The Morning Calm Korea Weekly - Nov. 25, 2005

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The Morning Calm Weekly is a U.S. Army Command Information newspaper primarily targeted towards the U.S. Military community serving, working and living at U.S. Army Installations in the Republic of Korea.

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Volume 4, Issue 8

P UBLISHED F OR T HOSE S ERVING

IN THE

R EPUBLIC

OF

KOREA

Nov. 25, 2005

The Morning Calm Weekly is

Donghwa Temple stands frozen in time
Page 16

U.S., KATUSA MPs build lasting friendships
Page 3

nline
Visit http://ima.korea.army.mil

By Senior Airman Erin Smith
51st Fighter Wing Public Affairs

President thanks servicemembers at Osan
that he was honored to be here, and to stand with the brave men and women of 51st Fighter Wing and the 7th Air Force. “Our citizens are safer because you’re ‘ready to fight tonight,’” the president said. “You are serving the calls of liberty on distant frontiers and I bring a message from home: your commander in chief is proud of you and so are the American people.” After addressing the sacrifices and contributions of the servicemembers, Bush recognized the service of their families. “I thank you from the bottom of my heart for your sacrifice in the cause of freedom,” he said. “Our military families stand strong, and America appreciates you very much.” During the speech, he made references to the Korean War and the significance that American servicemen and women have played in keeping South

OSAN AIR BASE — U.S. President George W. Bush felt the thunder and fury of the “mustang stampede” during a visit to Osan Saturday, when he addressed about 5,800 members of Team Mustang in the Black Cat hangar here. The president, along with the First Lady Laura Bush and Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, stopped here during an eight-day trip to Asia, which included visits to Japan, South Korea, China and Mongolia. He was greeted by a sea of battle dress uniforms and introduced by Army Gen. Leon J. LaPorte, U.S. Forces Korea commander, who said, “He is here with us today because he truly cares about the U.S. Forces Korea team — our servicemembers, civilians, contractors and families. He recognizes the close partnership we have with our Korean hosts and the tremendous benefits the Republic of Korea-U.S. alliance brings to both our nations in terms of peace,

First Lady Laura Bush read to children from the DoDDs American School at Camp Hialeah and a local Korean orphanage, in the Children’s Reading Room of the Busan Simin Metropolitan Municipal Library Nov. 18.

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prosperity and our democratic way of life.” During his speech, the commander in chief said

See President, Page 4

TAS Cheerleaders repeat as Far East champs
By Steven Hoover
Area IV Public Affairs

8th Army preps for transformation on peninsula
By Capt. Stacy Ouellette
Future Operations, 8th U.S. Army

CAMP GEORGE – The Taegu American School Varsity Cheerleading Squads’ experience showed Nov. 7-11, as they captured their second consecutive first place finish in the small school category at the Department of Defense Dependent Schools Far East Cheerleading Competition at Camp Zama, Japan. After winning last year with a relatively inexperienced squad, the TAS cheerleaders, with eight of 10 team members returning, used that experience to separate themselves from the competition. “Having a team that is really close, even outside of cheerleading, really helped us have a great camp and then win the competition,” said Aimee Hildenbrand, a junior. “Togetherness really helps when we are competing. The competition this year was about on the same level as last year, but I think our experience is what separated us from the other teams. They (the competition) improved, but we got better also.” To help keep that edge over the competition, the team practices regularly for

YONGSAN GARRISON — Fourteen members of Future Operations Division within the Maneuver Directorate, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 8th United States Army, traveled for an Officer Professional Development trip to three camps in Area IV. During the trip, the group visited with the Army Field Support Battalion, North East Asia at Camp Carroll, Command Support Coordination Team 2 at Second Republic of Korea Army Headquarters, and 19th Expeditionary Sustainment Command at Camp Henry. The purpose of the trip was to visit with key organizations and to discuss the roles of each in reference to the U.S. Army’s transformation on peninsula. The units were able to explain through briefings, the future direction the U.S. Army is moving and how their organization will contribute to the overall Army effort. “Through interactive discussions The Taegu American School Varisty Cheerleading Squad works to perfect their form.
TANYA FERGUSON

See Cheerleader, Page 28

See Transformation, Page 4

Commentary Thanksgiving, Chuseok share similarities
2
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Nov. 25, 2005

The Morning Calm Weekly

By Minchan Kim appy Thanksgiving to all of the servicemembers and their families in the United States, as well as in Korea. I want to thank you all for always doing a fantastic job for your family members. Today, I would like to tell you about the history of Thanksgiving Day, Korean Thanksgiving Day called Chuseok, and also the differences between them. The first American Thanksgiving was celebrated in 1621, to commemorate the harvest reaped by the Plymouth Colony after a harsh winter. In that year Governor William Bradford proclaimed a day of Thanksgiving. The colonists celebrated it as a traditional English harvest feast, to which they invited the local Wampanoag Indians. Thanksgiving was celebrated throughout the colonies after fall harvests. However, not all colonies celebrated Thanksgiving on the same day until October 1777. George Washington was the first president to declare the holiday, in 1789. By the mid-1800s, many states observed a Thanksgiving holiday. Meanwhile, a poet and editor Sarah J. Hale had begun lobbying for a national Thanksgiving holiday. During the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln, looking for ways to unite the nation, discussed the subject with Hale. In 1863, he gave his Thanksgiving Proclamation, declaring the last Thursday in November a day of Thanksgiving. Chuseok, the Korean annual Thanksgiving holiday, is one of the biggest migration events in modern Korea, with over half of the population visiting families and ancestral graves during the three-day holiday, which usually falls sometime in September or October. (Chuseok falls on August 15 on the lunar calendar.) Big cities like Seoul witness a massive exodus by car, coach bus, train, airplane and ferry. There are long lines of cars leaving Seoul on the days preceding Chuseok, causing massive traffic jams on the freeways and major rural routes. This year a trip by car from Seoul to Busan, which usually takes about five

H

hours, was reported to take as long as 20 hours! Festive occasions, such as Chuseok, demonstrate how important family is in Korean society. Family members, usually from the paternal side, get together to prepare food, honor their ancestors and cherish relatives, both living and deceased. Chuseok is a reminder that families are connected and bonded in the same fortune, and ancestors live through the offspring as part of the people’s daily lives. Holiday festivities begin many days before the actual holiday, as women busily prepare food to be put on the ancestral plate for the Chuseok ceremony. They begin preparations for the festivities weeks in advance by going to the market to buy the newly harvested rice, apples, crisp pears, juju beans,

chestnuts, sesame seeds, pine needles and more. You might wonder why people need pine needles. Koreans, like many people from traditional cultures around the world, celebrate holidays with special food. Pine needles are an essential ingredient of the Korean rice cakes called Songpyun. These cakes are made with finely ground new rice as the basic dough, and are filled with toasted sesame seeds, chestnuts, or peas sweetened with honey or sugar. Making Songpyun is one of the most festive activities associated with Chuseok. Several generations of women work in a big circle over bowls filled with glutinous rice dough and many wonderful fillings. The Songpyun is then carefully arranged between piles of freshly washed pine needles in a huge

steamer. The pine needles prevent the sticky rice cakes from clinging to each other and most of all infuse the whole house with the wonderful smell of pine trees. Grandmothers fondly tell their granddaughters about the days when they were young, making SongPyun together. Grandmothers also say those girls who make pretty Songpyun will have pretty daughters. Making Songpyun brings together generations of women and gives them an opportunity to share their life stories. This kind of relationship was more common in traditional Korean family, when at least three generations lived in the same household. Nowadays most families are nuclear families and thus

See Thanksgiving Page 4 Thanksgiving,

Giving thanks for those who serve
Thanksgiving is a time when families all over our nation gather together to give thanks for all our blessings. Many look forward to this time of year for a feast of turkey, potatoes and pumpkin pie in grand American tradition, whereas others anticipate the parades, football games or the official start of the Christmas shopping season. Many others use Thanksgiving as an opportunity to share with those less fortunate, donating food or money and spending time with those who are needy or disadvantaged. Our traditions are as diverse as our nation, and this is the special day that we dedicate to giving thanks for our good fortune, prosperity and freedoms. Our Thanksgiving tradition has a fascinating history, dating back to 1621 when the Plymouth Pilgrims gave thanks and praise after the first harvest by hosting a three-day festival. In 1789, President George Washington proclaimed the first National Day of Thanksgiving, but it was President Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War who revived the tradition, asking Americans to give thanks with “one heart and one voice by the American people.” President Franklin Roosevelt set the date to the fourth Thursday of November in 1939, reminding all American citizens to “remember that, as much has been given us, much will be expected from us, and that true homage comes from the heart as well as from the lips, and shows itself in deeds.” We protect and serve all the people of America — the land of abundance, prosperity and hope. We must never take for granted the things that make our country great: a firm foundation of freedom, justice and equality; a belief in democracy and the rule of law; and our fundamental rights to gather, speak and worship freely. In the spirit of giving back, Americans are known around the world for their generosity, as seen in the past year with the flood of relief effort, volunteers and money that were donated due to the hurricanes that ravaged our homeland. This holiday is a fantastic opportunity to share your Thanksgiving traditions and customs with others in our military family and with your Korean neighbors. This Thanksgiving, I am grateful for all those in my U.S. Forces Korea family, as your service to our country is looked upon in the highest regard by everyone back home in the United States. We are all blessed just by having our guaranteed right of freedom, and in the fight to preserve it, we are made stronger knowing that it can never be taken away from us. God’s blessings to you and all your family this Thanksgiving. GEN Leon J. LaPorte Commander, UNC/CFC/USFK

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This Army newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The Morning Calm Weekly are not necessarily official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, Department of Defense, or Department of the Army. The editorial content of this weekly publication is the responsibility of the IMA-Korea Region, Public Affairs, APO AP 96205. Circulation: 12,500 SUBMISSIONS OR COMMENTS: Phone: DSN 738-3355 Fax: DSN 738-3356 E-mail: MorningCalmWeekly @korea.army.mil

Morning Calm
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The Morning Calm Weekly

American, KATUSA MPs build lasting friendship
Red Cross Volunteers The American Red Cross has volunteer openings at the main Red Cross and 121st General Hospital Red Cross offices and clinics. New volunteers must attend a free volunteer orientation. The next orientation is Thursday. For information, call 738-3670. 3D Month Campaign Look for 3D Month, National Drunk and Drugged Driving Prevention Campaign, information kiosks at the commissary, post exchange and other Yongsan and Area II locations. For information, call Richard Boyce at 736-3289. OHA-Utilities Survey Available Online The Overseas Housing Allowance Utilities Survey is now being conducted Korea-wide, with an end date of Nov. 30. The annual survey seeks information on utility and recurring maintenance expenses from servicemembers who reside in privately leased quarters overseas and receive OHA. To participate, logon to https:// www.perdiem.osd.mil/oha/utility. 1st Signal Brigade Ball The 1st Signal Brigade will hold its Holiday Ball Dec. 2 at the Capital Hotel third floor ballroom. Social hour begins at 5 p.m. Dinner will begin at 6 p.m. Attire is civilian formal, Army Dress Mess, Dress Blues or Dress Greens. Unit reps will have tickets available until Nov. 30. For information, contact your unit representative or Sgt. Maj. Hale at 7234985. Army Benefits Center Briefs in Yongsan Representatives from the Army Benefits Center-Civilians will visit Yongsan Dec. 5 to brief Department of the Army civilians on the Civil Service Retirement System and the Federal Employees Retirement System. The briefings will at the Balboni Theater on Yongsan Main Post. The Civil Service Retirement System briefing will start at 8 a.m., and the Federal Employees Retirement System will begin at 1 p.m. The briefings will also present an overview of the Employee Benefits Information System Web site, as well as the Interactive Voice Response System. “I strongly encourage all U.S. Department of Army civilian employees to attend the Army Benefits Center’s briefings for civilians,” said Ken Stark, human resources officer at the Area II Civilian Personnel Advisory Center. “It is a great opportunity for our U. S. civilian employees to learn more about their retirement coverage and the Army Benefits Center.” For information, contact Stark, at 7383655. Holiday Mailing Deadline To ensure holiday packages arrive on time, check http://ima.korea.army.mil for mailing deadlines.

News

http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly

Nov. 25, 2005

3

By Cpl. Sarah Scully
8th Military Police Brigade

YONGSAN GARRISON — The first things Pfc. Park Jin noticed about the new MP was his shorn head, green duffle bag and hardcore attitude. More than 22 years later, that MP still has closely shorn hair, green duffle bags and a hardcore attitude. Sgt. Maj. Patrick O’Connor, S3, 8th Military Police Brigade, served with Park as a private first class during his first tour in Korea. Two decades and five tours later, he’s back in Korea and still maintains a close friendship with two of his Korean Augmentation to the U.S. Army buddies. Arriving in the chilly mountains of Camp Page north of Seoul in 1983, O’Connor soon became friends with Park and Choi Jung-ho, another private first class in the same unit. Quickly learning how to make kimchi, O’Connor and the KATUSAs shared cultural knowledge about their countries. They spent all their time together — working as MPs on the often intoxicated front lines of Chun Chon, an area similar to Itaewon, and hanging out as friends after work. That friendship took another step

(Second from left) Pfc. Patrick O’Connor, now a 8th MP Brigade sergeant major, poses with fellow friends and MPs in front of a hijacked Chinese airplane that landed at Camp Page airfield north of Seoul May 5, 1983. They were the first responders to a dangerous international incident. More than 22 years later, O’Connor remains friends with KATUSAs he served with during his first tour in Korea. May 5, 1983, when the MPs faced an experience in successful businesses. even more difficult challenge — Park worked as a Korean television serving as the first responders to a producer and now helps run a private hijacked Chinese airplane that had business. Choi is a general manager landed at Camp Page’s airfield. Park of 63 City Corporation. spoke Chinese and helped translate The only MP still in the military is between the hijackers and local O’Connor, but when they sit down officials. together, all the years apart disappear It’s one of the memories they still as they remember youthful antics. talk about decades later when they To them, the experiences they meet up again. Only now, all three See MPs, Page 4 MPs, Soldiers have families and years of

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preventing, Vaccination key to pr eventing, fighting flu
By Lt. Col. Marie H. Price
18th MEDCOM Force Health Protection Office

YONGSAN GARRISON — It is that time of the year again when infection from influenza, more commonly known as the flu, is a common health problem. Luckily, the 18th Medical Command now has vaccine available. Currently enough vaccine is on hand to immunize U.S. Forces Korea active-duty servicemembers, Emergency Essential Civilians, mission-essential civilians, Korean Augmentation to the U.S. Army Soldiers and medically high risk people (all children aged 6–23 months; adults aged <65 years; persons aged 2–64 years with underlying chronic medical conditions; all women pregnant during the flu season; children aged 6 months to 18 years on chronic aspirin therapy; out-of-home caregivers and household contacts of children aged <6 months). Priority of vaccinations are: ! Vaccines are currently being given to all active-duty servicemembers and those previously mentioned. ! As more flu vaccine becomes available, priority of immunization will be: a. TRICARE Prime beneficiaries (Monday thru Dec. 9) b. TRICARE Standard beneficiaries (Dec. 9–16) c. As more flu vaccine becomes available, 18th MEDCOM anticipates offering vaccinations to all other beneficiaries on a first-come, first-served basis, by Dec. 16. Individuals are encouraged to call their local Military Treatment Facility to verify the hours for immunizations prior to going to get flu shots. This year, the flu shot is being given with anthrax and small pox vaccinations for those who are mandated or who qualify to volunteer for these additional shots. Receiving all

three shots at the same time is safe and very effective at protecting the force against all three threats. The local MTF and units will coordinate for active-duty servicemembers’ and other essential personnel’s immunizations. All high risk beneficiaries should contact their MTF or discuss this vaccine with their health care provider. Influenza is an infection of the respiratory tract caused by the flu virus. People at highest risk of severe illness or death from the flu include people 65 years and older and small children less than 2 years old. Although it is a very common illness the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention indicates that about 200,000 people are hospitalized and about 36,000 people die in the United States annually because of the flu. More than 24,000 U.S. servicemembers were affected with flu/ in 2002 with 1,501 of them requiring hospitalization. Compared with most other viral respiratory infections, such as the common cold, flu infections often cause the more severe complications. Generally, people who get the flu recover in about one to two weeks. Common flu symptoms include fever, sore throat, stuffy or runny nose, cough, headaches, fatigue and muscle aches. The elderly and people with chronic health problems are more likely to get the flu and may develop serious, life-threatening medical complications such as pneumonia. The virus is spread indirectly through coughing or sneezing, and directly when shaking hands or sharing items such as a drinking glass. The best ways to prevent or reduce flu or cold risk include frequent hand washing, covering the nose and mouth when coughing and sneezing, and disposing of used tissues.

See Flu Page 13 Flu,

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Nov. 25, 2005

The Morning Calm Weekly
from Page 1
American life was lost in vain,” he said “The Republic of Korea is now a beacon of liberty that shines across the most heavily armed border in the world,” said Bush. “ Together, the United States and the Republic of Korea have shown that the future belongs to freedom.”

Bush
Korea a free nation. “For half a century, American servicemen and women have stood faithful and vigilant watch here in Korea. You’ve kept the peace and you secured the freedom won at great cost in the Korean War. You’ve ensured that no

Transformation
with the three staffs and a physical tour of the facilities, the members of FUOPS now have a better understanding of the internal workings of the APS-4 Battalion, 19th TSC and CSCT#2,” said Col. Richard Parker, chief of Future Operations and Force Management, Maneuver Directorate, HHC, 8th U.S. Army. “Additionally, all participants gained some insights into issues associated with 8th U.S. Army’s transformation plan.” “The OPD allowed me to establish communications with the Planners at 19th TSC and SROKA. It further allowed me to become familiar with actions and issues for logistics in their area of operation,” said Maj. Carmelia Scott-Skillern, logistical planner of Future Operations and Force Management, Maneuver Directorate, HHC, 8th U.S. Army. The trip began with a morning session the Army Field Support Battalion, North East Asia. This unit receives, maintains accountability, performs care of supplies in storage, conducts cyclic maintenance and configures combat equipment to unit sets.

from Page 1
“It’s a collaborative effort between our Army Field Support Brigade–Far East Team, Theater Leadership and our warfighter customers to make the systems work and accomplish our interlocking missions,” said Lt. Col. Jobie Roach, commander of the U.S. Army Field Support Battalion, Northeast Asia. “We owe our Soldiers the best quality materiel, when and where they need it, produced and delivered efficiently.” The Future Operations Div. and takes plans developed by the Future Plans directorate and conducts working groups with key units to develop fragmentary orders. Once it is complete, Current Operations executes the mission by publishing the order and monitoring the situation. It’s another example of different sections working together to accomplish a mission. During the visit, Parker explained the future of 8th U.S. Army to CSCT#2. “Each opportunity to dig beneath the surface of transformation issues saves the headquarters an immeasurable amount of time by addressing anticipated problems now,” Parker added.

AD GOES HERE

Thanksgiving
Chuseok provides an opportunity for different generations to interact and to appreciate their extended family. However, fewer and fewer people know how to make Songpyun or other traditional foods. Instead, they buy prepared or packaged foods in supermarkets and department stores. Chuseok morning, families carefully prepare the ancestral table for a memorial ceremony. The house of the eldest son is usually the site of the gathering. Family members arrive early in the morning to participate in the ceremony. The eldest male descendant from the line of eldest sons (even if he is not the eldest male in the family) usually presides over the ceremony. There are many rounds of bowing to the floor from a kneeling position, and ancestors are offered wine and food. After the ceremony all the food is taken out of the room and rearranged for the

from Page 2
family to eat. The family sits around the table to relish the wonderful food prepared by the female relatives over the past few days and reminisce about the ancestors. After the meal some of the food that has been set aside is taken to the graves of the ancestors. Chuseok and Thanksgiving have many similarities as well as differences. We all get together with our family, have a long break and both are celebrated in fall. But the biggest difference between them is that Koreans thank their ancestors for looking over them for the year and providing a bountiful harvest. On the other hand, Thanksgiving is a holiday that people thank God for the food and the lives they live. Despite the differences, Thanksgiving and Chuseok share a foundation of thanks and hope: Thanks for what has been given and hope for a prosperous future. Have a spectacular Thanksgiving!

MPs
shared are invaluable. When they were young, the KATUSAs and American found a way to not only work together successfully, but to nurture a friendship that overcame cultural differences and years apart. So what do they have to say to the current KATUSAs and American Soldiers?

from Page 3
“If you are not ready to understand each other, there are going to be serious problems,” said Park. “KATUSAs nowadays don’t get together with the GI Soldiers as much as they used to. “If they don’t bond by spending time and creating experiences, they won’t have as much of a long-term relationship as we’ve had,” said Park.

Nov. 25, 2005

Page 5

Order of Tomahawk tests Soldiers’ common skills
By Pfc. Yoo Je Hoon
Second Infantry Division Public Affairs

C AMP RED CLOUD – Special

SPC. TIMOTHY DINNEEN

Spc. Toby Crandall recovers after leaving the gas chamber.

Troops Battalion Soldiers participated in a four-day Order of the Tomahawk competition. The competition was held from Nov. 8 to 9 and 16 to 17. The event examined Soldiers on Common Task Training, including APFT, M-16 firing, .50-caliber M2 Machine Gun assembling, M18A1 Claymore mine installation, humvee PMCS, NBC attack prevention and NBC protection. Nov. 16 was the day for NBC attack prevention and NBC decontamination section. In the NBC attack prevention test, Soldiers had to put on their Mission Oriented Protective Posture gear in a limited time. They had to hold their Kevlar helmet between their legs, put on the protective mask and shout “gas, gas, gas.” When a Soldier failed to put on their gears on time, he or she got a “no go.” However, if the rest of the team members had a “go” the whole team, including the Soldier who failed, received “go.” For the NBC decontamination test, Soldiers had to use NBC protection kits to wash off contaminated parts of their hand and face. Unlike other NBC protection training, Soldiers had to use

ash, the main ingredient of NBC protection kit, to clean off the contamination. After decon-tamination, they cleaned their training rifle and protective mask. Team leaders carefully explained decontamination procedure to their team members and helped them out to make sure they were doing it right. “Soldiers were able to help each other while doing their mission, which looked really nice,” said Staff Sgt. Ronald Apholz, B Company, STB, who participated as a test inspector. “By practicing and studying hard after working hours in weekdays, our team members could achieve better result,” said Spc. Edward Criswell, 2ID Band. “I think team members put a lot of effort on building the solidarity of the team for this competition.” 2ID Band Soldiers all passed the NBC attack prevention and NBC decontamination section. “I was very happy to participate in this event and it was also very interesting to conduct military-related operation as if we are in an actual action,” said Spc. Ashley Sangret, 2ID Band. “I think this kind of competition is good for [Korean Augmentation to the U.S.] Soldiers since we can learn many

See Tomahawk Page 7 omahawk,

Quarterly BOSS conference spotlights leadership principles
by Margaret Banish-Donaldson
Area I Public Affairs

CAMP CASEY — With a promise of taking care of the people they lead, Korea Region Office and 2nd Infantry Division officials kicked off a quarterly Better Opportunities for Single and unaccompanied Soldier conference Nov. 16 at Camp Casey’s Second to None Club. The theme of this conference was “Leadership principles for junior enlisted Soldiers and Col. Michael Feil, 1st Brigade commander, 2nd Infantry Division, discussed how Soldiers need to trust others to be good leaders. “Soldiers need to take an active role,” he said. “Know the right thing to do and do the right thing, even when no one is looking, is what trust is all about. A leader truly concerned for others creates a supporting environment in which people are able to do their best and holds them accountable for actually accomplishing it.” While leadership is not a new concept, BOSS continuously strives to develop and nurture Soldiers to lead, so they will be best prepared to meet the demands of the future. Soldiers and civilians from all four areas participated in the event. BOSS council members listened to briefings on leadership

principles for junior enlisted Soldiers and processes for tracking and allocating KORO funds. Since BOSS was established in 1991, the organization has supported quality of life initiatives for single and unaccompanied Soldiers. Members of the four Area BOSS groups encourage, identify and plan leisure and recreational activities, community service volunteer events, and well-being issues. “BOSS performed well in all aspects of duty during the current wartime conditions, and for the Korea region, where so many of the Soldiers are either single or unaccompanied, their performance was outstanding,” said KORO top Nco, Command Sgt. Maj. Harold Gill. Gill then presented certificates of achievement and coins to the four Area BOSS Soldiers of the Quarter: Area I, Spc. Carl Smothers; Area II, Pfc. William Kilpatrick; Area III, Spc. Michelle Bruner; and Area IV, Pfc. Francesca Campbell. “This award is based on leadership and effort as a BOSS representative, committed to supporting the three pillars of BOSS,” Gill said. In addition, he presented an award to Sgt. Carl Redmond on his departure from Area I as BOSS president, for one year for

Better Opportunities for Single and unaccompanied Soldiers help renovate Area I bus station at Camp Red Cloud. exemplary selfless service. A question-and -answer session was then held to answer questions related to standards, policies, punishments and their processes. “I am very pleased with the turnout,” Gill said. “We have great command support. We hope more junior leaders understand the goals of the BOSS program.”

MARGARET BANISH-DONALDSON

http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly 6 http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly

Nov. 25, 2005

Area I
Great American Smokeout
By Pfc. Amanda Merfeld
Second Infantry Division Public Affairs

The Morning Calm Weekly

Accident Avoidance Training The Area I driver’s testing facilities will continue to train U.S. Soldiers and civilians, but cannot issue drivers licenses without an accident avoidance training certificate. Certificates are available through Army Knowledge Online. For information, call 732-7983. Bataan Memorial Death March The Bataan Memorial Death March is a 26.2-mile march through the high desert terrain of White Sands Missile Range, N.M. This memorial march is conducted in honor of the heroic servicemembers who defended the Philippine Islands during World War II, sacrificing their freedom, health and, in many cases, their very lives. Registration will be available online starting Dec. 1 at http:// www.wsmr.army.mil. Commissary Closure The Camp Red Cloud, Stanley and Casey commissaries will be closed Thursday and Nov. 25 for the Thanksgiving holiday. The facilities will be open Monday. Thanksgiving Day Meals The Area I dining facilities will have specials prices for Thanksgiving meals: Rates for E-4 and below: breakfast, $1.55; lunch, $3; and dinner, $4.90. All others: breakfast, $1.90; lunch, $3.50; and dinner, $5.80 – all you can eat. World Series of Poker Championship Camp Red Cloud’s Mitchell’s Club will host a World Series of Poker Championship tournament Nov. 25-27. The tournament will be played in the “No Limit – Texas Hold-Em” style of poker. Tournament is open to the first 320 players to sign up. For information or to register, visit www.crcmwr.com or e-mail [email protected] AFAP Conference The Army Family Action Planning Conference will be held Dec. 1-2 on Camp Casey. For information, call 730-3240. Annual Holiday Project Army Community Service is conducting an annual holiday project now through Dec. 15. The project provides commissary vouchers during the Christmas holiday for E-5 and below Soldiers with family members residing with them in Area I. Contact unit commanders or first sergeants to make a donation, or call 732-7277 for information. Christmas Angel Tree Program Army Community Service is sponsoring a Christmas angel tree program for E-5s and below, to assist in buying gifts for children, 10 years or younger, living in Area I with them. Stop by or call any Area I ACS Center: CRC 732-7779, Stanley 732-5883 or Casey 730-3107.

Soldiers learn about dangers of smoking

CAMP CASEY – Everyone should know that smoking is bad for you, after all, it is written on the pack. But just how dangerous is it, and who does it affect? Nov. 17, Capt. Jennie Polk, the command health nurse for Area 1, and Kennith Cobb, the health promotion coordinator, manned a smoking cessation information booth at Camp Casey’s post exchange in an effort to heighten health awareness concerning smoking. Polk administered a carbon monoxide test on willing participants. The test measured the level of carbon monoxide parts per million in the participants breath. Some Soldiers were more PFC. AMANDA MERFELD eager to find their own carbon monoxide levels Pfc. Josiah Robinson is administers a carbon monoxide test by Capt. Jennie than others, and the results were black and white. Polk as part of Great American Smokeout activities. For nonsmokers, the results would show “He’s now registering like he never smoked,” Polk anywhere from .00 ppm to .96 ppm. Light smokers said. produced a reading of 1.12 ppm to 1.6 ppm. Average No matter how much or how long you’ve smoked, smokers blew a 1.76 to 3.2, and smokers classified as when you quit smoking, your risk of heart disease starts “heavy smokers” would tip the scale at 3.2 and above. to drop. One year after quitting the risk of death from One curious Soldier who had been smoking for the past three years participated in the testing and blew 5.62 heart attack is cut in half. People who smoke a pack of cigarettes a day have ppm. Testing a theory, the Soldier went outside to smoke more than twice the risk of heart attack than people who a cigarette and came back inside to take the test again, have never smoked. Smokers who have a heart attack this time her test showed 8.16 ppm. have less chance of surviving than nonsmokers do. And Spc. Mathew Cooley quit smoking one month prior to taking the carbon monoxide test and blew a .32. See Smoking Page 7 Smoking,

CRC fire station undergoes renovations
Projects expand fire stations, increase firefighters’ capabilities
By Margaret Banish-Donaldson
Area I Public Affairs

CAMP RED CLOUD — The concept for a renovated fire station at Camp Red Cloud began more than two years ago. After the closing of camps Falling Water and Sears, modifications and expansion of the CRC fire department were made to accommodate fire crews, to better serve the community. The present project was approved in September 2005. “The current fire department building is a 1956 temporary frame and galvanized metal structure,” said Jerry Valentine, chief construction inspector. “The last time any work was done on this building was in 1983. This new facility will improve the quality of life and work conditions for the firemen.” Two phases of the contract were funded, explained construction inspector Pyon Hong-il. Both phases were awarded at the same time for a total cost of $450,000, with an estimated completion date of April 2006. “Korean contractors often work seven days a week and more than eight hours a day, so I expect our completion date

Korean contractors work on the renovated CRC fire station after approval and funding was received from Korea Region Office and Area I garrison officials.

MARGARET BANISH-DONALDSON

to be sooner than April,” said John Cook, fire chief. “During this construction we cannot drop our service. In order that our customers do not notice any difference in service, I have my response crew working out of Building 702 now at CRC and the communications crew is set up at Camp Stanley.” Cook added that Sparky, the fire department mascot, was temporarily moved to the fire station outside of Camp Sears. Firefighters used the self-help store to construct a fenced in area outside Camp Sears just for Sparky. In the current contract, two extensions were added: 20 feet-by-20 feet and 20 feet-by-43 feet, that increased the crew quarters square footage. Phase I, the extension portion of the project, is being done by Contracting Command Korea, and Phase II, raising of the roof, is being done by the Corps of Engineers Far East District. “The new trucks could not fit inside the current fire station, so the building height was increased to accommodate them,” Cook said. “The new model fire trucks are larger and safe. They include a fully enclosed crew cab and all the firefighters now have places for their breathing and safety equipment.” Cook said one of the basic fire rules is called “two-in and two-out.” Basically, when firefighters go inside a building to perform firefighting and rescue, a two-person intervention team stands by just outside to rescue any firemen who may get injured or trapped. The new project allows CRC to house enough people and equipment to follow this rule. Also, the older trucks could only carry four firefighters, while the new ones hold five. Plus, the previous trucks held 1,000 gallons of water and 60 gallons of foam. The new trucks carry 1,000 gallons of water and 100-200 gallons of foam. The other change was a room extension to create additional sleeping quarters. One side can be used as a classroom and a dayroom. Previously, the sleeping quarters was used for both. In addition, a dedicated communications facility will give the fire department greater communications capability and room for future improvements. E-mail [email protected]

The Morning Calm Weekly

Area I kicks off American Education Week
By Margaret Banish-Doanldson
Area I Public Affairs

Area I

http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly

Nov. 25, 2005

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CAMP STANLEY — Soldiers from the 2nd Infantry Division and Area I Support Activity filled a room at Reggie’s Nov. 15 to attend a symposium and to kick off American Education Week. Area I education officials held the event to bring together a panel of education experts and community leaders to discuss building a stronger Army with educated Soldiers. The 501st Corps Support Group Commander, Col. Jayne Carson, welcomed everyone to the symposium. She stressed the importance to educate, to train and to inspire Soldiers to become leaders of character, and of gaining professional growth throughout an Army career. “Little can be learned by Soldiers without being motivated and intellectually challenged by an active, rigorous curriculum, seasoned with practical military applications and brought to life in the classroom or laboratory by a well-credentialed service academy faculty,” Carson said. “Smart Soldiers make better leaders.” Next, the Area I Commander, Col. Forrest Newton, opened the meeting by talking about how the Army is fighting today, while at the same time preparing for tomorrow. “With educational programs offered now for nearly every specialty, changing duty stations becomes more of a disruption — although a big one — than a show-stopper,” Newton said. “As for time, there’s just never going to be enough. Reality is sinking in.” Besides, furthering your education just makes good sense, he said. For enlisted personnel, it makes a

Dina DiPalo, University of Phoenix, looks over material set out from the various institutions for the Education Symposium Nov. 15 at Camp Stanley. difference for promotion boards and recognition. With an increasing number of Soldiers getting an associate’s, bachelors and even master’s degrees, those who aren’t thinking about school might get left behind. And without at least an associate’s degree, chances of becoming a senior noncommissioned officer decrease. And after retirement, an advanced degree can help in the search for a good-paying job. “To enable this to happen, we as leaders need to get our Soldiers to participate early in educational programs, because the only difference between a private and a colonel is education,” Newton said. Joe Cothron, Korea Region Office education director, then gave an update on eArmyU and explained the programs expansion as of Oct. 1. In addition, he announced eCourse is now open to all Soldiers to include officers. Area I Education Director, James Campbell, then talked to the troops about the upcoming changes in centralized tuition assistance management to get tuition assistance for college courses. “In April 2006 all funds, grades, invoices and schedules will be centralized at Department of the Army rather than by the installation,” he said. “It’s a continual process to make the site a one-stop shop for a Soldier’s educational needs. We’re very excited to be able to now make tuition assistance available online.” He said tuition assistance is a qualityof-life program that provides tuition assistance and fees for college courses taken by active-duty Soldiers during offduty hours, and is one of the most frequent reasons Soldiers give for enlisting and re-enlisting in the Army, according to the eArmyU Web site. “Soldiers can now access the

MARGARET BANISH-DONALDSON

information anywhere, at any time, whether they are at home or deployed somewhere,” he said. “With the online signature, all the paperwork can be routed through the appropriate channels faster and more proficiently.” Campbell said the new online capability also frees up education center workers, who spent a lot of time doing the paperwork involved with tuition assistance. Now they can devote more time to face-to-face counseling and assisting customers, he said. Next, the keynote speaker, 2ID assistant division commander for support, Col. William Forrester, talked about what education, training and experience Soldiers will need for the future. “The Army is aggressively restructuring through transformation with its top three priorities: first, by fighting the global war on terrorism; second, by fielding new equipment and technology; and third, by improving and refining their business practices. These initiatives will strengthen all elements of the Army’s education system.” He also discussed how the Army maintains retention and recruiting by using incentives for high-quality Soldiers. “This action requires Soldiers with strong backgrounds in education. It also requires us as leaders to be flexible in changing the way we do things,” he said. “We have tremendous talent within our ranks, and we owe these Soldiers the opportunity to develop their abilities and recognize their potential,” Forrester said. “To help us be ready to fight tonight, the challenge is to educate our greatest asset: the American Soldier.” E-mail [email protected]

Tomahawk
military English terms,” said Cpl. Seo Jin Hee, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2ID. “This event helped us understand how well STB Soldiers are aware of Common Task Training,” Apholz said. “STB is planning on holding this event twice a year, which will help us measure how Soldiers’ skills are improving.” The grading standard was different on each subject, explained Apholz. “In some subjects, even if a member of a team fails, as long as the rest of the team members pass, the team will get ‘go.’ But, in certain subjects, if one member fails then the whole team will get a ‘no go,’” he said. “There weren’t many difficulties conducting Common Task Training-related missions,” Sangret said. “It’s the grading standard of inspectors and not knowing what the test will be like that makes this competition difficult.” Examination on M2 .50-caliber M2 Machine G u n a s s e m b l y a n d d i s a s s e m b l y, M 1 8 A 1 Claymore mine installation and First Aid were held Nov. 8. In the first aid section, the test NCOIC told the participants the condition of the patient and Soldiers had to take the correct first aid action. The teams had to show perfect and organized safety checks and installation for the M18A1

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Smoking

from Page 6

PFC. YOO JE HOON

Spc. Matthew Jackson, 2ID Band, uses his decontamination kit to clean his face and hands during the NBC portion of the Order of the Tomahawk Nov. 16. Claymore mine installation portion. “We studied and practiced on weekdays after our working hours,” Seo said. “Considering the short time we had to prepare, we are satisfied with our result. “We weren’t familiar with assembling and disassembling the M2 Machine Gun and I think that was the hardest part,” he said. “This kind of competition helps us to be better Soldiers and it should be held more often,” said Pfc. Yoon Yoo Ra, 2ID civil military operations.

people who keep smoking after a heart attack increase the chances they’ll have a second attack. Nicotine isn’t the only bad element in cigarette smoke. Carbon monoxide gets in the blood and reduces the oxygen available to the heart and all other parts of the body. Tobacco smoke makes blood clot faster and makes clots more likely to form. These effects harm a person’s cardiovascular system. Second-hand smoke promotes illness too. In 1996, about 15 million children up to age 18 (more than 20 percent of all U.S. children) were exposed to environmental tobacco smoke in the home. Children of smokers have many more respiratory infections than do children of nonsmokers. Nonsmoking women exposed to tobacco smoke are also more likely to have low birth weight babies. Smoking reduces the amount of oxygen to the heart muscle. At the same time it makes the heart beat faster, which increases its demand for oxygen. Thus, when smokers with angina exert themselves, they get chest pain sooner than they normally would. Often this means they must restrict their activity more than they normally would. To learn more about smoking cessation or any other health-related questions, call Cobb at 730-3542 or contact the local medical clinic. (Editor’s Note: Information for this story was provided by the American Heart Association and the American Stroke Association.)

E-mail [email protected]

Nov. 25, 2005

Page 9

Local firefighters practice heavy metal skills
By Steve Davis
Area II Public Affairs

An Area II firefighter opens a vehicle with the “ Jaws of Life” during a Nov. 17 joint training exercise at Camp Coiner.

Roof removed, firefighters turn their attention to the “victim.”

CAMP COINER — As firefighters ripped off a vehicle door with the steely “Jaws of Life” hydraulic spreader, Area II Fire Department Training Officer Andrew Cheyne orchestrated their next move. A “victim” protected by a silver fireproof cover, sat motionlessly behind the black steering wheel with a medic behind him stabilizing his injuries and keeping him calm, as teams of Yongsan Garrison and the Yongsan-gu firefighters worked methodically to free him. As Area II firefighters worked on one side of the vehicle, their counterparts from Yongsan-gu worked on the other. They had been briefed on equipment and procedures and were now in the second “hands-on” phase of joint vehicle extrication training conducted Nov. 16-17 at Camp Coiner. “Depending on the condition of the victim and the vehicle, we may have to take doors or the roof off or roll up the dash to free the patient,” said Cheyne. The firefighters first stabilized the vehicle by blocking its wheels,

checked for fuel leaks and disconnected the battery to prevent a fire. They covered the accident victim and began peeling the roof off. Cheyne said their method depends on how critical the injuries are and how the victim is trapped. “Right now we are just simulating,” said Cheyne. “We have to take the doors and roof off. We want to keep the victim in one place and remove the vehicle around him.”

If the door is locked, firefighters create a “purchase point” big enough to get “Jaws of Life” spreaders in to open the door, or use a cutter to remove a hinge. They can also use a cutter to take roof posts off in a clockwise direction. Area II Assistant Fire Chief Choe Han-chol said there has never been a need to do an actual vehicle extrication, but Area II firefighters train quarterly to stay proficient.

See Firefighters, Page 12

A “victim” receives medical treatment during joint vehicle extrication training Nov. 17 at Camp Coiner.

PHOTOS

BY

STEVE DAVIS

Community pays homage to Native Americans
Heritage month highlights cultural contributions
By Sgt. Christopher Selmek
Area II Public Affairs

121st General Hospital offers flu vaccinations
18th Medical Command Public Affairs YONGSAN GARRISON — The 121st General Hospital is providing ‘flu shots’ throughout the influenza season. People enrolled in the TRICARE Prime plan can receive vaccinations starting Monday through Dec. 9. The next round of vaccinations will be available Dec. 9-16 to TRICARE Standard participants. Officials said if vaccine is available after Dec. 16 all eligible beneficiaries may seek the shot. Active-duty servicemembers must coordinate through unit representatives. People at high risk from the influenza virus can contact the clinic at any time. People 65 and above, children 6-23 months and all others with chronic health issues are in the high-risk category. Medical officials request a medical record be brought to the clinic at the time of the vaccination to allow for review and documentation. The shots are available at the hospital at the Ambulatory Care Clinic 7:30 11:30 a.m., Monday-Wednesday and Friday, and 1-4 p.m., Monday-Friday The pediatrics clinic will provide the shot 8-10 a.m., Monday-Wednesday and Friday. For information, call 737-3085.

YONGSAN GARRISON — The Yongsan community celebrated Native American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month Nov. 16 in the Dragon Hill Lodge with the theme “honoring heritage and strengthening our nation’s spirit.”

PHOTOS

BY

SGT. CHRISTOPHER SELMEK

Maj. Amy Brison (left) and Sgt. Matilda Adakai listen to a speech at a Nov. 16 Native American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month event.

About 100 Soldiers, civilians and family members gathered to learn about Native American culture. Sgt. Matilda Adakai, Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 25th Transportation Battalion, told the group how the Navajo people were forced to send their children to government boarding schools. “The children were stripped of their American Indian identity by forcing them to dress, act and speak only in English,” Adakai said. “They were forced to take English names.” Adakai said this was part of an assimilation process. “Many Navajo children decided they didn’t want to go,” she said. “Even to this day, my mom only speaks in Navajo. She was one of those children who refused to go to the government boarding school.” Adakai said she is thankful for her mother’s refusal to be assimilated. “I am fluent in Navajo because of that,” she said. “I’m one of over 160,000 Navajos that are fluent in our language.” Adakai explained how even after the Navajos endured cruel treatment, they were willing to help on a secret project

Maj. Tracey Clyde, 8th Military Police Brigade, gives the keynote speech for the event. to help win World War II. Navajo linguists used their language as a code during the war. “The Japanese were never able to understand the language,” Adakai said. “They credited it as one of the reasons they lost the war.” Other Native Americans shared their experiences growing up. Maj. Amy Brinson painted a colorful picture of her culture. She spoke of traditional chanting, displayed decorative outfits and beamed with pride about her family. “They are the first Americans and they still have lessons to teach us,” Brinson said. “It’s always good to know where people come from, that way we

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Nov. 25, 2005

http://ima.korea.army.mil/area2

Area II
By David McNally
Area II Public Affairs

The Morning Calm Weekly

Great American Smokeout gives reasons to quit
Radio Town Hall Phone in or e-mail questions to the Area II commander and staff during an Area II Radio Town Hall to be broadcast live on The Eagle 102.7 FM 9-10 a.m. Monday. Call 738-7040 during the broadcast to ask questions or e-mail to [email protected] before or during the town hall meeting. For information, call 738-7354. Community of Sharing Assist Area II families (E-6 and below or civilian equivalent) during Community of Sharing – Holiday Project 2005. The program provides commissary holiday food vouchers, toys and gift certificates. The application deadline is Dec. 12. For information, call Doris Lebby at 738-8977. Donors Needed Register to be a potential bone marrow donor 2-8 p.m. Thursday at the Collier Field House by donating a small blood sample. This will go into a DoD database to identify potenial donors. For information, call 737-6225. Protestant Women’s Study Protestant Women of the Chapel meets 9-11:15 a.m. every Wednesday for praise and worship, fellowship and Bible study. Childcare and homeschool room available. For information, call 795-4073. Toys for Tots Volunteers The Marine Corps Reserve Toys for Tots program is looking for a few good volunteers to help collect and distribute toys to orphanages and other charities during its annual toy drive. For information, call 723-7088. Mask Training Family members may attend a two-hour class on the use of Nuclear, Biological and Chemical protective equipment. Participants must bring their assigned M17 Protective Mask. Training equipment will be provided for babies and hard-to-fit adults. Classes are available 9-11 a.m. or 1-3 p.m. Dec. 12-13 at the 38th Chemical Detachment classroom in Building T4832 near the Yongsan Auto Craft Shop on MP Hill. For information, call 738-3658. Winter Tour of Homes Enjoy holiday decorations from around the world during the American Forces’ Spouses Club 2005 Winter Tour of Homes 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Dec. 9. Tour historic Yongsan homes, including Hilltop House and Sorabol House. Homes at BlackHawk, Burke Towers, South Post and Embassy housing are also included. Cost is $5. The tour is limited to 250. For information, e-mail [email protected] Hates Off to Reading SeoulAmerican Elementary School will hold a special reading event 5 p.m. Tuesday. Parents and children are invited to wear their silliest hat to the school gymnasium. Families can watch a fairy tale play, enjoy the school choir and listen to their favorite books read by special Yongsan community readers. Aliteracy workshop will be offered to parents.A book fair will follow the event. For information, e-mail [email protected] News & Notes Online For more Area II News & Notes, visit the Area II Support Activity Web site at http://ima.korea.army.mil/area2 and look for a link under “Area II Highlights at a Glance.”

YONGSAN GARRISON — Across America and U.S. military installations worldwide, health care professionals launched a plan Nov. 17 to help smokers quit. “We’re trying to get people to quit for at least 24 hours,” said Suh Ok-hee, 18th Medical Command health promotion supervisor. “If they know they can go a whole day without smoking, maybe they can get courage to stop smoking for the rest of their lives.” Each year, the Great American Smokeout gives people reasons to quit. “If you ask smokers, seven out of 10 want to quit,” Suh said. “Many of them have tried to quit, but they’re not successful.” Suh said people get frustrated with their inability to quit. In Area II, health promotion coordinators and volunteers gave potential quitters a “survival kit.” The alternatives included things like carrots, cucumbers and chewing gum. At Yongsan, teams manned booths at the main exchange and commissary entrances and at the 121st General Hospital, where they counseled people and handed out free literature and goodies. Lunchtime crowds milled around the displays and asked questions. “When they quit smoking, they need

Garry Warrix (center right) speaks with health promotion workers about giving up smoking cigarettes Nov. 17 during the Great American Smokeout. some help,” Suh said. “They can’t just ‘kick the habit.’” Suh said smokers deal with nicotine addiction as well as psychological behaviors that come with the habit. Garry Warrix, a Defense Commissary Agency civilian employee, has been smoking for more than 30 years. He said he quit once for two months following a smoking cessation class. Warrix signed a pledge to quit smoking for 24 hours. He said he wants to quit and may consider attending the class again. “I’ve had five people, so far, who said they were going to quit, not just for 24 hours, but they were going to quit for good,” Suh said.

DAVID MCNALLY

A simple breath test gives a stark comparison between a nonsmoker and a smoker. A carbon monoxide screening measures parts per million of poisonous gas inside lungs. In a nonsmoker, the reading should be zero. At the Yongsan Main Exchange, a heavy smoker stepped up to the machine and blew a reading of 36 parts per million of carbon monoxide. “That’s not good,” Suh said. “That’s poison in your system.” Staff Sgt. Ron Nagy stopped by the display with his pregnant wife. He said he decided to quit, coincidentally, the day before. Nagy also took the carbon monoxide

See Smokeout, Page 12

ACS hosts workshop for special needs parents
By Cpl. Seo Ki-chul
Area II Public Affairs

YONGSAN GARRISON — A workshop for parents with special needs drew more than 20 Yongsan community members to the Community Services Building Nov. 14-15 to promote better ways for taking care of their children. “Military parents move frequently,” said Alexander Carter, event coordinator. “Moving itself creates special needs. This workshop was for those families with children with special education or health needs.” Specialized Training of Military Parents, or STOMP, is an organization based in Washington that empowers military parents and individuals with disabilities by providing information and training about laws, regulations and resources. “I have a son who has a learning disability,” said Tina Brannen. “My son was recently diagnosed and I wanted to get more information to better be prepared for him.” Brannen said she didn’t know where to go. “I believe this class gave some basic information that I really need to know to better represent my child and get the services he needs,” she said.

Teachers of disabled students also attended the two-day workshop. “I found it very informative and interesting,” said Pam Lennard, Seoul American High School teacher. “It definitely gave me more confidence for taking care of disabled students in my class.”

Carter said STOMP received a federal grant from the U.S. Department of Education to come to the Pacific region, including Korea and Japan. “The workshop covers accessible educational and medical programs and the military systems such as TRICARE and the Exceptional Family Member Program.” he said. STOMP consists of parents of children who have disabilities and have experience in raising their children in military communities and traveling with their spouses to different locations. Washington State STOMP project director Heather Hebdon visited Korea to give easy access to useful resources and programs. “I think it went really well,” Hebdon said. “There were a lot of different programs we prepared, including information about the Individual Education Program and their rights and responsibilities.” Hebdon said they also addressed networking and communication skills. “We work together to do what’s good for kids,” she said. For information on future STOMP training, call 738-5311 or visit http:// stompproject.org/ online. E-mail [email protected]

The Morning Calm Weekly

Korean teachers learn about American education system
USO-organized tour reaches out as part of 8th U.S. Army Good Neighbor Program
By Pvt. Lee Yang-won
Area II Public Affairs

Area II

http://ima.korea.army.mil/area2

Nov. 25, 2005

11

YONGSAN GARRISON — Twenty-six Korean middle school teachers found out about the American education system during a Nov. 16 visit to a Yongsan Garrison school. The Seoul USO organized the tour of Seoul American Middle School as part of the 8th U.S. Army Good Neighbor Program. This is the third such visit. For the Korean teachers, the visit was a chance to learn differences between Korean and American curriculum and teaching methods. “The students seemed to be really focused on what they were learning,” said Nam Jae-ha, Bukwang Middle School English teacher. “I really like the way kids present more in front of the class and the way it makes classmates concentrate.” As students guided the Korean English teachers through 24 different classes, they observed how each classroom was decorated with student work. “Unlike Korean schools, the students move from one room to another instead of the teachers,” Nam said. “I think it’s good for teachers to stay still because they won’t leave any class materials in the teacher’s office.” She was impressed how teachers could make the best out of the classroom by relating topics discussed during class. “Every class I observed today had massive amounts of school materials, whether it was tacked onto the wall or hanging above the ceiling,” said Dongnam Middle School teacher Pae Kyeong-ju.

Seoul American Middle School student Emily Eastlake (middle) explains what the class is working on to the Korean teachers. Pae said American students learn in a way that is During some classes a student was given a warning fun, because they can easily see materials about the card by the teacher to correct bad behavior. If the subject they’re learning. student’s attitude is not fixed after three warning cards, In Korea, students spend most of their day sitting parents are called to see the teacher. and listening to a teacher. “Warning the child in a different, but firm manner “When I was told that materials exhibited in the like this can get parents’ attention easier,” said Kim classrooms [here] were activities actually done by the Su-hee, a visiting Korean teacher. students themselves, I thought it gives them She said she liked the way the teachers maintained confidence and pride that they have understood what the class atmosphere with smiles and laughter, but they’ve been learning,” Pae said. “That’s what makes became very strict when needed. “The students here them motivated to learn more.” always want to participate in an ordered fashion and Another thing that surprised the Korean teachers that’s what makes the class more vivid,” Nam said. was the ‘warning card’ system the middle school had in every classroom. E-mail [email protected]

PVT. LEE YANG-WON

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Nov. 25, 2005

http://ima.korea.army.mil/area2

Firefighters
Cheyne said, “We train this way so that if we do have an actual emergency, this is how we plan to take care of the situation.” Fifteen Yongsan-gu firefighters were invited to train alongside their Yongsan Garrison counterparts. The two-day training wasn’t all work.

Area II
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There was also socializing between the firefighters, who share a mutual response agreement. “After training, we take ‘em back to the station and feed ‘em good ol’American hamburgers and hot dogs,” said Cheyne. E-mail [email protected]

The Morning Calm Weekly

Native
can understand each other a lot better.” Maj. Tracey Clyde, 8th Military Police Brigade, gave the keynote speech for the event. He recounted his early days on an Indian reservation, where he imagined no future happier than taking sheep to market in the back of a Ford pickup. “My parents did not have a high school diploma,” he said. “The Navajos, as well as other Native Americans in my parents generation, were forcibly taken from their families and homes on the reservation and they were bused to various Indian schools where they were forced to speak only English.” Clyde said Native Americans are represented well in the U.S. military. “A big reason Native Americans join the military is the similarity of a proud warrior tradition,” he said. “In the military, we honor and value our young men and women; we also value the qualities of the warrior ethos. Likewise, a tribal member who returns from

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service is honored and recognized at tribal and family gatherings.” Also at the event, Yongsan Girl Scout Troop Studio 2B38 members recited, “Who am I?” as they played the parts of notable American Indians, and told about their contributions. Girl Scout co-leaders Michelle Johnson and Angela Scott said the girls researched the Native Americans at the library. “They learned to get together and learn about other cultures,” Johnson said. “Most of the girls chose Native American women to talk about. That’s what Girl Scouts are about … learning about women who are achievers.” “Some of our friends are Native American, and we want to learn about their history out of respect to them,” said Lonaye Johnson, a Girl Scout. “It was their land first, and it’s important we honor their heritage.” E-mail [email protected]

Yongsan Girl Scouts dress up during a presentation to honor Native Americans Nov. 16 at the Dragon Hill Lodge. The girls spoke about Native Americans who made history.

DAVID MCNALLY

Smokeout
screening. He blew 10 parts per million, even though he hadn’t smoked within 24 hours. “It takes 48 hours to clear the carbon monoxide from your lungs,” Suh said. Tammy Duffy, Area II health promotion coordinator, said there are many things in life that cannot be changed. “Smoking is something in your life you can change,” she said. “But if you don’t want to quit, there is nothing anyone can do or say to make you.

from Page 10
You have to want to quit.” In Area II, a smoking cessation class starts every month. The next session begins Dec. 5 and meets four times during the month. For information, call 736-6693. “If we can get just one person to quit smoking for the rest of his life, I would consider today a success,” Duffy said. E-mail [email protected]

Web Visit the Area II Web site

ex Web story This week read an e xclusive Web stor y about: ! Korean Soldiers bid farewell to U.S. Army

The Morning Calm Weekly

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Nov. 25, 2005

Soldiers may file claims for stolen bikes
Special to The Morning Calm Weekly
Camp Red Cloud Claims Office

13

Due to the recent rise in Area I on-post bicycle thefts, all Soldiers should be aware of the claims procedures for stolen property. The Army claims service is a gratuitous service. Claims offices do not provide total insurance and often can only make partial compensation. Therefore, the best way to protect your belongings is to purchase private homeowner’s, renter’s, or personal property insurance. The Personnel Claims Act allows compensation for bicycle thefts that occur at on-post or assigned offpost quarters if claimants made a reasonable effort to safeguard their personal property. A “reasonable effort” requires that the bicycle was properly secured at the time of theft. Bicycles must be kept indoors or chained to a fixed outdoors object (rack, pole, post or tree). A bicycle left unsecured in a hallway or patio will prevent an owner from collecting on a theft claim. Claimants also must comply with several additional factors. The bicycle must be registered on-post in accordance with local regulations. In the 2nd Infantry Division, registration requires owners to submit the following information to the Pass and ID Section: serial number; manufacturer; color; and brand. The bicycle owner must place the colored sticker they receive from the Pass and ID Section on their bike. Additionally, claimants must report the theft to the military police (or to the Korean National Police if the theft occurs off post) as soon as possible. Most thefts that are not reported promptly are considered unsubstantiated and, therefore, not payable. Finally, keep in mind that often a claimant who files a compensable theft claim will not receive the

amount of money he paid for the bicycle. The Army will pay the claimant an amount based on the depreciated value of the bike, rather than its replacement cost or the amount necessary to purchase a bicycle of similar type. Depreciated value takes into account the age of the bike and associated wear and tear. Under Army regulation, the original price paid for the bike will be depreciated by 10 percent for every year since its manufacture date. Further, the maximum amount

payable for bicycles under the Personnel Claims Act is $750. If you own a valuable bicycle, it is wise to purchase a private insurance policy that provides replacement value and not depreciated value for stolen items. The Army will provide partial compensation. However, purchasing a private insurance policy that reimburses you for the replacement value will ensure that you receive full compensation for your stolen bicycle. For information, contact the local claims office.

Flu
Another risk-reducing preventive measure is to get the annual flu shot, and the best time to get the flu shot is now. Since flu has a history of causing disease and non-battle injury rates that reach epidemic proportions, getting the flu vaccine helps to preserve and ensure readiness of the command. Many people think the flu shot can give them the flu. This is simply not true. Some people may get the flu even after getting the flu shot, but they will still be protected against the more severe complications of the flu. People who may not be able to get the flu vaccine include those with a high fever, previous severe flu vaccine reactions, or anyone allergic to eggs. Currently, many people have been hearing the stories concerning the Avian Flu Virus’ (H5N1) potential to become a pandemic flu. If a person gets both the human flu and the bird flu, a reassortment of genes can occur and create a new virus with the lethality of bird flu and the contagiousness of human flu. This has great
!

from Page 3

Priority of Vaccinations
Vaccines are currently being given to all activeduty servicemembers, people 65 years and older, medically high risk individuals, Emergency Essential/ Mission Essential Civilian personnel, and KATUSAS. ! As more flu vaccine becomes available, priority of immunization will be: ! TRICARE Prime beneficiaries (Monday thru Dec. 9) ! TRICARE Standard beneficiaries (Dec. 9–16) ! All other beneficiaries, first-come, fist-served (starting Dec. 16).

potential to cause a worldwide flu. Getting the human flu shot will not protect against the H5N1 strain of flu, but it will reduce the risk of the re-assortment of genes that could create a worldwide pandemic. Visit the local MTF for information. (Editor’s Note: Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia: www.cdc.gov Medical Surveillance Monthly Report, Vol. 9, No. 6: http:// amsa.army.mil.)

14 http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly
Nov. Nov. 25 - Dec. 1

Nov. 25, 2005

The Morning Calm Weekly

Flightplan
PG-13

Exorcism of Emily Rose
PG-13

Exorcism of Emily Rose
PG-13

Chicken Little
G

The Corpse Bride PG No Show Cry Wolf
PG-13

The Corpse Bride PG No Show Just Like Heaven PG-13 No Show
Exorcism of Emily Rose
PG-13

No Listing

Flightplan
PG-13

The Weather Man R The Weather Man R Just Like Heaven PG-13 The Corpse Bride PG Dreamer
PG

The Weather Man R The Weather Man R Cry Wolf
R

Exorcism of Emily Rose
PG-13

No Show No Listing

The Weather Man R The Weather Man R The Corpse Bride PG Dreamer
PG

Cry Wolf
PG-13

No Show Flightplan
PG-13

No Show
Exorcism of Emily Rose
PG-13

No Show No Listing No Listing

Flightplan
PG-13

Flightplan
PG-13

No Show

No Show

No Show

Get Rich or Die Tryin -- An orphaned street kid (Curtis “50 Cent” Jackson) makes his mark in the drug trade, but finally dares to leave the violence of his former life behind to pursue a promising career in the music business as a rapper.

Exorcism of Emily Rose -- In an extremely rare decision, the Catholic Church officially recognized the demonic possession of a 19 year-old college freshman. Told in flashbacks, ‘The Exorcism of Emily Rose’ chronicles the haunting trial of the priest accused of negligence resulting in the death of the young girl believed to be possessed and the laywer who takes on the task of defending him.

Chicken Little -- After Chicken Little causes widespread panic—when he mistakes a falling acorn for a piece of the sky—the young chicken is determined to restore his reputation. But just as things are starting to go his way, a real piece of the sky lands on his head. Chicken Little and his band of misfit friends, Abby Mallard, Runt of the Litter and Fish Out of Water, attempt to save the world without sending the town into a whole new panic.

The Weather Man Popular Chicago television weatherman, Dave Spritz, has a shot at the big time when a national morning television show calls him for an audition. Professionally, Dave is on the top of the world, but his personal life is in complete disarray. Dave’s painful divorce, his dad’s illness and trouble with his kids have him poised on the knife’s edge between stability and disaster. The harder he tries to control events, the more he finds life, like the weather, is completely unpredictable.

The Corpse Bride Set in a 19th century European village, this stop-motion, animated feature follows the story of Victor, a young man who is whisked away to the underworld and wed to a mysterious Corpse Bride, while his real bride, Victoria, waits bereft in the land of the living. Although life in the Land of the Dead proves to be a lot more colorful than his strict Victorian upbringing, Victor learns that there is nothing in this world, or the next, that can keep him away from his one true love.

Just Like Heaven A San Franciscan man falls in love with a female spirit he encounters in his home. The dilemma is that the woman whose ghost he’s swooning over has been in a coma for months, and, unless he does something, she’ll be taken off life support.

Four Brothers
R

Two for the Money R
Get Rich or Die Tryin R Exorcism of Emily Rose
PG-13

Undiscovered
PG-13

Get Rich or Die Tryin R

Just Like Heaven PG-13 Exorcism of Emily Rose
PG-13

Get Rich or Die Tryin R Exorcism of Emily Rose
PG-13

Two for the Money R Exorcism of Emily Rose
PG-13

No Show
Exorcism of Emily Rose
PG-13

No Show Transporter 2
PG-13

No Listing No Listing No Listing No Listing No Listing No Listing

Roll Bounce
PG-13

Roll Bounce
PG-13

No Show
Get Rich or Die Tryin R Exorcism of Emily Rose
PG-13

Exorcism of Emily Rose
PG-13

Flightplan
PG-13

Flightplan
PG-13

No Show
Exorcism of Emily Rose
PG-13

Get Rich or Die Tryin R Get Rich or Die Tryin R

Get Rich or Die Tryin R

The Corpse Bride PG-13 March of the Penguins G Rebound PG

Exorcism of Emily Rose
PG-13

March of the Penguins G Rebound PG

March of the Penguins G Just Like Heaven PG-13

Roll Bounce
PG-13

Roll Bounce
PG-13

Rebound PG

Just Like Heaven PG-13

Just Like Heaven PG-13

No Listing

The Morning Calm Weekly

http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly

Nov. 25, 2005

Season of lights is upon us
By Chaplain (Maj.) Mark Frederick
2nd Inf. Dov., Fires Brigade

15

ob Evans was blind for the first 51 years of his life. He lived in a dark world filled with sounds, but not sight. Then, delicate surgery was performed and, for the first time in his life, he could see the light. He said on one occasion, “There are times when I just sit outside to drink in the beauty of a sunset, followed by a night filled with the brilliant light of the stars, blinking in the heavens. I wonder if you realize just how wonderful the gift of sight really is. All my life I was surrounded by beauty and I never realized it until now. I didn’t even know what I was missing.” Bob Evans did not only receive his sight, he saw the light. For Bob Evans, seeing the light was a miracle. He could really sing, “Amazing Grace.” During the next few weeks, you will probably see more lights glowing or flashing around you than any other time of the year. The reason is because we are entering the season of lights. Consumer trend-tracker Pam Danziger, of Unity Marketing, projects that Americans will spend $622 million for indoor lights and $623 million for outdoor lights during the season of lights. That is a lot of money to spend on lights. Someone plainly said concerning light, “Everyone goes for the glow.” So what is the significance of lights? Lights can turn into cultural, political or theological statements at the flick of a switch. Light stands for pure beauty and power in every theology. Lights can represent hope and celebration. For religious and even non-religious people, lights inspire belief or mark the

B

remembrance of something that is important. The last time I traveled in an airplane, I constantly stared out the small window looking for lights. High above the clouds everything seemed so dark and void. But, as the airplane began to approach the airport, I remember seeing the lights below and they gave me comfort and hope to know the long-anticipated journey was about to end. Spiritually, the Bible is a source of hope and comfort for me. The Bible is my personal “lamp” or light that gives direction to my life. When life seems hopeless and dark, I can turn on the “lamp” and read that God is light and in him there is no darkness at all. So when I may feel like, “there is no light at the end of the tunnel,” God’s Word helps me to understand that even the tunnel is really not dark because God’s light is in me and with me. Yes, I have a spiritual light within me. I can see the light but that is not the question. The real question is can others see that light within me? Does my light bring hope and comfort to those that I live, work and serve with every day? God’s Word says that I am a light in this world. It also says, let your light shine before men, that they may see your good deeds and praise your Father in heaven. During this season of lights, I don’t want to be blind to the lights that are flashing and glowing around me. Like Bob Evans, I want to enter this season of lights with excitement and amazement. I am thrilled to see the light shining in other people. I want others to see my light by the way I speak, smile and share good things with people in need. Look for the light within you. Look at the lights around you. Let the brightness of the lights bring you hope and comfort. That is the miracle of lights.

Yongsan/Area II Holiday Religious Services and Programs
Catholic
Advent Community Penance Service 6-9 p.m., Dec. 5 Memorial Chapel

Protestant
Advent Fellowship & Hanging of the Green 3-6 p.m., Saturday 121 Hospital Chapel 2005 KATUSA Praise Worship 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Dec. 2 South Post Chapel K-16 Community Gathering Sunday 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Dec. 4 K-16 Chapel Children’s Christmas Program 11-11:30 a.m., Dec. 11 Hannam Village Chapel Children’s Christmas Play noon to 1:30 p.m., Dec. 11 South Post Chapel Community Choir Christmas Cantata 7-8 p.m., Dec. 11 South Post Chapel Christmas Cantata 8-9 p.m., Dec. 18 Memorial Chapel Christmas Cantata 11-11:30 a.m., Dec. 18 Hannam Village Chapel Christmas Cantata (UPCI) 1:30-3 p.m., Dec. 18 Memorial Chapel KCFA Christmas Worship (USFK KN) 6-9 p.m., Dec. 20 Memorial Chapel Children’s Christmas Program (ROCK Svc) 7-8 p.m. Dec. 23 SAHS Auditorium Christmas Eve Caroling/Fellowship
All Worship Services on Christmas Sunday will be as scheduled except Catholic. For information call 738-3011.

Ad goes here

16 http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly

Nov. 25, 2005

The Morning Calm Weekly

The main building at Donghwasa. Most of the present buildings were constructed during the Joseon Dynasty.

PHOTOS

BY

SPC. JOANNE M. PAE

Donghwa Temple - Frozen in time
By Spc. Joanne M. Pae
109th MPAD

DONGHWASA -- Nestled on the side of the picturesque Palgong mountain rests the centuries-old Donghwa temple. Located approximately 30 minutes north of Daegu, Donghwasa is a perfect afternoon destination for the entire family. Donghwasa was founded in 493 A.D. during the Silla Dynasty. Originally named Yugasa, the temple’s name was changed by Prince Simji in 832 A.D. after its reconstruction. The temple faced numerous reconstructions throughout the Goryeo and Joseon Dynasties, with most of the present buildings constructed during the rule of King Yeongjo of the Joseon Dynasty. Donghwasa is home to the tallest stone Buddha in Asia, measuring 33 meters, and the temple itself houses six national treasures and many cultural relics, including a Maae Buddha carved by Prince Simji. Parking is available at the base of the mountain, and a short hike up a paved road leads visitors to the steps of the main temple area. Visitors are able to leave the paved This statue of Buddha located at Donghwasa is, at 33 meters, the tallest stone Buddha in Asia.

A sign on the main temple shows the name of temple written in Chinese characters. road and hike or picnic along a beautiful stream running down the mountain. Although the hike is not strenuous, comfortable shoes are recommended. Visitors can tour the main temple as well as the surrounding buildings. Photographs, however, can only be taken of the buildings’ exteriors. To visit Donghwasa by car, drive towards the Daegu Airport on Highway 60, then turn onto Highway 80. Follow the directions to Mt. Palgong and Donghwasa. Plan about 45 minutes for the drive. The next time you find yourself in the Daegu area, take time to enjoy this piece of Korean history. (Editor’s Note: Historical information for this article was provided by the staff at Donghwa temple.)

A pagoda on the temple grounds

18 http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly

Nov. 25, 2005

The Morning Calm Weekly

BOSS offers Mount Sorak at bargain price
By Staff Sgt. Daniel Roman
Korea Region Office MWR

World Series of Poker The Mitchell’s “World Series of Poker” will be Nov. 25-27 at the Camp Red Cloud club. Participation is limited to the first 320 players, with prizes awarded to top finishers. For information or to sign up, call 732-9187. Comedy ROKs Returns Morale, Welfare and Recreation is bringing Comedy ROKs back to Korea. Dante Carter, Miss Gayle and Spike Davis will perform their stand-up comedy act on installations throughout Korea Dec. 3-16. With appearances on H.B.O.’s Def Comedy Jam, B.E.T’s “Comic View,” “Planet Grove,” A&E’s “Evening at the Improv,” Showtime’s “Laffapalooza” and “The Gordon Elliot Show,” the trio boast fans across America and around the world. Comedy ROKs is presented courtesy of MWR. All performances are free and open to military ID cardholders. For information, contact your local MWR Entertainment Office or call 723-3749. Scheduled performances in Korea include: 8 p.m. Dec. 3, Camp Carroll, Hideaway Club 8 p.m. Dec. 4, Camp Hialeah, Pusan Pub 8 p.m. Dec. 6, Camp Walker, Hilltop Club Dec. 8, Area III, TBD 8:30 p.m. Dec. 9, K-16 AB, Community Club 8:30 p.m. Dec. 10, Yongsan, Main Post Club Dec. 11, Area III, TBD Dec. 13, Area III, TBD 7 p.m. Dec. 14, Camp Stanley, Reggie’s 7 p.m. Dec. 15, Camp Red Cloud, Mitchell’s 7 p.m. Dec. 16, Camp Casey, Gateway Club 7 p.m. Dec. 17, Camp Hovey, Iron Triangle Club USO Upcoming Events Join the Undercover Santa Operation jingle contest. Submit a Christmas jingle before Nov. 30, that includes the words “USO,” “Undercover Santa Operation” and describes what USO does. Winners will receive a $200 AAFES gift certificate. Senior enlisted advisors can nominate their junior enlisted servicemembers to be selected as one of 10 outstanding servicemembers to win a $200 AAFES gift certificate and a chance to win two round-trip airline tickets to the United States. Deadline for entries is Nov. 28. Volunteers are being sought to participate in a Good Neighbor event at the Camp Kim USO Dec. 14. The event will welcome Korean elementary school children and will include lunch and bowling. For information on these events, contact the local USO.

YONGSAN GARRISON –Better Opportunities for Single and unaccompanied Soldiers, or BOSS, organized a “Bargain Weekend” getaway for 40 Soldiers from throughout U.S. Forces Korea over the Nov. 11-13 holiday weekend. The tour showed servicemembers the spectacular mountains and unique cultural experiences found at Mount Sorak. Cultural tours included the Unification Observatory Tower Tour, with its scenic view of the 38th parallel; the Daepo Port Fish Market, where BOSS participants enjoyed a Korean fresh or raw fish market and restaurants; an outdoor hot spring with eight pools and four saunas; and Sorak National Park’s Unification Buddha statue monument, where worshippers pay respects and pray for unification of the north and south. The group also rode the Sorak cable car to the mountaintops and hiked to scenic overview sites at the Kwongum Castle peak and for several kilometers in Sorak Park valley to unique caves and waterfalls. Day three, the tour participants spent free time along Naksam Beach on the

Sgt. 1st Class Diane Bush, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Infantry Division, and Staff Sgt. Dorothy A. Grogan-Gardner, 8th U.S. Army Band, pose near the crest of Sorak Mountain. East Sea, one of Korea’s most popular beaches. Sorak Park Hotel played host, serving five buffet-style meals and providing four-star hotel amenity services. Many participants heaped praise on the professional tour guide company and Korea Region Office MWR and BOSS for providing such an outstanding event for the bargain price of $100. BOSS programs are offered courtesy of Morale, Welfare and Recreation. They offer a variety of opportunities for single and unaccompanied Soldiers to get involved in the community. For information on BOSS trips or activities, contact the local community activities center or call 725-6070.

COURTESY PHOTO

Female AC/DC tribute band visits Korean installations
By Korea Region MWR YONGSAN GARRISON – “Whole Lotta Rosies,” an all-female AC/DC tribute band, will be touring installations throughout Korea courtesy of Morale, Welfare and Recreation. The Los Angeles-based group was formed in 2000 by rhythm guitarist Trudi “T-Bird” Keck. She recruited the other bands members and took off on the “Highway to Hell.” Whole Lotta Rosies earned their name by packing the “House of Blues” as well as other LA hot spots. They even earned an opening spot for Alice Cooper and have toured Europe and Japan. Whole Lotta Rosies was the first all-girl AC/DC tribute band in Los Angeles and one of the first in the world. Band members include five beautiful, young and talented musicians: Keck, Sara Skelton, Melani Sisneros, Coreen Sheehan and Nancy Luca. Whole Lotta Rosies is brought to Korea by MWR. All performances are open and free of charge to military ID cardholders. Scheduled performances in Korea include: ! Friday, Camp Red Cloud’s Mitchell’s Club ! Saturday, CRC’s Mitchell’s Club ! Sunday, Camp Casey’s Gateway Club. All shows begin at 7 p.m.For information, contact the local MWR Entertainment Office or call 723-3749.

Season of Giving

SPC. VAN M. TRAN

Soldiers from 94th Military Police Battalion listen to Sgt. 1st Class Dale Niedergall, first sergeant for Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 94th MP Bn., give instructions on distributing donated food at the NamSan Orphanage Nov. 9. Dozens of MPs collected and donated nearly 2,000 pounds of food to the orphanage, which houses 56 children, ages 5 to 18.

Nov. 25, 2005

Page 21

Quarry Gate reopens at Camp Humphreys
By F. Neil Neeley
Area III Public Affairs

CAMP HUMPHREYS – ID cardholders who live off post near the southwest side of Humphreys now have easier access during their morning and afternoon commutes. The quarry gate reopened 6 a.m. Wednesday for privately owned vehicles and pedestrian traffic with a ribbon-cutting ceremony hosted by Col. Michael J. Taliento Jr., U.S. Army Area III Support Activity commander, and attended by local officials. “This gate is a symbol of partnership and cooperation,” said Taliento. Taliento expressed concern about increased traffic in the village of Bon-Jeong 2-ri and said the residents must not hesitate to

PHOTOS BY F. NEIL NEELEY

(From left) Yi In-Chae, Paeng Sung County mayor, Col. Michael J. Taliento Jr., Area III commander, Choi Kil-cheon,village chief, Bonjeong 2ri and Bae Yeon-Soo, vice chairman of the Pyeong Taek City Council, cut the ribbon at the quarry gate opening ceremony Wednesday.
communicate with him. Taliento added that he sees the open gate as a source of goodness and will lead to closer ties to the village. He expressed concern about traffic problems in the village and advised residents to communicate with him if there are any problems or issues of concern. About 25 local residents attended the ribbon cutting and served hot coffee and ginseng drinks to the security guards following the ceremony. The primary reason for reopening the gate is to reduce traffic congestion at the other gates and to allow easier access for the growing number of U.S. personnel living in that area, said Taliento. The gate is now open Monday – Friday and is for one-way traffic only. In the mornings the gate is open for inbound traffic from 6–8 a.m. The gates reopen for outbound traffic from 4–6 p.m. Taliento said there are plans to gradually increase the hours and the first change will be to open the gate at lunchtime. He asked the local residents to give him time to do things the safe way. Access is only for registered v e h i c l e s . Ta c t i c a l v e h i c l e s , commercial traffic, large vehicles and those needing vehicle and/or visitor passes must continue to use the CPX gate and may not use the quarry gate.

Chong Myong-ok has his ID checked by Kwon Yong-Kwan as he enters the quarry gate that reopened Wednesday.

2nd Combat Aviation Brigade teams with KAL
Area III Public Affairs CAMP HUMPHREYS – U.S. Army aviation has a long and distinguished history of service on the Korean peninsula with Army aviators logging hundreds of thousands of hours in various types of aircraft since the close of the Korean War. Most of these hours have been flown by helicopters. The high operational tempo combined with the salt-laden air of the peninsula has, over the years, taken a significant toll on the overall condition of the aircraft. As a result of this, many of the Army’s aircraft need major refurbishment — refurbishment that is not available in the United States because aircraft coming back from Iraq and Afghanistan have priority at all of the domestic facilities available for major maintenance. A solution was found when a partnership with Korean Airlines was created to perform maintenance on these aircraft in-country. The first Chinook CH-47D, heavy lift helicopter assigned to 2nd Battalion, 52nd Aviation Regiment (now the 2nd Combat Aviation Brigade) entered into a long-term, comprehensive refurbishment program in December 2004. The program is contracted for six years and will comprehensively refurbish, to include a complete rewire, 12 U.S. Army CH-47D need for teamwork. He also promised aircraft. Under a separate contract, KAL to attempt to speed up production of the CH-47D refurbishment rebuilt a crash-damaged process, by cutting the Black Hawk, UH-60A, contracted delivery times (MEDEVAC) also from six months to four assigned to the 2nd CAB. months.. Work on both aircraft Col. Benjamin Williams, was completed on Nov. 1, deputy commander of 2nd 2005. In a KAL-hosted CAB, complimented KAL reception to on their hospitality and the commemorate the timely manner in which occasion, J.C. Choi, vice the repairs were president of KAL, Col. Benjamin Williams completed. He also stated Aerospace Division, that he looked forward to commented on the good relations between the U.S military and continuing partnership and teamwork in KAL, and emphasized the continuing meeting future production goals.

A Chinook CH-47D, heavy lift helicopter (left) and a UH 60-A Black Hawk assigned to the 2nd Combat Aviation Brigade), are on display at the rollout held at KAL Nov. 1.

COURTESY PHOTOS

Nov. 25, 2005 22 http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly

Area III

The Morning Calm Weekly

Native American Heritage Month offers ...
PWOC Slates Fellowship Brunch From 9-11 a.m. Wednesday, at the Freedom Chapel. Guest speaker will be Jeannie Roth. Learn to make a new craft for the holiday season and enjoy a brunch provided by PWOC. Osan AES PTO sets Fall Bazaar From 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Saturday, on Osan Air Base at the elementary School located behind the Commissary. Admission is free, 30plus Vendors will be available. Bone Marrow Registration Drive slated From 9 a.m.-3.p.m. Tuesday, in the Humphreys post theater prosective donors can be screened for entry into the program, with \just some paperwork and a single tube of blood to be drawn. After that your name is placed in a national registry and only if you are needed, and after additional testing, will you be asked to actually donate bone marrow to a very needy recipient. Questions? Contact Maj. Michael Endres, chief nurse at Humphreys’ medical clinic via email at [email protected] Pet First Aid Learn the basics of handling emergencies, first aid and CPR for your pet. Class includes practice on a canine mannequin, from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. Saturday, in the Red Cross office, Building 262. Fee is $25. Attendees must be 10 years or older. Contact 753-7172/3. Baby-sitting Training Learn the information and skills necessary to provide safe and responsible care for children in the absence of parents or adult guardians. Learn skills in five critical areas: leadership, safety and safe play, basic care, first aid, and professionalism. From 6 to 8 p.m. nDec. 6-8, in the Red Cross office, Building 262. Must attend all three nights. Fee is $25. Grants are available courtesy of the United Club. Must be 11 years or older. Contact 753-7172/3. Financial Management Classes Army Community Service offers classes in financial management to help Soldiers, civilians and family members learn how to handle personal finances and the basics of savings and investments. Classes are held at ACS, Building 311. Call 753-8401 or 8403 for information or to register. By Susan Barkley
Area III Public Affairs

... a time for reflection
mother’s clans. She said Koreans and the Navajo share “He would be my little brother,” a common ancestry from Mongolia. said Todd. She said that her uncle served in the Spc. Michael Gale, 527 th Military Marines during the Korean War and Intelligence Battalion, drew on a observed that the Korean people research project he completed in high looked just like our family back school as the basis for his talk on the home. code talkers of World War II. “The culture was similar. He saw “I’m a war buff,” he said. “I a lot of hunger and devastation. He learned how our people made a just remembers how thankful people contribution.” were when they [the Marines] came. During his talk, he quoted a Navajo To him, he just saw it as an extended prophecy that family across said, “The the ocean that D i n e h needed help.” “Koreans and the [Navajo] Todd went Navajo share a common would one on to say that day save the she tells her ancestry from Mongolia ... world.” Korean co... Korean people looked He also workers that just like our family back quoted Maj. the two H o w a r d cultures share home.” Connor, 5th m a n y - Staff Sgt. Mildred Todd M a r i n e similarities. Division as “We do the saying “Had it same things, not been for sit the same the Navajos, the Marines would never way. We relate to one another have taken Iwo Jima.” through our extended families. We All three believe Native American respect our elders. Our stories are Heritage Month is an opportunity for very important. We try to learn from them to educate others. the older generation as much as we “I’ve noticed through the years can.” that most people have a notion of “It lets other people know we are Native Americans from what they see here, that we exist,” said Gale. “Until in the movies,” said Todd. She thinks last week, most of the people in my people see all Native American tribes unit didn’t know that I was an or clans as being pretty much the Indian.” same. He said people were interested in “They don’t realize that we have his background and began asking him different languages and different about his life. cultures. Over the United States and “Well, for one, they asked if we Canada there are over 500 recognized still live in teepees,” he said. They also tribes. We all have different ways of wanted to hear the stories he could life – different ways of doing things,” tell them. she added. “It’s nice to share stuff like that,” In spite of the differences, Todd he added. “It’s a good way for people finds similarities in surprising places. to represent their culture.”

CAMP HUMPHREYS – The annual Native American Heritage Month Observance, held Nov. 15 at Camp Humphreys Blackhorse dining facility, was something of a personal journey for three of the Soldiers, all at least part Navajo, who participated in the program. Staff Sgt. Mildred C. Todd, C Company, 307th Signal Battalion, Camp Carroll, wore traditional clothing including turquoise and silver jewelry handed down from her grandmother and other family members as she explained the meaning of the song “Shi Naasha,” that she said is like a national anthem for the Navajo. “My moccasins are actually a hundred years old,” she said. “My grandfather used to make the moccasins. He made them for my grandmother. Everything is handed down.” Spc. Jeremy Jensen, 527th Military Intelligence Battalion, spoke about some of the ceremonies of the Navajo and how many of the crafts, such as rugs and sand art, represent Navajo beliefs. He said his information was passed down mainly by his grandparents. He added that much of the Navajo history and culture is passed down through the language. “The only way I can communicate with my grandparents is through Navajo,” he said. Jensen said the family is very important to the Navajo and that there are no Navajo words for uncle, aunt or cousin. “All are brothers and sisters, mothers and fathers,” he said. Jensen and Todd, who are also both part Hopi, found out that they are distantly related through their

PHOTOS BY F. NEIL NEELEY

(From left) Spc. Jeremy Jensen and Spc. Michael Gale, both with the 527 th Military Intelligence Battalion, and Staff Sgt. Mildred C. Todd, C Company, 307 th Signal Battalion, share and celebrate their Native American heritage with others through the annual Native American Heritage Month Observance, held Nov. 15 at Camp Humphreys Blackhorse dining facility, .

The Morning Calm Weekly

HAES hosts monthly parenting seminars
By F. Neil Neeley
Area III Public Affairs

Area III

http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly

Nov. 25, 2005

23

F. NEIL NEELEY

Maria Albin hands out parenting materials to Tarita Harris and Rebecca Collins and daughter Sarah, at a parenting seminar at HAES.

CAMP HUMPHREYS – It’s the third Friday of the month and Maria Albin, Humphreys American Elementary School counselor, is hosting a seminar for parents on “Motivating Your Child.” “This class reinforced that I’m doing things the right way,” said Tarita Harris, mother of two HAES students. “It’s a new topic every month,” said Albin. “Last month it was ‘Establishing Learning Rituals.’” “Working with the kids is one piece of counseling at HAES,” said Albin, “but if we can work with parents and educate them too, that’s wonderful. “I want to give parents information that will help them parent better and better support their child’s education,” she said. Albin points out that parents are not born with all the different information that we need on how to support our child at school and to teach our children discipline. “Putting that information out there for people that need it is important,” she said. That information isn’t just available for parents of our students at HAES, said Albin. Her seminars are for educating all parents in the community. She welcomes all parents in the community, even those who don’t have children attending HAES, including home schoolers. “If there’s enough attendance I’ll offer an evening class in January for parents that can’t attend daytime sessions.” said Albin. For information, call Albin at 753-8894 or e-mail [email protected]

Army Family Housing Phase II sneak peek Family
By Susan Barkley
Area III Public Affairs

CAMP HUMPHREYS – About 15 people with a single purpose in mind entered the Army Family Housing Phase II site under the cover of darkness and, once inside, they began snapping photos, scribbling notes and conferring with others in the group while employees of Pumyang Construction Co. Ltd. watched and waited. A joint effort on the part of Pumyang, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Far East District and the Area III housing office,

made it possible for some Army Family Housing residents to tour two of the apartments in Phase II of the Army Family Housing project. The goal was to obtain feedback from residents so their thoughts and suggestions can be considered when future buildings are designed. “We wanted to give people a chance to come look-see at the new floor plans,” said Joan Bradford, housing chief for Area III Department of Public Works. “We wanted to get their likes and dislikes as feedback for future

PHOTOS BY SUSAN BARKLEY

(From left) R.T. Hodge, Kelly Dupeire and Maj. John Dupeire, check out the new facility.

designs.” Sandy Byrd liked the long kitchen counter and thought the new designs were “more homey.” Sgt. Maj. Terry L. Byrd said he thought the new layout had “more character” than his quarters in building 510, Phase I of the project. The new building does not have so much of an “apartment or barracks feel” said Maj. John G. Dupeire, S-3 officer, 23rd Area Support Group. “It’s more family friendly,” he said, pointing out that the balconies will be much more enjoyable for families. Kelley Dupeire was enthusiastic about the new building. She said the outside is more appealing. She liked the lights in the closets and was especially impressed with the fire alarm system. She said Army Family Housing at Camp Humphreys is “some of the best Army housing I’ve lived in.” She added that it is a sense of home. “This is first class,” said Capt. Bernita F. R. Briggs, Area III inspector general. In particular she liked the kitchen because sunlight can come in and the lazy susan she found in one of the kitchen cabinets. R.T. Hodge, Army Corps of Engineers Far East District quality assurance officer, said the remarks were pretty much what he expected. He added

Kelley Dupeire and husband Maj. John Dupeire snap photos of the new facility. that the feedback has been good and that it’s needed to improve new projects. He said that the floor plan is similar to some of the quarters in Yongsan, but added that some of the customer feedback from those projects have been incorporated into the Humphreys project. What was the hit of the night? Preinstalled curtain rods. Once they had been spotted, everyone seemed to want them installed in their quarters in building 510. Phase II is scheduled to come on line in the late spring or summer of 2006. The building will house 48 three and four bedroom units. Phase III which includes an underground parking garage is scheduled for completion in 2007.

ACS pre-Thanksgiving AC S hosts pre-Thanksgiving dinner for Soldiers
By F. Neil Neeley
Area III Public Affairs

Capt. Tonya A Barkley and her son Daxton enjoy the ACS pre-Thanksgiving dinner.

CAMP HUMPHREYS – A r m y Community Service hosted a pre-Thanksgiving dinner here Nov. 18 for about 40 Camp Humphreys Soldiers and their families. Plates were piled high with the usual holiday fare, including turkey and ham with all of the trimmings. “ACS is very kind in doing this for unaccompanied

Soldiers,” said Sgt. Cynthia A. Cargile, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Area III Support Activity. “More people need to take advantage of the programs.” Warrant Officer Justin A Roberts, 520th Maintenance Company allied trade technician, was there with four of his fellow warrant officers. “I try to let my people know about ACS programs as much as possible,” he said.

Nov. 25, 2005

Page 25

TAS volleyballers take Far East Championship
By Galen Putnam
Area IV Public Affairs

CAMP GEORGE – After an undefeated, 10-0 regular season, the Taegu American School Girls Volleyball Team rebounded from a disappointing third place finish in the Korean American Interscholastic Activities Conference Girls Volleyball Tournament to take the Girls Far East Class A Championship at the Fleet Activities U.S. Navy Base in Sasebo, Japan, Nov. 7 – 11. The Warriors topped larger schools, like Seoul Foreign School and Seoul American School during the regular season, but with everyone gunning for them at the KAIAC tournament, things turned ugly. “The big disadvantage going into a tournament undefeated is that you go in with too much confidence which can be good or bad. We also knew we had a target on us and that everybody would be gunning for us,” said first-year Varsity Coach Jennifer Sharp, who spent four years as TAS junior varsity coach. “Everybody brought their very best games when they stepped on the court against us. KAIAC wasn’t our best

The Taegu American School Girls Varsity Volleyball Team went 10-0 in the regular season and won the Far East Tournament. volleyball by far. In order to beat those teams, you have to play your best ball.” Fortunately, TAS saved the best for last, regrouping to take the Far East championship featuring nine teams from

MIKE SHARP

throughout the Pacific region. This marks only the second time a Department of Defense Dependent School has won the Far East Tournament. “I thought our season was good – we went undefeated so everything was great,” said senior Lynnette Grant, who has been playing volleyball for only two years. “We could have played a lot better than we did at KAIAC. Our hearts weren’t in it like they should have been. It felt good to come back together at Far East. We played our hearts out.” Playing with passion and bonding as a team were key factors in the Warriors’ success this year. “In past years, we would put ourselves down, but this year we would always try to pump each other up. This year’s team is much different from other years. We’ve worked very hard on that part,” said senior Melody Thompson, who has been playing volleyball for four years. “If you are willing to support other people it helps the team out because it helps you play together better.” Others agreed. “Most of us are friends from school

anyway, so to be able to play together was a big bonus,” said senior Michelle Weal, a fifth-year player. “Throughout the season nobody had an attitude and we really meshed together well. We have spent a lot of time together and it shows.” Besides the regular season and Far East team titles, several players received individual accolades as well. KAIAC awards include: Coach of the Year: Jennifer Sharp All-Conference Team: Kelli Cox (captain), Lynnette Grant, Kadijah Parker All-Tournament Team: Lynnette Grant, Kadijah Parker Tournament Best Passer: Kadijah Parker Tournament Best Server: Kadijah Parker Tournament Best Hitter: Lynnette Grant Far East Tournament awards include: All-Star Team: Kelli Cox, Lynnette Grant, Kadijah Parker Best Defender Award: Kadijah Parker Tournament Most Valuable Player: Lynnette Grant

Bone Marrow Turkey, Turkey Turkey, Registry Drive set for Thursday
Area IV Public Affairs CAMP HENRY – The Area IV Support Activity Bone Marrow Registration Drive, scheduled for Thursday, is an opportunity for community members to help those who are diagnosed with leukemia, aplastic anemia or other fatal blood diseases. An estimated 35,000 children and adults in the United States, more than 500 of them in the Department of Defense, are diagnosed each year, according to Maj. America Planas, chief nurse at Wood Medical Clinic on Camp Walker. Thursday, anyone interested in becoming a donor can visit the following facilities from 8 a.m. – 4 p.m.: Wood Medical Clinic on Camp Walker; the Camp Carroll Community Activities Center; and the Camp Hialeah Medical Clinic. While there, potential donors learn about the process, sign a consent form (DD2576) to be listed in the registry, provide additional information through a brief medial questionnaire along with a small blood sample. For information, contact Planas at 764-4222 or 011-9972-8593, or visit the Department of Defense Marrow Donor Program Web site at www.dodmarrow.com.

GALEN PUTNAM

First-grade “Pilgrims” (left to right) Jessica Putnam, Aaliyah Smith and Alyssa Austin, perform “Turkey, Turkey” along with their classmates, members of Rhonda Williams’ first-grade class, at the Taegu American School Parent Teacher Organization meeting Nov. 16. The class performed three numbers, all of which were composed by the students.

26 http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly
Commissary Closures Area IV commissaries at camps Walker, Carroll and Hialeah, as well as Fleet Activities Chinhae, will be closed Friday. The commissaries will be open for business Monday, with regular operating hours resuming Tuesday. For information, call Area IV Commissary Director Lito Miraflor at 764-5310. OHA Utility Survey Until Wednesday, the Per Diem Committee is conducting a survey of utilities and recurring maintenance expenses for Soldiers who live off post. Utility bills for the last 12 months are required for this survey. The survey can be completed by visiting https://www.perdiem.osd.mil/oha/ utility. Camp Carroll Library Hours The Camp Carroll Library is now open from noon – 9 p.m. (closed from 3 – 4 p.m. for lunch), Thursday through Monday. The library is closed Tuesdays and Wednesdays. Native American Heritage Month A Native American Heritage Month event will be held 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m., Wednesday, at the Evergreen Community Club on Camp Walker. For information, call Sgt. 1st Class Sandra B. Gaston at 768-8972. Thanksgiving Sporting Events A 3.2 kilometer run, as well as basketball and volleyball tournaments, will be Saturday and Sunday at the Camp Hialeah Fitness Center. For information about the run and volleyball tournament, call Michael Lee at 7637703. For information about the basketball tournament, call Kim Man-il at 763-7703. Employment Awareness Seminar Army Community Service will conduct an Employment Awareness Seminar from 10 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., Tuesday, at the Evergreen Community Club on Camp Walker. Registration deadline is Friday. For information, call Lettie F. Villarosa at 768-7951. Army Benefits Center Representative Visit Army Benefits Center representatives will conduct briefings on the Civil Service Retirement System from 8 a.m. – noon, Dec. 7, at the Camp Carroll Community Activities Center and from 8 a.m. – noon, Dec. 8, at the Camp Henry Theater. They will also present briefings on the Federal Employees Retirement System, from 1 – 5 p.m., Dec. 7, at the Camp Carroll CAC and from 1 - 5 p.m., Dec. 8, at the Camp Henry Theater. Registration deadline for the briefings is Monday. For information, call Kim Sang-yun at 7686625.

Nov. 25, 2005

Area IV
Area IV Support Activity Public Affairs CAMP WALKER – In four short years Alan Quartey has gone from a boxing novice to super heavyweight champion, taking the 8th U.S. Army title at Camp Casey Oct. 22. Next stop – the All Army Trial Camp and then? Quartey met with “The Morning Calm Weekly” to discuss his career and to highlight his goals as both a boxer and Soldier. Rank: Specialist Name: Alan Jesse Quartey Duty Position: Battalion command sergeant major’s driver Unit: 36th Signal Battalion Duty Station: Camp Walker Hometown: Washington D.C. Age: 27 How long in the Army? Four years, three months. Where have you been stationed: I went to basic training at Fort Sill, Okla. I went to advanced individual training at Fort Gordon, Ga., and my first duty station was Fort Bragg, N.C. What is the best thing about being in the Army? Getting to travel and meet new people, and the fact that people look at you differently (with more respect) when they find out you’re the one defending their home. The least desirable thing about being the Army? The time away from my family. I have a nephew that was born three days after I got Korea that I still haven’t seen. How long have you been in Korea? Since May 18, 2004, about a year and-a-half Tell us about your job: I get to travel a lot and see Korea. I’m the driver for Command Sgt. Maj. Tyrone Johnson of the 36th Sig. Bn. Our battalion is spread all over Korea. We have companies on Camp Walker, Camp Carroll, Camp Humphries and Camp Hialeah not to mention our brigade headquarters in Yongsan. Whenever Command

The Morning Calm Weekly

Camp Walker boxer is 8th Army champ
Sgt. Maj. Johnson has something to take care of at brigade or within the battalion we hop on the highway. Why did you start boxing? Around the time I was in AIT, my Uncle Ike Quartey had a match with Oscar DeLaHoya for the middleweight championship. My uncle didn’t win, but Alan Quartey fought well and went the distance with DeLaHoya. When I got to AIT the operations NCO, who was a boxer himself, recognized my last name and asked if I was related to Ike Quartey. So I told him ‘yes that’s my uncle’ then he asked me if I could box like my uncle. I told him I could do a little something, so he took me with him to the gym and the rest is history. When did you start boxing? 2002. Where were you at then? In AIT at Fort Gordon. Why have you continued to box? I found out I was good at it. I kept on winning so I kept on boxing. What is the best part of boxing? I’m very competitive, I’ve always played sports and I always hated losing. If you’re playing basketball or football and you lose, there’s a bunch of different people you can point a finger at but not in boxing. You are in there alone. If you lose you can’t blame a teammate or coach. It all falls on your shoulders.

See Boxer Page 28 Boxer,

Gas, Gas, Gasp

PFC. PARK KWANG-MO

Pfc. Brittany Tircuit from Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Area IV Support Activity, emerges from the gas chamber while Sgt. P .P K 1st Class Carlos D. Rivera directs her to the rally point. More than 40 Soldiers from camps Henry and Carroll went through the chamber as part of combat readiness training Nov. 17 at Camp Carroll.
FC ARK

WANG MO

The Morning Calm Weekly

Area IV

http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly

Nov. 25, 2005

27

Children, Our Responsibility Every day: day:
By Galen Putnam
Area IV Public Affairs

Family Force Forum to focus on teens
to use school as a starting point. Young Heeyoo, from the Area IV Adolescent Substance Abuse Counseling Service, will explain how to get involved with your teen. A question and answer period will follow each presentation. The forum will conclude with a panel discussion and question -and-answer period featuring the guest speakers and representatives from the Criminal Investigation Division, Judge Advocate General’s office, and the Area IV Adolescent Substance Abuse Counseling Service. Questions for the panel discussion will be accepted in advance via e-mail at [email protected] Refreshments will be provided throughout the evening. Participants who attend all four presentations and the panel discussion will receive a coupon good for a free steak dinner or pasta buffet at The Evergreen Community Club or Hilltop Club. The unit with the most attendees will receive an award recognizing their participation. Detailed schedules can be obtained by visiting Army Community Service, Building 1103 on Camp Henry and other locations in the Daegu enclave, including the Main Exchange, commissary, Morale, Welfare and Recreation clubs and more. For information, contact Stewart by e-mail or call 768-8120.

CAMP HENRY – The Area IV Support Activity is sponsoring a Family Force Forum focusing on teens and how their parents can become more involved in the lives of the soon-to-be adults in their families. The event, in conjunction with the “Month of the Military Family,” is free and open to all community members. It will be 4:30 – 8 p.m. Tuesday at the Evergreen Community Club on Camp Walker. The forum will emphasize the CORE, or, “Children, Our Responsibility Every day, ” concept. The concept, devised by Col. Donald J. Hendrix, Area IV Support Activity c o m m a n d e r, i s i n t e n d e d t o a d d r e s s i s s u e s affecting the youth living in Area IV, as well as the community at large. “This first forum will be focusing on teens. Col. Hendrix’s intent is to impress upon the parents of teens, the importance of them getting more involved with their teens and learning their interests,” said J.J. Stewart, director of Area IV Army Community Service. “The CORE concept will remain with us. Additional forums will be held in the future concentrating on other topics affecting the children within Area IV.” Several guest speakers will be on hand.

Chaplain (Col.) James Boelens, Area IV senior chaplain, who will discuss long distance relationships; Dr. Beverly Joyner, chief of Korea Region Child and Youth Services will provide tips on studying Your Child; Charles Toth, Department of Defense Dependent Schools Korea District superintendent, will discuss how

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28 http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly
Cheerleaders
two hours Monday through Friday and sometimes longer, according to senior Megan Gardner. And, during the camp, they spent even more time together. “There wasn’t much time for us to do anything except concentrate on cheering,” Gardner said. She said that their days were filled with learning a variety of cheerleading skills and techniques from camp staffers, as well as a nightly practice before the presentation of the “Spirit Stick.” According to the National Cheerleading Association Web site, “the Spirit Stick began at a cheer camp in 1954, where one team stood out among the rest. It wasn’t (so much) for their talents; rather for their attitudes ... the stick is now an integral part of the camp honors, given to teams that exemplify the spirit as defined by NCA. A first place ribbon isn’t complete without a spirit stick.” Other factors in deciding who receives the Spirit Stick are: team cohesion and performance, excellence in the classroom (the TAS squads’ cumulative grade point average is more than 3.5), and hard work and preparation. The team that wins the overall

Nov. 25, 2005

Area IV
competition isn’t necessarily the team presented with the Spirit Stick. But, for the second straight year, the TAS squad, led this year by Coach Yvonne Dickerson, was voted the award by the NCA staff. “Each night, the NCA staff selected cheerleaders to receive the Spirit Stick, but we had to give them back in the morning,” said Whitney Dalton, a senior and the cheer team captain the past two years. “Then, on the final day, they selected our team for the award.” The competition was integrated into a cheerleading camp, which drew participants from Korea, Japan and Guam. They were then required to incorporate what they learned into a two-minute routine for the final day. “In my four years of working with NCA, I have seen a lot of commitment from squads, but these girls surpass them all,” said Hollian Montgomery, a senior at Northern Illinois University who was instructing at the Far East Camp for the first time. “They stayed after to practice material and to make up their competition. They came up with a great

The Morning Calm Weekly
from Page 1 routine and their hard work paid off when they won the division.” Dickerson, who has 10 years of previous coaching experience, said, “the camp isn’t just good for the development of the teams, but for the coaches as well. Now that I’m back (after being away from coaching), this building of the pyramids is the most challenging for me. The week at (Camp) Zama offered coaching classes that taught lots of skills, including safety, that permit me to take on this challenge again.” By winning, the team also earned a bid to attend the National Cheer Championships, sponsored by the NCA, in Myrtle Beach, S.C., in April. They also won a number of additional team and individual awards, with seven of the 10 members being nominated for AllAmerica honors for their outstanding individual skill in these categories: motions, jumps, tumbling, dance, leadership and stunts. Dalton, participating in every aspect of the camp despite a hyper-extended elbow she hurt the Wednesday before the squad flew to Japan, was selected as an All-American in the leadership category. from Page 26

Boxer
Te l l u s a b o u t y o u r b o x i n g career: I have one loss on my record. It came in my second fight ever. It was at a tournament in Rock Hill, S.C. I was ahead on points, but in the second round I dislocated my shoulder. I tried to keep fighting, but amateur boxing is about safety first and since it was a tournament I got disqualified. I had to have surgery and go through six months of rehab. Since then I have won nine straight fights. What is the highlight of your boxing career? The highlight of my career, hands down, would have to be winning the 8th U.S. Army Tournament. What have you won before? When I was at Ft. Bragg, I won the North Carolina state tournament and Golden Gloves championship. Will you be going on to the AllArmy Trial Camp? Yes. I will be attending the All-Army Camp from Jan. 3 – 25. What are your boxing goals? My short term goal is to make the All-Army Team and my long term goal is to win the heavyweight championship of the world and make it to the Professional Boxing Hall of Fame. What are your goals as a Soldier? To accomplish all of my

duties in a professional manner and to be an asset to my unit, as well as my country. What are your goals as an individual? To be successful. What other sports do you participate in? I used to play basketball and football but now I ‘m just trying to focus on boxing. What is your philosophy? It takes a little more time to be a champion.

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Nov.25, 2005

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Nov. 25, 2005

Korean Language

The Morning Calm Weekly

Learn Korean Easily

Language Instructor

Word of the week

‘you-jah’
The phrase of the week

tea.” “ Please drink Korean lemon tea. ”

.
You-jah-chah due-seh-yo.
Korean lemon tea
Conversation of the week
You look sick.
Pyon-cha-nah bo-ee-seh-yo.

Please drink

I have a sore throat.
Mo-gee boo-oe-soe-yo.

Do you have a cold?
Gahm-gee due-syo-soe-yo?

Yes.
Neh.

You had better have a good rest.
Johm she-seh-yo.

Thank you.
Gahm-sah-hahm-nee-dah.

face eyes

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