in our community -- we are about shaken baby syndrome to children’s Swinney said. “They need to know how to here for them. Family Advocacy is about nutritional health,” said Jean Dumoulin, teach kids how to properly take care of their providing resources needed to prevent 18th Medical Command Area III Health teeth and practice good dental hygiene.” family breakdowns. That’s our reason for Promotion coordinator. Although the programs are in place to help having events like this,” Carter said. “If “We teach classes about shaken baby parents at Humphreys, some don’t know the you look around you see people talking and syndrome to educate parents on the effects,” avenues to take in getting the help needed. finding out what we can offer them. It’s all Dumoulin said. “In this community you have a lot of about the Soldiers, Civilians and Family According to the National Institute families away from their normal support members -- we are working for them.”

HAES thanks honor choir for contributions
Fun-filled year ends with showcase
by Diane Hobler HAES Librarian

USAG HUMPHREYS – Sing, sing a song. . . that’s what the Humphreys American Elementary School Honor Choir does best. This group of talented fourth through sixth grade students has been working all year with music teacher Angi Shoff to develop their singing skills. Shoff said she sponsors this activity in order to give students at HAES another opportunity to express themselves musically through song and dance. She also feels that experience in honor choir helps build unity, teach students to work in a group and develop within them the characteristics of effective leaders. The honor choir doesn’t entertain only HAES students, but has performed at many USAG Humphreys community events such as the Christmas tree lighting ceremony, African American Heritage show, United Club meetings and more.

It’s one for the money, two for the show . . . the HAES Honor Choir performed “Blue Suede Shoes” at a recent PTO meeting -- (above) an end of year photo for all. — Photo By Diane Hobler Their final concert of the year, “Put on Your Dancing Shoes,” was an energetic performance showcasing both their singing and dancing skills. All the music lovers and aspiring musicians of HAES want to say thanks to the choir for the hard work this year to entertain and inspire others.

MAY 2, 2008

AREA III
PARCEL 2 MP HILL PARCEL 1 PARCEL K PARKING GARAGE

USAG-H • PAGE 23 http://imcom.korea.army.mil

SUPER GYM

An aerial view of Humphreys shows the massive scale of the installation’s construction projects. USAG-H is rapidly transforming with about $2 billion worth of new facilities in the design phase. Most construction is being done on Parcels One, Two, and K. — U.S. Army Photo Illustration By Bob McElroy and Andre Butler

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Workers will drive them to depths of up to 100 feet. Next come concrete caps on top of each pile and then steel-reinforced concrete beams connecting each of the caps. When it is complete it will form a sturdy grid which will support the weight of the barracks. Davis said that the idea of using piles to support buildings is very old; many buildings in the Italian city of Venice sit atop wooden piles that have lasted for centuries. While the technique is old some of the materials used today, such as reinforced concrete, are relatively new, Davis said. We’ve used reinforced concrete for about the last 150 years, he noted. The new barracks should be finished in about two years, said Greg H. Reiff, the Resident Engineer of the FED’s Pyeongtaek Resident Office. From the outside the new barracks will resemble the recently-built barracks on nearby MP Hill but inside they will be designed according to the One-plus-One concept: two Soldiers live in a module where each Soldier has a private room but they share a bathroom and kitchen. Each building will house 302 Soldiers. Utilities and roads linking the new barracks will come later, Davis said. As the soil continues to settle on Parcel One and becomes ready for construction more facilities will rise from the new ground during Phase 2 of construction. Davis said that contractors will build three vehicle maintenance facilities and a communications center on the land next to MP Hill. Also planned are the first of several family-housing towers, an elementary school and a high school. Some of the facilities will be built on land known as Parcel K, an L-shaped 110acre tract that wraps around the western boundary of Parcel One.

The construction that’s about to begin on Parcels One and K isn’t the only change coming to Humphreys Garrison--several other projects are about to open or are in the works. Each is designed to update existing facilities and enhance the quality of life here. Davis said that in all there is about $2 billion worth of new facilities in the design phase. The Community Fitness Center or “Super Gym” should open within the next two months, Davis said. The new wing of the Humphreys Lodge, also scheduled to open in approximately two months will nearly double the existing lodge’s room count. The Zoekler Station area will see the opening of its new gym, two new Soldier Barracks, company and battalion headquarters and a running track and athletic field. Other projects on the horizon include: A new 40,000 square foot education center next to the new Child Development Center.  Another parking structure with a capacity of about 400 vehicles. A new barracks complex to be built on the site currently occupied by the garrison’s Directorate of Public Works. An Aviation Intermediate Maintenance facility next to Desiderio Army Airfield. The Food, Beverage and Entertainment Complex located next to the Humphreys Lodge on Washington Drive. Davis said that the new construction also includes a new and improved road network, including a four-lane road that will run beneath the Sky bridge which connects the Super Gym with its parking garage. The bottom line is that in the next several years, in addition to building a new post on new land, the Army will tear down the old post and rebuild it. “In ten years you might not recognize it; it will be a very different place than what we see right now,” Davis concluded.

Behind the Scenes of Friendship Week
(Clockwise) (1) KATUSA and U.S. Soldiers show appreciation toward children from the Pyeongtaek City Culture Center for their performance. (2) Warriors for the culture center show Soldiers the proper way of shooting bow and arrows. (3) A female warrior demonstrates traditional sword skills during a performance at Independence Park during friendship week. (5) Spc. Charles Hemphill, from the Provider Grill Dining Facility, tends the grill during a lunch served as part of KATUSA and U.S. Soldiers Friendship Week’s festivities. —U.S. Army Photos By Andre Butler

MAY 2, 2008

Camp Carroll KATUSA, U.S. Soldiers enjoy 2008 Friendship Week celebration
in person was amazing. I really thought it was amazing how high they jumped in the air and hit their target with precision. I’m into martial arts so now that I got a taste of Korean-style martial arts I want to learn it myself.” 498th Battalion Commander, Lt. Col. Charles R. Hamilton, was guest speaker for the opening ceremonies. “KATUSAs play a significant role in ensuring the mission is met here in Korea, not just for the military but the military and civilian families as well”, said 501st HROC Terroian Patrick. “I didn’t know that the US Soldiers and KATUSA Soldiers have been working so long and been through so much together,” said Wallace. The way KATUSAs talk about their Father’s and Grandfather’s experiences as KATUSAs reminds me of the way my family talks about the history of my family in the military.” Upon conclusion of the opening ceremonies, Soldiers went outside to start the week of festivities with a guidion race. Ten commands participated in the sports completion: the 1-44 Air Defense Artillery Battalion, 16th MEDLOG, 498th Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, 501st Sustainment Battalion, 293th Signal Company and USAG Daegu, Camp Carroll 168th Medical Company, 618th Dental Company, Material Support-Center-Korea, Bravo Company and the 524th Military Intelligence Company. The guidon race

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501st STB KATUSA and U.S. Soldiers run flanking guidon bearer with motivation spirit and esprit de corps during the guidon race. by Samuel G. Hudson USAG Daegu Public Affairs CAMP CARROLL – Apr. 21, two families gathered in the Camp Carroll Crown Jewel Gym for the beginning of a family reunion of U.S. Soldiers and KATUSA Soldiers. Now if this sounds a little strange, put it in military terms: On Apr. 21 at 0900, U.S. and KATUSA Soldiers gathered in the Camp Carroll Crown Jewel Gym for the beginning of the 2008 KATUSA and U.S. Soldier Friendship Week. It was a family reunion because the closeness of the U.S. and KATUSA relationship was evident as joking and laughter filled the air as they planned their strategies for the upcoming sports events. The friendship and alliance of the KATUSA and U.S. Soldier is invaluable. The “KATUSA and U.S. Soldier Friendship Week program that commences today will promote mutual understanding of each other and cultivate unity between KATUSA and U.S. Soldiers through various sports and cultural activities,” said 501st Sustainment Brigade ROKA Commander, Major Dae Ho Kim. The contribution to the U.S. military and U.S. community here in Korea from the KATUSAs can be seen and felt throughout Korea. “I really can’t tell the difference between the US and Korean Soldiers because they do everything that the US Soldiers do.”When there is a crisis or situation on the base or off the base that affects or involves the U.S. community, they are right there to help out”, said Daegu American School, Gifted Education teacher Celeste S. Kimble. “Friendship is a word that everyone uses but not everyone knows the meaning. The KATUSAs from what I have seen and experience they not only know the meaning but live it every day, “said Kimble. “I just want to say thank you.” The opening ceremony of 2008 KATUSA and U.S. Soldier Friendship Week was filled with martial arts demonstrations from the 201st Special Assault Brigade and Kyungdong College Taekwondo Demonstration Team rhythmic dancing and other events. New to korea, 168th Motor-Pool Logistical Specialist, Pfc. Jeffrey S. Wallace said, “I see a lot of martial arts on TV, and to see it

was the only competition in which all commands participated at the same time. This was also the most energetic and lively competition of the week. The guidon is a great source of pride and motivation for the unit, stemming from ancient times. Should the guidon drop, the guidon-holder must receive some type of punishment, normally in the form of push-ups. Other units may attempt to steal the guidon to demoralize or antagonize the unit. Veteran soldiers know not to give up the guidon to anyone outside their unit, but new recruits may be tempted by the Sergeant Major into relinquishing it, especially during a battalion run. The 144th ADA was victorious, with the 501st STB coming in second. No one was a loser in this competition, because they all support each other. Personnel from the perspective battalions flanked the guidion runners when they came down the final straightaway, motivating them and sometimes calling cadence. “This week was a great opportunity to see and experience the differences in culture and break down the barriers between the two countries with games, getting to know each other away from the day-to-day work schedule,” said Directorate of Logistic, – See KATUSA Week Page 26 –

Martial artists from the Kyung-dong College Taekwondo Demonstration team seems to run on air while demolishing wooden boards with their feet. — U.S. Army Photos By Samuel G. Hudson

DoDDs Korea baseball teams play at Samsung Lions home field
by Jang Jin-young USAG Daegu Public Affairs DAEGU – Baseball teams from DoDDSKorea schools including Seoul American High School (SAHS), Osan American High School (OAHS) and Daegu American School (DAS) enjoyed friendly games with each other at the Samsung Lions’ home field, Daegu Citizens’ Stadium, Apr. 26. The AllStar/Friendship game pitted Daegu against Kyongsang Middle School. Seoul defeated Osan 9-6, Daegu beat Osan 5-2 and the Kyongsang Middle School baseball team defeated Daegu, 5-6. Although the teams played to win, the true goal of the day’s event was to promote good relations among them.

“It was really fun, and great to play with the Korean team at Samsung Lions’ stadium,” said Mattew Solseth, DAS catcher. “They are really very skilled. We played hard and they played hard. It was really fun. And I was really happy that I could play games at a professional stadium. Playing baseball at a professional stadium was totally different.” “This is a big experience for kids who usually play games at a small playground,” said Daegu Coach Bill Riggs. “The size of the stadium is bigger than usual. So, it’s a good chance for our players to see how it feels playing a game at a professional stadium. Some may never play baseball games again – See Baseball Page 26 –

DAS pitcher and 9th grader, Paul O’Leary pitches during the All-Star/Friendship game. Kyongsang Middle Scholl baseball team defeated DAS 6-5. — U.S. Army Photo By Jang Jin-young

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News & Notes
Factory and Cultural Tour There will be a Factory and Cultural Tour held May 9. Participants will visit Daedun Mountain by cable car, Hite beer factory and Jeonju Hanok village. Breakfast and lunch will be provided and Hite beer factory will provide a beer tasting opportunity, beer for adults and soft drinks for the underaged. For information, contact Community Relations Officer Chong Yong-kon at DSN 768-6907 or [email protected]. Commissary Awareness Day BOSS holds Commissary Awareness Day 9 from a.m. – 12 p.m., May 16 at the Commissary parking lot on Camp Walker. A variety of events are planned for the day. For information, call Spc. Aleshia Fenner at DSN 7644426. Spirit Warrior Men’s Conference Spirit Warrior Men’s Conference will be held 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. May 10 at Camp Walker’s Soldier Memorial Chapel. Dr. Chuck Stecker will participate together and continental breakfast will be served. For information, call Chaplain (Capt.) William E. Graham at DSN 768-6140. 233rd United States Army Birthday Ball To celebrate the 233rd United States Army Birthday, the Army Ball will be held 6 p.m. June 14 at InterBurgo Hotel in Daegu. Ticket price is 40,000 won. For information, call Spc. Natalie E. Kapteyn at DSN 7688622. 2ID Needs Vocalists The second Infantry Division “Warrior” Band needs male and female vocalists. Soldier who want to be a vocalist must be able to sing the National Anthen in Bb (starting pitch is an F), the Warrior March, and the Army Song, present a professional appearance and meet the standards set by Army Regulation 600-9, obtain the consent of their command to be released to the band before auditioning and have at least nine months left before DEROS. For information, call Staff Sgt. Chad McGill at DSN 732-6695 or 010-5846-6426. Haedong Gum-Do There is a traditional Korean swordfighting called ‘Haedong Gum-Do’ class every Monday and Wednesday at Camp Walker’s Youth Center. It helps make healthy mind and healthy body and to improve self defense. 6 – 6:50 p.m. is for beginners and 7 – 7:50 is for the advanced. For information or signing up, call Youth Center Central Registry Office at DSN 764-5298. Daegu Website For local news you can use, visit USAG Daegu’s website at http://ima. korea.army.mil/areaIV/sites/local/

Soldiers learn Korean culture through Daegu City Tour
by Sgt. Jung Seo-jin 19th ESC Public Affairs DAEGU – Misty rain fell in Daegu as KATUSA and U.S Soldiers and family members gathered at Camps Walker and Henry to participate in a Daegu City Tour, April 23 as part of KATUSA and U.S. Soldiers Friendship Week 2008. The trip was planned around historical and cultural center visits including the Daegu National Museum, Daegu Bangjja Yugi (Korean Bronze Ware) Museum and Donghwasa Temple. During the trip, participants were given an hour of free time to see the museum or the temple where they could explore area of interest. KATUSA Soldiers also answered questions that U.S. Soldiers had about traditional Korean culture. Daegu National Museum, which is located on Suseong-gu, was built in December 1994, and holds approximately 23,000 relics from the Daegu and Gyungbuk areas. This museum plays a pivotal role in researching, surveying and preserving the region’s cultures. Tour participants learned that the museum was divided into three different sections; archaeology, art history and traditional folk life. Soldiers had a chance to observe Korean culture by viewing displays of old Korean houses, scenes of traditional Korean marriages and Korean school life. Many children from Korean kindergarten and elementary schools came to visit and asked U.S Soldiers for an autograph. “The museum was very educational and it was also nice to see little kids from the elementary school, who looked like they also came for a tour,” said 19th ESC Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear, Spc. Claudia Cabero. The next destination of the tour was Daegu Bangjja Yugi (Korean Bronze Ware) Museum. Bangjja Yugi is Korean traditional bronze ware made by copper and tin, 78 parts to 22, and is pounded and hit repeatedly by a hammer to draw it out thinly to form a shape. Daegu Bangjja Yugi museum is the first bronze ware-specialized museum built to preserve the Bangjja Yugi. The museum holds 1,480 items of Yugi of 275 types. The museum was divided into three different categories; Yugi room, donated items room and reproduction room. Not only were there exhibition rooms, but also a playground area filled with Korean traditional games, including a Korean

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traditional seesaw and the game of ‘Yut’. “I would have liked to have more time at different museums because there is a lot I would like to see,” said 19th ESC 4th Support Detatchment, Spc. Jason D. Wilgus. After visiting Daegu Bangjja Yugi Museum, the group arrived at Donghwasa Temple, which is located on Mt. Palgong. Soldiers had a chance to see a Korean Buddhist temple, and a 200 foot-tall statue of Buddha. “The most impressive thing was the Buddha statue and large temple. The tomb with all the warriors going around it was also pretty impressive,” said 19th ESC staff judge advocate, Pfc. Tahron D. Davis. “It was also interesting to be able to go into the temple and pray,” Cabero added. “The trip was a good experience for KATUSA and U.S. Soldiers to go on and share time together. I was a good experience for the KATUSAs, a lot of them are from different areas of Korea so many of them have not been to temples or museums located in Daegu. It also gives them a chance to learn about Daegu,” said 19th ESC support operations, Cpl. Hwang Kyoo-won.

25th Transportation Battalion Lieutenant Colonel Driver, Jang Hyun-chul explains Korean traditional bronze ware to 25th Trans. Bn. S1, Delilah J. Quintero at Daegu Bangjja Yugi Museum during the Daegu City Tour, April 23. — U.S. Army Photo By Cpl. Na Kyung-chul

KATUSA Week
NCOIC, Camp Carroll, Sgt. 1st Class Anthony C. Bowdrie II. “I am confident that through this event, ROK and U.S. Soldiers will become both friends and companions,” said Kim. 501st SSB Mobility Officer, CW2 Bridget L. Conway, said “This week is about camaraderie, teamwork, esprit de corpsand this week met all those goals and then some. This is my second time experiencing KATUSA and US Friendship Week and it seems to get better every year.” Another popular event for the Soldiers was the Factory and Cultural Tour sponsored by, the Korean Foreigner Tourist Facility Association. U.S and KATUSA Soldiers got a chance to explore the museums of Daegu for a day. “I was impressed because Soldiers were very interested in Korean culture and were eager to take pictures. It was interesting to see that no matter the nationality, language and culture, we have a similar sense of beauty,” said ROKA Staff Office, Sgt. Choi Joon-ki.

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Soldiers toured the Daegu National Mu s e u m , B a n g j j a Yu g i Mu s e u m , Donghwasa Temple. “These cultural trips with my fellow U.S. and KATUSA Soldiers are important because they give us an opportunity to confirm the friendship between KATUSA and U.S. Soldiers and bring about mutual understanding of each others’ culture,” said USAG Daegu ROKA Staff Office Cpl. Seo Dong-chul. “Touring the museums and seeing our history together allows U.S. Soldiers to interact with us to understand the events of the past and ask any questions that they may have, and gives us an opportunity to promote Korean culture to those who do not know about it.” Wallace said, that not having a KATUSA in the motor-pool where he works makes it a little harder to get to know any KATUSA and answer questions he has about Korea and the KATUSAs.” “This week has allowed me the opportunity to meet many KATUSAs and learn a lot about Korea, KATUSA and

most importantly establish KATUSA Battle Buddies,” Wallace emphasized. Here are the final results of the 2008 KATUSA and U.S. Soldier Friendship Week Camp Carroll Sport competition: Jump Rope 1. 6th Ordnance Co. 2. 293rd Signal Co. Guidon Race 1. 1-44th ADA 2. 501st STB Softball 1. 293rd Signal Co. 2. 1-44th ADA Basketball 1. 1-44th ADA Team 2 2. 293rd Signal Co. Kick-Volleyball 1. 6th Ordnance Co. 2. 498th CSSB Soccer 1. 1-44 ADA Team 1 2. 16th MEDLOG Tug-of-War 1. 498th CSSB 2. 293rd Signal Co. Samsung Lions stadium,” said Choi. “I helped DAS borrow the stadium and arranged a baseball game with Kyonsang Middle School baseball team for the All-Star/Friendship game. I am sure that through baseball, children in the Army community and their Korean counterparts can be closer to, and understand, each other.”

Baseball
after this year. This is an once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. That’s the big deal for them. So, we decided to have this year’s DoDDS Korea baseball games and All-Star/Friendship game at Samsung Lions’ stadium.” Taegu Broadcasting Corporation baseball commentator, Choi Jong-moon, who made

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possible a baseball clinic with Samsung Lions baseball players March 22, also helped make the DoDDS Korea baseball games and All-Star/Friendship game a reality. “I heard DAS wanted to hold the DoDDS Korea baseball games and the All-Star/Friendship game this year at

MAY 2, 2008

Daegu families gather for Community Family Day
and Developmental Intervention Services (EDIS), Adolescent Substance Abuse Counseling Service (ASACS), Family Advocacy Program (FAP), the Vet Clinic and Community Bank set up tables to provide a variety of information to participants. In spite of a little cold weather, many families participated in and supported the Family Day and the parking lot was crowded with people. “It was a great event,” said 36th Signal Battalion Company Commander, Capt. Jason A. Neubig. “Plenty of activities for the family and children were prepared by a lot of organizations here. We got great information, also.” A variety of demonstrations such as ballet, gymnastics and Tae-Kwon Do, and contests like tricycle races, bubble gum bubble-blowing contest and a hula hoop contest provided a fun day for children. USAG Daegu BOSS volunteer, Spc. Aleshia A. Fenner, participated in the day’s events as a volunteer to amuse children. “I was Big Bird for kids today,” said Fenner. “At first, kids were scared at me, but they opened their mind and took photos with me later. The Family Day is a very good event for people to go out together with their family and support the community.” The 188th Military Police Company and USAG Daegu Emergency and Fire Services supported the day to be closer with community members and teach them about safety. “Our display shows the dangers of drug abuse,” said 188th MP Co., Cpl. Yoon Hyung-sub. “We displayed many kinds of drugs so that people can recognize harmful drugs as part of Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE). We also show people that Military Police and the Special Reaction Team (SRT) are here for the community’s safety and security.” “A part of being a family is fire safety,” said USAG Daegu Assistance Fire Chief, Fire Prevention, Andrew M. Allen. “We want families to be safe and to use fire safety all the time. We displayed equipments here to show all about firefighters, and child can experience spraying water with a nozzle. The message of the display is fire safety.” Community Family Day is held by many organizations in the community annually, and will continue next year. “This is a great event for the community to promote families and safe care of children,” said Director, USAG Daegu Family, Morale, Welfare and Recreation, David L. Lucia. “It’s an opportunity to share ideas, fun, excitement and prizes at various events.”

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A child shakes hands with the AFN Eagle during USAG Daegu Community Family Day. Several events and contests were enjoyed by kids during the event. by Cpl. Na Kyung-chul USAG Daegu Public Affairs CAMP WALKER – United States Army Garrison Daegu’s ‘Community Family Day’ was held to celebrate the Month of the Military Child and also to heighten awareness of Child Abuse Prevention Month, April 26 at the Kelly Fitness Center parking lot, Camp Walker. Many organizations including Child and Youth Services (CYS), Women’s Infant and Children’s Overseas (WICO), Educational

Children participating in a bubble gum bubble-blowing contest strive to create the biggest bubble to win first prize in the contest. — U.S. Army Photos By Cpl. Na Kyung-chul

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by Ann-Katherine E. Kimble USAG Daegu Public Affairs

DAS students get hands-on education at environmental facilities
CAMP CARROLL – During the rush of your morning routine, after brushing your teeth and taking a shower, more than likely you forget about the water you just consumed. “Over the course of a 15-minute shower, the average American uses 32 gallons of water,” said United States Army Garrison Daegu Environmental Quality Branch Chief, Chuck Harper. For many of us, our showers tend to be much longer, meaning we waste much more water, usually from starting the shower minutes before we actually get in. “Training starts at an early age and we want to take every opportunity to educate the future leaders of the world on environmental stewardship and the sustainable practices we use each day in order to protect the environment t o d a y a n d c o n s e r ve o u r re s o u rc e s for future generations,” said USAG Daegu Department of Public Works Environmental Branch Chief, Robert Chartier. To that end, students from four science classes at Daegu American School ventured to Camp Carroll on Earth Day, April 22, to learn innovative ways to save and preserve Earth’s natural resources. The tour included visits to the water treatment plant, water purification center, recycling station and hazardous materials facility. “I had no idea how complicated it was to purify the water we use on a daily basis,” said DAS Senior Monica Edland. At the

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DAS High School History Teacher, Nancy Magoon (left) and DAS Senior, Antonio Harris both get their hands dirty doing the right thing, recycling cans at the DPW recycling center. — U.S. Army Photo By Ann-Katherine E. Kimble recycling station, cardboard boxes, soda cans and spare wood pieces are broken down for recycling. Freshmen Angela Robinet added, “I didn’t realize how easily everything can be broken down and reused.” She went on to say, “Instead of throwing away soda cans, it’s just as easy to just recycle them, as well as recycling the notebook paper we use at school, that we usually end up throwing away by the end of the school year anyway.” The students were moved to a safe distance to view the mulcher demonstration. When the machine was turned on and the scrap wood loaded, wood pieces flew everywhere and branches and limbs were transformed into fine wood chips. The mulch will be used throughout USAG Daegu installations, also providing a cost avoidance to having to land-fill, at a cost of about $ 100,000 year. A few miles away at the hazardous materials facility which handles all hazardous materials throughout DAS students did a walk-through of different connex boxes which hold materials such

as paint, antifreeze and cleaning solutions. After a demonstration of how these materials are broken down and diluted, DAS students went to lunch, practicing newly-found recycling methods. “It’s easy to recycle here in Daegu, because the garbage cans are already marked for recycling; all you have to do is just do it”, said DAS Senior Dan Ray. From picking up litter on the sidewalk, to sorting their garbage in stead of throwing it all into one disposal bin, it was clear at the food court that the students of Daegu American School are making an effort to preserve the Earth. “Now that I understand the benefits of recycling, it makes me more willingly dispose of my garbage the right way,” stated DAS Senior Antonio Harris. The trip concluded with the students planting a tree near the newly-renovated outdoor swimming pool, to symbolize Earth Day. “We would like students to leave with an understanding that the garrison does have an environmental program and they and their families are an integral part. Furthermore, we would like them to understand that even the smallest effort in conserving our resources when compounded by numbers over time really makes a difference,” said Chartier. If anyone is interested in taking tours of USAG Daegu Environmental facilities, please call 768-8730. The tours provide a realistic first-hand look beyond just rhetoric of the existing processes that serve to protect our environment for future generations.

MAY 2, 2008

8th Army holds marathon at Carey Fitness Center
by Spc. Alun Thomas USAG-RC Public Affairs USAG - CASEY— Despite cold temperatures and constant drizzle, more than 60 competitors took part in the 2008 Eighth Army Full and Half Marathon at Carey Fitness Center, April 26, featuring runners from all four areas of the Korean peninsula. Runners in the half marathon ran approximately 13.1 miles, while those running the full marathon were required to run 26.2 miles; the course circling the entire USAG-Casey and Camp Hovey area. Kim Pok Man, USAG-RC sports specialist, said a total of 61 runners signed up for the event, 40 running the half marathon, the other 21 competing in the full marathon. The race was an individual competition including both men and women and was divided into eight age categories, ranging from Men’s and Women’s Open, 25 years of age and under, to Men’s and Women’s Senior, age 46 years and older. Winner of the full marathon was Spc. Jeong Kim, 121 Combat Support Hospital, USAG-Yongsan, in 3 hours and 3 minutes. Winner of the half marathon was 1st Lt. Alexander Pagon, Special Operations Command Korea, USAG-Yongsan, in a time of 1:18:23. Pagon said he trained extensively for the race and has been competing in marathons regularly since he joined the Army. “Today was a fabulous day for a race, it was nice and cool,” Pagon said. “It’s a tough course though, especially when you hit the hill around mile eight. That was a real gut check.” Pagon said he has been running constantly for the last two years but finds every race a massive challenge. “As you keep getting better the pace keeps getting faster, and the challenge is to maintain that pace,” Pagon said. Also competing in the half marathon was Staff Sgt. Braulio Silva, Camp Stanley, Bravo Company, 304th Integrated Theater Signal Battalion, who said despite pulling a calf muscle during the marathon, he achieved his goal of completing the race in less than two hours along with other members of his company. “We didn’t have a lot of time to train for this, but we’re happy we finished and met our goals,” Silva said. “We can’t do stuff like this without the support of our command unit; however, it was only with their support we were able to accomplish what we did today.” Silva said he and others in his company trained separately at regular physical training during early mornings in order to prepare for the marathon. “About mile five or six I pulled my calf, and at three different points I had to walk,” Silva said. “But I stretched out and didn’t quit, so with the support of partners pulling me along, I was able to finish.” Awards for those finishing in first, second and third were given after the half marathon, with mementos awarded also for all participants.

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Cho Hyun Song, (number 113) USAG-Casey Korean Security Guard, battles Jeff Furner, (number 204) Seoul American Elementary School, for 11th place in a furious finish during the Eighth Army Half Marathon, April 26, at USAG-Casey Carey Fitness Center. — U.S. Army Photo By Spc. Alun Thomas

U.S., Korean Soldiers celebrate sisterhood, friendship at U.S. Army Garrison Red Cloud
by Spc. Leith Edgar 2nd Infantry Division Public Affairs USAG-RED CLOUD—The Soldiers of Division Special Troops Battalion and 2nd Logistics Support Command celebrated their first year of sisterhood April 18 on USAG-Red Cloud . The event marked one year since the 2nd LOGCOMM and DSTB signed a memorandum of agreement to promote mutual understanding and friendship. The memorandum of agreement, which consists of six articles, covers the two parties’ working relationship, joint training and annual celebrations. Maj. Yang, Kyung, commander of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd LOGCOMM, (Left) A Soldier of 2nd Logistics Support Command, 3rd Army of the Republic of Korea, focuses on connecting with the ball during a game of jokgu with Soldiers from Division Special Troops Battalion, 2ID, on USAG-Red Cloud April 18. The game of jokgu is a Korean sport that crosses soccer and tennis. — U.S. Army Photo By Spc. Leith Edgar sees the agreement as the basis of an everimproving relationship. “Since last year we have had a number of exchanges, and our ties have become stronger. I hope that this relationship will the 2nd LOGCOMM provides logistical support to the 3rd Army of the Republic of Korea. Capt. Lee, Hyun Woo, a ROK staff officer of USAG-RC, said the event was a chance for the Soldiers to come together and remember the importance of their solidarity. “All of our units under 2ID have a strong relationship with 2ID Soldiers,” Lee said. The sisterhood ceremony included a reading of the agreement, leaders’ remarks and a cake-cutting. Then, the leadership of DSTB squared off against the leaders of the 2nd LOGCOMM in friendly sporting matches, including soccer, softball, bowling and jokgu.After the participants worked up a sweat from the physical activity, they cooled off by taking a dip in a dunk tank. Subordinates paid for an opportunity to plunge their leaders into an icy bath. The event ended with a steak dinner at the Commanding General’s Mess, where Lt. Col. Les Brown touted the strength of the bilateral relationship. “This event is a small representation of the ROK and U.S. Alliance,” Brown said.

“Since last year we have had a number of exchanges, and our ties have become stronger. I hope that this relationship will stay strong.” Maj. Yang, Kyung, commander of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd LOGCOMM
stay strong,” Yang said in a speech during the opening ceremony. Both the Soldiers of DSTB and the 2nd LOGCOMM share the mission of defending the Republic of Korea. However, each unit accomplishes the mission by different means. DSTB supports 2ID and

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THE MORNING CALM

News & Notes
2ID & USAG-RC Present Holocaust Remembrance Do not stand silent, remember kristallnacht 1938. Speakers are Jacob Rosenberg, Elle Wiesel and Gerda Klein Holocaust survivors. today from 11 a.m. to noon in USAGRC CG’s Mess. For more information call: 732-6856. Volunteer to support 2009 Presidential Inauguration Army is looking for 200 Volunteer Reserve Component Soldiers (USAR, TPU, IMA, IRR, ARNG, or Retiree Recall) that want to volunteer to support the 2009 Presidential Inauguration in Washington, DC. Sourcing this event at 100% is a top priority. For more information contact creighton. [email protected] ACAP Counselor Position Vacancy ACAP counselors provide direct ACAP services to transitioning military personnel, Army civilians, and their family members. Position requires a Master’s Degree or equivalent and two years experience. For more information call: 730-4033. Korean Green Choir The Korean Green Choir has a Mass starting at 3.pm, May 24 at the USAG-RC Chapel, followed by a choir perfromance from 4 to 4:30 p.m. All are invited to attend. EEO/POSH Training EEO/POSH training is scheduled for supervisors 9-11 a.m., non supervisory 1-3 p.m. May 5 at USAG-RC DFMWR Conference Room. Call 732-6277 for more information. Spouses Orientation Program Schedule The Spouses Orientation Program dates are May 13 at USAG-Casey and May 20 at USAG-RC. This is a mandatory brief. For more information call: 732-5883. Women’s Professional Development Symposium The Annual Women’s Professional Development Symposium takes place May 27, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the USAG-Casey Digital Conference Center. Call 732-6273 for more information. USAG-RC Commissary Camp Stanley hosts a block party and yard sale, tomorrow, 11 a.m. - 6 p.m., at the commissary parking lot Call 732-5485 for more information. HQ IMCOM Centralized Mentoring Program Be a mentor, help develop well-rounded managers at the mid or senior level by grooming high potential emloyees to assume higher levels of responsibilities. Mentees from GS-11—13. For more information call: 732-9063. Harvard Strategist Program Harvard Strategist Program is a one year degree producting program open to all Army active competitive category captains. For more information call: 732-7015. Are You Smarter Than A Fifth Grader? If you think you are smarter than a fifth grader then here’s your chance! Event takes place May 5 at USAG-RC Mitchell’s Club, 6-9 p.m. Free admission. Dinner buffet tickets available at nearest CAC. Call 730-4601 for more information.

School children from the Dongducheon area perform a song following the environmental poster award ceremony as part of USAG-Casey’s Earth Day program, held outside Gateway Club, April 25. — U.S. Army Photo By Spc. Alun Thomas

USAG Casey celebrates Earth Day
by Spc. Alun Thomas USAG-RC Public Affairs USAG-CASEY— School children from the Dongducheon area participated in Army Earth Day activities at USAG-Casey April 25, having taken part in an environmental health poster competition, which was judged outside the Gateway Club. The event was sponsored by the Directorate of Public Works, who also set up an environmental trivia stand where people were able to win an Earth Day coffee mug by answering a trivia question correctly. A Petroleum, Oil, and Lubricant Spill Response exercise was due to be conducted outside the Gateway Club, but was cancelled due to rain. Ken Lee, USAG-RC, chief, Environmental Staff Division, said the two local schools were invited so they could learn the importance of protecting the environment. “This event is sponsored by the Casey DPW and we were hoping to have a demonstration of an oil spill as one of the events” Lee said. “The local fire department was going to show the kids how an oil spill is cleaned up.” Richard Bain, USAG-Casey DPW, said DPW is hoping to provoke environmental awareness for everybody in the nearby USAG-Casey community through the Army Earth Day event. “We have extended invitations to local schools, and one is a local elementary school, and the other is the International Christian School, which most American dependants attend,” Bain said. “They are involved with the poster contest for environmental awareness and we also have a trivia stand for Soldiers and family members.TThey have a chance to test their environmental knowledge and get a free prize.” After the school children arrived they

were welcomed by Bain and Capt. Kimberly Nelson, USAG-Casey, Headquarters and Headquarters Company commander. “I want to welcome you and thank you for participating in Earth Day,” Nelson said during her welcoming speech. Nelson thanked the children for being involved in the poster competition after which the awards for best poster were handed out. “I’m sorry everyone can’t come in first place, but I want to thank you all for participating,” Bain said during his address to the children. “I want to encourage you to stay actively involved with environmental protection; there were a lot of good thoughts and initiatives with the posters.” Following the poster award ceremony, the school children sang several songs for the audience before learning of the cancellation of the oil spill response exercise.

‘Pepper Jackson” congratulates 75th ROKA at dinner

Col. Larry ‘Pepper’ Jackson (left), USAG-RC commander, thanked Col. Cho, Yong Mun (second from left), Republic of Korea Army 75th Brigade commander and his soldiers April 23 at the USAG-Casey Warrior’s Club for strengthening the ROK-U.S. alliance. Cho and Jackson were both commissioned as armor officers in the same year, 1984. Prior to the dinner the 75th ROKA team was given a windshield tour of Casey. — U.S. Army Photo by Margaret Banish-Donaldson.

MAY 2, 2008

AREA I
command briefings and reports. “All civilians must be trained during the fiscal year,” Johnson said. “The training is spread out over the course of several months in order to be as user friendly as possible.” Annual training is conducted for three distinct groups. In addition to civilian employee training now underway, supervisors will get their own version with some of the same information, but we focus on different methods for supervisors to use for intervention, deterrence and prevention,” Johnson said. Training for the Soldiers is very different, he added. The training is usually conducted by the unit’s prevention leaders. When ADCO is invited to provide education to the unit, it is usually geared to a specific audience, underage drinking. Annual training is more than ‘checking the block’. It is not just a way of saying “you don’t have an excuse because you attended the training. Classes are intended to raise awareness and reduce substance abuse,” he said. “We’re being proactive; putting up the guard rail before the car runs into the ditch. People will always have excuses. The guard rail had no lights,” Another reason substance abuse training is important to people living and working in Korea, is Korean law. “The laws and the culture of Korea are unique,” Johnson said. “For example, when appearing before a Korean judge, it’s important to show remorse. You cannot be remorseful if you claim you cannot remember your actions. The mind set of the culture and laws appear to go hand in hand; something we as Americans take for granted.” The main information to take away from part one of the training, Johnson said, is

USAG-RC • PAGE 7 http://imcom.korea.army.mil

Red Cloud civilians get substance abuse training
by Jack Loudermilk USAG-RC Public Affairs (This is part one of a two part story to continue in the May 9 edition of the Morning Calm Weekly—Ed.) USAG-RED CLOUD—Only time can sober up a person...not black coffee, cold showers, exercise, or any other common “cures.” Alcohol leaves the body of virtually everyone at a constant rate of about .015 percent of blood alcohol content per hour. Thus, a person with a BAC of .015 would be completely sober in an hour while a person with a BAC of 10 times that .15 would require 10 hours to become completely sober. This is true regardless of sex, age, weight, and similar factors, said Wayne Johnson, director, USAG-RC Alcohol and Drug Control Office. The above fact is one of several that a group of American and Korean civilian employees from USAG-RC learned while attending part one of a two part class about substance abuse April 22 in Camp Red Cloud’s Education Center. “This is our first time to break up the annual three-hour training into two sessions of one-and-a-half hours,” Johnson explained. “We’re trying to make it easier on the employees because of other commitments. They will wait one week before attending part two to complete their annual threehour training requirement.” ADCO provides direct supervision, management, and administration over all nonclinical personnel and programs; program management and customer service issues; guidance on alcohol and drug related regulations and policies; and conducts

Wayne Johnson, USAG-RC Alcohol and Drug Control officer, holds up news clippings about real people getting into real trouble during a drug and alcohol abuse training session April 25 at Red Cloud’s Education Center. — U.S. Army Photo By Jack Loudermilk recognizing a problem and knowing what to do about the problem. “If a civilian believes they need help for themselves or a friend, they should start by calling the Employee Assistance Program, at 730-4144. Obviously, it is better to selfrefer. For USAG-RC, we usually have five to 10 self-referrals a year. It is nothing to be ashamed of nor should you be afraid to ask for help. The challenge is getting help for someone who refuses to accept they have a problem,” Johnson said. Abraham Lincoln, the sixteenth president of the United States, stated that, “It has long been recognized that the problems with alcohol relate not to the use of a bad thing, but to the abuse of a good thing.”

USAG-RC volunteers lauded in ceremony
by Spc. Alun Thomas USAG-RC Public Affairs USAG- CASEY—Volunteers from throughout USAG-RC and USAG-Casey, including the 2nd Infantry Division, were recognized at the Annual Volunteer Awards Luncheon April 28, in the Warrior’s Club There were 10 nominees for volunteer of the year and two for volunteer unit of the year, won by Rocio Marino-Crumley and the 2-9 Infantry Battalion in their respective categories. Guest speaker at the ceremony was Sue Teeples, wife of Col. David Teeples, assistant division commander, 2ID, with the awards presented by Maj. Gen. John Morgan, 2ID commander and James Richardson, USAGCasey deputy commander. G w e n d o l y n M c C a r t h y, A r m y Community Services coordinator, said during the introduction, everyone should thank the volunteers individually because of their efforts in volunteering their time and efforts. “Today before you leave we ask you recognize these volunteers with a simple pat on the back or a shake of the hand for their work with their various organizations,” McCarthy said. Chaplain (Maj.) Carol Highsmith, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, USAG-RC, delivered the invocation, which was followed by lunch and a solo rendition of ‘Lean on Me’ by Sgt. Ronald Porter. During her speech, Teeples said she was honored to be asked to address those in attendance as the topic of volunteering is close to her heart, having won numerous awards for her own volunteer work in past years. “My husband and I have been married for 32 years and for 27 of those I have been a volunteer,” Teeples said. “I have volunteered for every Army community I have lived in and have always felt a deep sense of satisfaction in giving to others.” Teeples said those who volunteer are the lifeblood of the community and their contributions are immeasurable. “Volunteers provide so many vital services to support our community, both individually and in organizations,” Teeples said. “Whether it’s teaching English to children, assisting the elderly, or teaching a cooking class, you are making a difference.” Following Teeples’ speech, the nominees for volunteer of the year were announced, all nominees being nominated by their peers, McCarthy said. “We award to you our sincerest thanks and congratulations on your commitment to improving the quality of life of the 2nd Infantry Division and United States Army Garrison,” McCarthy said. “Your devotion to duty exemplifies the flawless condition of the U.S. Army. You are truly second to none.” The awards were presented by Morgan and Richardson, with Marino-Crumley and the 2-9 Infantry Battalion receiving special plaques for their accomplishments as volunteer and volunteer unit of the year Morgan was then presented with a check for $62,757.55 representing money saved by the help of all volunteers, who spent a total of 4,075.5 hours volunteering. “These volunteers have shown dignity and class through their time and energy to make this a place to serve and serve well,” Morgan said. “For this reason we are in your debt, because without volunteers, and their commitment, kindness and generosity, none of this is possible.”

Guest speaker Sue Teeples explains the importance of volunteer work, at the Annual Volunteer Awards Luncheon, April 28, at USAGCasey Warrior Club. — U.S. Army Photo By Spc. Alun Thomas

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