The Morning Calm Korea Weekly - Oct. 7, 2005

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Volume 3, Issue 49

P UBLISHED F OR T HOSE S ERVING

IN THE

R EPUBLIC

OF

KOREA

Oct. 7, 2005

The Morning Calm Weekly is

Andong Maskdance Festival
Pages 26

Hanbok: A Korean tradition
Page 16

nline
Visit http://ima.korea.army.mil

Yongsan gate barrier project to begin Oct. 21
By Steve Davis
Area II Public Affairs

Riverwalk

DAVID MCNALLY

Thousands of Seoulites celebrate Korean Foundation Day Monday at the Cheonggye-cheon Festival. Foundation Day celebrates the mythical story of the creation of the Korean people 5,000 years ago. The recently opened “river-walk” is located in downtown Seoul.

YONGSAN GARRISON — A gate barrier project designed to enhance force protection will begin in the Yongsan area Oct. 21 and continue through December. According to Area II Support Activity Force Protection Specialist Mike Clement, in-ground pop-up barriers will be installed in stages at 10 Yongsan and Hannam Village gates. They will replace temporary pop-up barriers installed last year. Other enhancements, including new guard booths and traffic arms may be installed at some locations. “This is part of an on-going Korea-wide force protection project,” said Clement. “Additional barriers and enhancements have already been installed at Camp Humphreys and Osan Air Base.” Though the enhancements may cause temporary inconvenience, Clement said the result will be better gate security and enhanced overall force protection.

The work will require rerouting of traffic and some gate closures, said Lt. Col. Paul Legere, who heads the Area II Support Activity Directorate of Public Works. “Changes to traffic patterns will require that people be alert,” said Legere. “By working together, we will all get through this important project.” H e s a i d a c c e s s w i l l v a r y, depending on the required gate modification. “Some gates will be closed to normal traffic, but open to military police or emergency vehicles. Some will be temporarily closed to all traffic,” said Legere. “Other gates will allow inbound or outbound traffic only at designated times.” Signs will be posted at each affected gate about one week in advance of planned construction. Other internal media – such as the A r e a I I C o m m a n d e r ’s A c c e s s Channel, electronic marquees and email to tenant unit commanders – will also announce gate closures.

Peacekeepers test their ability through September ExEval
Cpl. Jung Jung-woo
8th Military Police Brigade

JANGSAN TRAINING AREA — Soldiers from the 552nd Military Police Company, 728th MP Battalion, gained a new understanding of their abilities during an External Evaluation exercise Sept. 26-30 at the Jangsan training area near Camp Hialeah. More than 50 MPs from the unit had their cordon and search, convoy security, prisoner security, and urban warfare skills scrutinized by a team of observers. “I gained confidence in war-time missions, like the Enemy Prisoner of War mission, through this EXEVAL,” said Spc. Jon-eric Bradford, 4th Platoon, 552nd MP Co. Experienced MPs from other companies also participated in the EXEVAL to support 552nd MP Co. as opposing force role-players and observers. The various missions not only tested the unit’s performance as a whole, they also tested the individual

EPW missions at the top of the Jangsan training area. One team from the 3rd Squad set up the EPW site with wire and put some desks to in process the detainees. As the Soldiers carried out their training, the observers evaluated, coached and mentored. “We evaluate the ability to handle EPW and civilian internees at the initial point of capture,” said Capt. Na Vong, 94th MP Battalion S-3, who evaluated the MPs’ performance. In the meantime, observers tested 3rd Platoon at the model urban terrain training area as they simulated an exercise. C . J J -W While 3rd Platoon members conducted training at Soldiers from 552nd Military Police Company detain an “enemy the urban site, some North Korean “sympathizers” prisoner” during an external evaluation exercise near Camp appeared and interrupted their mission. Hialeah Sept. 27. After bringing the civilians under control, each team capabilities of squad leaders, team leaders and Soldiers. See MPs, Page 4 MPs, The company’s 4th Platoon Soldiers conducted
PL UNG UNG OO

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Oct. 7, 2005

MP Blotter
The following entries were excerpted from the past several weeks military police blotters. These entries may be incomplete and do not determine the guilt or innocence of any person. At 3:45 p.m. Sept. 29 the military police station was notified telephonically of an escort violation. The desk sergeant revealed through investigation that the violation occurred when an individual was left unattended by their escort. The U.S. Forces Korea escort was transported to the Camp Humphreys Provost Marshal Office, further processed and gave a written statement admitting to the above offense. He was further processed and released to his supervisor. The escort’s ID card was confiscated and he and his guest were transported by MPs to the CPX Gate, where the guest was escorted off post. ! At 10:50 a.m. Sept. 30, the MP station was notified by radio of a curfew violation. An MP unit revealed through investigation that a Soldier was observed in an off-post club during hours of curfew. The Soldier was identified by Korean National Police, who verified he was a U.S. servicemember. The Soldier was detained and transported by MPs to the Yongsan PMO, where he was administered a portable breathalyzer test with results of 0.105 percent. The Soldier was not advised of his rights at that time due to his suspected level of intoxication. He was further processed and released to his unit. At 1 p.m. Sept. 30 he returned to the PMO, where he was advised of his legal rights that he waived, rendering a written sworn statement admitting to the above offense. ! At 3 p.m. Sept. 30, Criminal Investigation Division notified the MP station by e-mail of a wrongful use of marijuana. Investigation by the MP desk sergeant revealed Sept. 27 of a possible positive urinalysis. Investigation by USACIDC revealed probable cause to believe that at the above times, date and location a Soldier committed the offense of wrongful use of a controlled substance when he purchased and used marijuana. The unit conducted a 100 percent, commanddirected urinalysis, which resulted in the Soldier testing positive for tetrahydrocannabinal. He was advised of his legal rights, that he waived, rendering a written sworn statement admitting to the above offense.
!

Commentary Why I’m proud to drive the Army’s NASCAR Chevrolet
By Joe Nemechek
Army News Service

The Morning Calm Weekly

TEXAS MOTOR SPEEDWAY, Texas – When I first got the call to drive the Army car, I thought “… well, this’ll be neat.” But then I made my first visit to Walter Reed Army Hospital. All the people I’d been watching on the news, I got to meet those guys. And that gave me a whole new outlook what’s goin’ on in the world, and a renewed respect for what you guys and gals are doing to protect our freedom. I want to tell you that my team and I take a lot of pride in that Army car. We give 100 percent all the time, never giving up, because we know that Soldiers are pulling for us. Believe me, we want it in the front as badly as you guys do. And sometimes that’s hard, because we’ve got a lot of

competition here. are inspiring. To look at this man from We’re proud to be representing the the waist up, you’d never know he Army and its Soldiers and families, was wounded in action. especially I know a those who “Their devotion to duty and their motorcycle h a v e desire to get back to their buddies and drag racer sacrificed with two continue the fight amaze and inspire a r t i f i c i a l so much. I ’ v e legs. And he me.” visited Joe Nemechek has several several driver, Army Chevrolet sets; one for military racin’ that hospitals and met hundreds of are shorter so he can keep a low Soldiers. Their devotion to duty and center of gravity. When he goes out, their desire to get back to their buddies he wears ones that make him taller. and continue the fight amaze and People like that astound me. inspire me. It’s so great to talk to Soldiers who Yesterday in Texas I met a young tell me that they were up at 2 a.m. in Soldier, retired Spc. Robert Jackson, Iraq watching the 01 Army Chevrolet who served in Iraq in the 186th race. They sometimes tell us that they Military Police Company. Robert lost appreciate what we’re doing to give both of his legs in an attack. But the them something to pull for. That sprit and enthusiasm of this young man knowledge gives the Army racing team an extra incentive to perform each Sunday. You, who are putting your lives on the line to protect us, thank you. Without you, we who live here in America do not have our freedoms. We who race, and the people who come to watch us race by the thousands, owe you a debt of gratitude. Without you, none of this would be possible.

BUSTER’S BATTERY BUSTER’S BATTERY BUSTER’S BATTERY BUSTER’S BATTERY BUSTER’S BATTERY

TMCW submissions
Send Letters to the Editor, guest commentaries and story submissions for inclusion in The Morning Calm Weekly to: [email protected] Submissions may be mailed to: The Morning Calm Weekly c/o IMA-KORO Public Affairs Unit #15742 APO AP 96205-5742 Deadline for submission is close of business the Friday prior to the date the item is to be published.

Published by IMA-Korea Region
This Army newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The Morning Calm Weekly are not necessarily official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, Department of Defense, or Department of the Army. The editorial content of this weekly publication is the responsibility of the IMA-Korea Region, Public Affairs, APO AP 96205. Circulation: 12,500 SUBMISSIONS OR COMMENTS: Phone: DSN 738-3355 Fax: DSN 738-3356 E-mail: MorningCalmWeekly @korea.army.mil

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Area I

Commander Public Affairs Officer Staff Writer

Col. Forrest R. Newton Margaret Banish-Donaldson Spc. Stephanie Pearson

Area III

Commander Public Affairs CI Officer Staff Writer

Area II

Commander Public Affairs Officer CI Officer Staff Writers

Col. Ron C. Stephens Steve Davis David McNally Sgt. Christopher Selmek

Area IV

Commander Public Affairs CI Officer Staff writer

Support and Defend

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The Morning Calm Weekly

Captain Selection Board Convenes Oct. 14 The FY 2006 Captain Selection Board is convening Oct. 14. Eligible captains with an active duty date of rank before March 31, 2005, will be considered above the zone and an active duty date of rank of April 1, 2004, to March 31, 2005, to be considered in the zone. Eligibility for the board first requires that mandatory and optional Officer Evaluation Reports are received in HRC Alexandria by Oct. 14. Candidates may find that preparing files for the board is easier than ever, with the Army’s new capabilities to use “My Board File.” By going to https:// www.hrc.army.mil, users can navigate through their OMPF, their digital photo and their ORB. If any changes are required, documents must be sent to the selection board processing unit at HRC in Alexandria. New photograph may be uploaded through DAPMIS. For additional guidance, officers may visit their S1 or PSB. Barracks Phone Service Change Effective Nov. 1 unofficial Class B DSN telephone service to customers in government quarters and barracks will be terminated. Personnel that have this service need to visit their local telephone store to request commercial service prior to this date. For information on this change, call the local telephone store. Stars and Stripes Offers Trip Down Under Stars and Stripes, the only daily publication serving the U.S. military, is now offering one lucky winner stationed in Korea the chance to win a trip Down Under. As part of their 2005 fall subscription campaign, Stars and Stripes has started signing up Department of Defense ID cardholders throughout Korea for a chance to win a trip to Australia, according to John Panasiewicz, the newspaper’s Pacific general manager. “As part of this year’s campaign, we wanted to do something special for those stationed in Korea,” said Panasiewicz. “We have been working hard to improve our local coverage in Korea and we want people to take notice of that effort. We have also received, and are grateful, for the strong support we have gotten from the local community, including both the Navy Club and Exchange New Car Sales who helped sponsor this contest and made such a great prize possible.” No purchase is necessary to win and the deadline for entering is Oct. 31. For information on the contest or to subscribe to Stars and Stripes, call 7217140 from anywhere in Korea, or e-mail [email protected] TMCW Submissions To submit an item for use in The Morning Calm Weekly, send it to [email protected]

3 News Army launches driver safety program to reduce traffic accidents
http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly By Beth Reece
Army News Service

Oct. 7, 2005

ARLINGTON, Va. — Everyone who drives an Army vehicle must complete a new online course designed to make people think about driving safer. The Accident Avoidance Course now is available through the Army Knowledge Online Learning Management Services. All Soldiers, civilian employees and contractor employees who drive Army-owned or leased vehicles must complete the training when they start working for the Army. Refresher training must be completed every four years. The course meets the four-year refresher training requirements of Army Regulation 38555 and Army Regulation 600-55. Installation Management Agency safety officials worked with the Combat Readiness Center and the National Traffic Safety Institute to develop a course that explores how values and attitudes affect an individual’s driving behavior. Driving is one of the few critical skills that Soldiers use in both military and civilian life. Changing a Soldier’s attitude toward vehicle safety over the span of his career is key to reducing accidents, said Mario Owens, chief of Safety and Occupational Health for IMA. Training will be customized to each person using a risk assessment of driving behavior and habits. The driver’s safety course is expected to motivate people to improve driving skills, Owens said. Awareness of aggressive driving, defensive driving techniques and avoiding distractions will be emphasized through the course.

Discussion of driving under the Safety Foundation training at installations. Development of standardized Armyinfluence, substance abuse, child safety and weather factors also have been wide safety training also is expected to included in the training program. It save the Army money. “Some commands takes about an hour to complete the were spending more than $1 million a year for vehicle safety programs of all types. course. Driving accidents — both in Army The programs weren’t standardized. We should be motor More Soldiers have died behind the able to vehicles a n d wheel in fiscal 2005 than in each of the save the A r m y privatelyprevious 14 years. millions owned of dollars vehicles — are the number one killer of with a standardized course.” Owens said. Soldiers, Owens said. More Soldiers “It’s better for Soldiers as well because have died behind the wheel in fiscal it is common training they will carry 2005 than in each of the previous 14 through their Army careers.” To enroll for the online course, visit years. “Soldiers are driving more than ever Army Knowledge Online, https:// before and under a wider variety of www.us.army.mil. Click “Training” conditions than they ever [did] under the self service menu, and then previously. Soldiers must drive register through the Army’s Learning everything from passenger cars to Management System. In the welcome window, click on Humvees,” Owens said. “This contributes to accidents from human “Training Catalog.” This opens a search error and behavioral factors. The Army window, where user should enter “Army” also has more Soldiers who have never in the product name block. Then register for the Army Traffic Safety Program, driven before entering the Army.” About 25 percent of new Soldiers Accident Avoidance Course for Army do not have driver’s licenses when they Motor Vehicle Drivers. Users will receive join the Army. Standardized traffic an e-mail confirming registration. To safety courses for everyone who drives access the online course, open in the Army that incorporate “Registrations” under the welcome ALMS awareness, skills and motivation are welcome page. Click on “Transcripts,” one of the first steps in reducing and then click on “Contents.” Open accidents and improving combat “Army POV 1-3” to complete course. “The Army is committed to the public readiness, Owens said. IMA also plans to field in the next health and safety of our Soldiers and year instructors who will hold face- civilian employees. We’re convinced we to-face Army Traffic Safety Training can prevent the senseless deaths and Program classes at installations. IMA injuries that can result from irresponsible already is conducting Motorcycle behavior behind the wheel,” Owens said.

Awareness key to force protection efforts
Korea Region Office Public Affairs personal awareness: awareness of the people around them YONGSAN GARRISON — Though living in a foreign and activities around them. “By simply paying attention to their surroundings people country may be an adjustment, within can see signs of unusual, potentially the first few months many activity,” he servicemembers have settled in to their Personal Protection Keys dangerousAirman Matt said. Senior Bergmann, new duty station and are comfortable ♦Know the area you are visiting 524th Military Intelligence Battalion, serving overseas. agreed. “Terrorism is always preceded Unfortunately, comfort can become ♦Be alert to unusual/suspicious by planning steps,” he said, “and these complacency and may lead to lower activity steps are identifiable if one knows levels of force protection. Senior ♦Be aware of yoru surroundings what to look for, so be aware of your Airman John Palmer Air Force Office ♦Vary routine when traveling to surroundings.” of Special Investigations, 614th and from work “People need to trust their feelings. Detachment, said becoming too ♦ Use the buddy system when If something doesn’t look or feel right, comfortable in their daily routines could traveling off post there’s a good chance it isn’t,” added be a major contributor to military Palmer. “If a person or place gives personnel, Department of Defense ♦ Have phone numbers you a bad feeling, avoid that person civilians or family members falling available to report to or don’t go in that place.” victim to force protection threats or authorities Palmer also suggested avoiding terrorist attack. locations or activities that might isolate a “Threats to our personnel’s protection are person. “Don’t go to areas where you are the not any different in Korea than they are anywhere only American, or where there are few other people,” else in the world,” Palmer said. “The difference is that here Americans stand out more than they might somewhere he suggested. “A good rule is; if you don’t see any other else, and that makes them easier for terrorists to identify and Americans around, then you probably shouldn’t be there target.” See A wareness Page 4 wareness, Palmer said a person’s best weapon to combat this is

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Oct. 7, 2005

The Morning Calm Weekly

CPL. JUNG JUNG-WOO

Soldiers from 3rd Platoon, 552nd MP Company, equip themselves for combat readiness during Military Operations on Urban Terrain training.

AD GOES HERE

MPs
of squads conducted cordon and search missions to find enemies and weapons. “While conducting MOUT mission, what you need to do is to get the enemies under control,” said Lt. Col. Douglas Ingros, 728th MP Bn. commander. “And you should understand what is going on when you are on the cordon and search. You

from Page 1
have to keep those things in mind.” The EXEVAL will provide commanders with a detailed assessment of the company’s strengths and weaknesses, allowing them to focus the unit’s future training on maintaining a high level of combat readiness. “You were much more improved through this evaluation,” said Ingros, during the after Action Review.

Awareness
either. “Also, stay out of areas that are oneway-in, one-way-out in design. You want to always be aware of your surrounding and always know where you are and how to get safely home.” Though he said Seoul holds no greater threat of terrorist activity than any other part of Korea, Palmer said that like big cities around the world, it holds dangers unique to an urban setting. “Like all cities, people who live here will tell you there are places you shouldn’t go,” he said. “They aren’t necessarily terrorist threats but there are areas and activities in a big city that our personnel shouldn’t be a part of.” To help avoid these places and activities, Palmer suggested servicemembers consult their local Off Limits List before heading out on the town. Each Area commander has placed certain businesses and areas off limits to military personnel. Reasons for a location being deemed “off limits” can vary from reports of illegal activity to elevated force protection threats. Regardless of the reason, a servicemember found in an off-limits establishment or area can be subject to judicial or non-judicial punishment. Location is not the biggest factor in identifying threats and avoiding trouble,

from Page 3
though. Palmer and Bergmann agreed that the main thing to monitor is the activities and people around you. “Bad things can happen anywhere. By focusing on the activities of the people around you, though, you can identify behavior that is out of place or suspicious — and may be an indicator that a person is a threat,” he said. Palmer said signs of unusual activity include watching or photographing businesses or apartment buildings frequented by Americans; someone continually writing down information while apparently watching a person or place, focusing on specific details. “For example, if a person appears to be counting people on a bus or in a store, that may be an indicator they are gathering information to be used later,” Palmer said. He added that if observed, such activities should be reported to his office or to the military police. The main thing, said Bergmann, is to stay alert. “You are the first line of defense in combating threats to DoD personnel and Korean citizens.” “Always maintain a level of awareness, wherever you go,” added Palmer. “It’s the best defense against becoming a victim and it’s the one thing terrorists can’t prevent or take away.”

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Have an item for The Morning Calm Weekly? Send story and photo submissions, comments, suggestions and other items by e-mail to [email protected] For all submitted items include a point of contact name and telephone number. Deadline for submissions is close of business the Friday prior to the date the item is to be published. For information, call 738-3355.

Oct. 7, 2005

Page 5

The vote is in: Military Idol is a hit
By Spc. Stephanie Pearson
Area I Public Affairs

CAMP CASEY — The Gateway Club was packed Saturday afternoon as the final round of competition kicked off. Backstage, singers paced, warming up their voices, checking their outfits and praying the crowd would love them. In the audience, Soldiers, civilians and family members waited with ballots in hand to choose the first Area I Military Idol. The Military Idol competition is a Community and Family Support Center program based on, and in coordination with, popular reality television show “American Idol.” Soldiers who think they have what it takes auditioned Labor Day weekend at preliminary round competitions on Camps Casey and Red Cloud, singing without accompaniment for a panel of three of judges. The judges picked 10 hopefuls from each camp to compete in a semifinal round Sept. 30 at the Camp Red Cloud theater. This time it was the audience members who voted for their favorites, choosing 10

Sgt. 1st Class Ken Roberts, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 501st Corps Support Group, sings “ Johnny B. Goode” in the Military Idol competition Saturday at Camp Casey. Roberts came in second place.

PHOTOS

BY

SPC. STEPHANIE PEARSON

Col. Michael Feil, 1st Heavy Brigade Combat Team commander, played the role of “mean judge” Simon Cowell in Saturday’s competition.

singers to move on to the final round. Nine showed up to put their talent to the test Saturday. “As far as Soldiers’ participation and attendance goes, this has been the most successful event in Area I,” said Command Sgt. Maj. Yolanda Lomax, master-of-ceremonies for the show. “We had more than 300 people come to the semifinals, and about 220 showed up to the final round competition.” During the hour-and-a-half show, Warrior Country’s best voices sang a mix of rhythm and blues, country and pop songs in an attempt to win over the audience. When the votes were tallied, Spc. Sonya Hackman, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Area I, was named Military Idol for here soulful performance of Deborah Cox’s “How Did You Get Here?” (See related story, below.) “She put on a great show,” Lomax said of Hackman’s win. “Although she’s an outstanding singer, she also drew the audience in through her performance, which really set her apart.” As the Area I Idol, Hackman won $500 and a trip to Fort Gordon, Ga., to compete in the Department of the Army level Military Idol. The winner of that competition will get the chance to audition for “American Idol.” Sgt. 1st Class Ken Roberts, HHC, 501st Corps Support Group, took home second place and $250 for his rock ‘n’ roll performance of the classic song “Johnny B. Goode.” Singing Alicia Keys’ “If I Ain’t Got You,” Sgt. Shwon Brooks, Company B, 702nd Combat Support Battalion was awarded $100 for her third-place finish. E-mail [email protected]

Area I Soldier wins singing competition
By Spc. Stephanie Pearson
Area I Public Affairs

CAMP CASEY — Spc. Sonya Hackman, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Area I, almost didn’t compete in the final round of the Military Idol competition. “I had so much going on at the time,” Hackman explained. “I’m preparing for the promotion board and going to school, and I had mid-term exams, a Class-A and barracks inspection, and Military Idol finals all in one week. I was trying to prioritize, and at the time Military Idol seemed like the lowest thing on my list.” Luckily, Hackman found the time to squeeze it in, and now she is thankful she did. Hackman is the first Area I Military Idol, winning the title Saturday at the Gateway Club. “I couldn’t believe I won,” Hackman said. “If you think about it, I’m just a little country girl from east Texas who grew up singing in her granddaddy’s church. Who would have thought I’d ever compete in an Idol competition and win?” New fan Pfc. Garry Beniquez, also from HHC, Area I, said he was surprised when he heard her sing at the Camp Red Cloud Labor Day Block Party Sept. 5. “Before then, I had no idea she would get as far

as she did,” he said. “I just wanted to support her because she’s in my company. I didn’t know she could sing like that.” Beniquez joined a group of Soldiers from CRC who made the trip to Camp Casey to support Hackman, and said he knew she would win. “As soon as she went up on stage I knew it,” he said. “She was great -- nobody even compared to her.” The crowd apparently agreed, rising to their feet to give Hackman a standing ovation for her soulful rendition of Deborah Cox’s song “How Did You Get Here?”

See Winner Page 7 Winner,

PHOTOS

BY

SPC. STEPHANIE PEARSON

Soldiers from HHC, Area I cheer for Hackman at the Military Idol competition Saturday. “Their believing in me helped me believe in myself,” Hackman said of their support.

Spc. Sonya Hackman, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Area I, sings Deborah Cox’s song “How Did You Get Here?” for her competition-winning Military Idol performance Saturday at Camp Casey’s Gateway Club.

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Oct. 7, 2005

Area I Community recognizes volunteers
By Spc. Stephanie Pearson
Area I Public Affairs

The Morning Calm Weekly

Stars of Tomorrow The Area I Entertainment Office will host the Stars of Tomorrow talent show 7 p.m. Saturday at Camp Casey’s Gateway Club. Oktoberfest and Volksmarch The Camp Stanley Community Activity Center will host an Oktoberfest party and Volksmarch Monday. The 10-km walk/run Volksmarch will begin at 8 a.m. Tshirts will be given to the first 100 people to register, and prizes will be awarded to the first three runners to finish. The event will feature German food, beverages and music, raffle drawings, live performances from the 2nd Infantry Division Band and a demonstration by the 2ID Tae Kwon Do Team. Holiday Greetings The 2005 Holiday Greetings film crew will be at the Camp Casey food court 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Tuesday; in front of Freeman Hall on Camp Red Cloud 8-11 a.m. Wednesday; and in front of the Camp Stanley Post Exchange 1-5 p.m. Wednesday. Hispanic Heritage Celebration The 2nd Infantry Division and Area I Equal Opportunity Offices will host a Hispanic Heritage event at noon Oct. 14 at the Commanding General’s Mess on Camp Red Cloud. Sgt. Maj. Angel Maldonado, U.S. Army Garrison, Camp Casey will be the guest speaker. Hispanic Heritage Essay Contest The 2nd Infantry Division and Area I Equal Opportunity Offices are holding a Hispanic Heritage essay contest. The topic is “Hispanic Americans: Strong and Colorful Threads in the American Fabric.” Entries should be one-and-ahalf-pages long, and must be submitted to the 2ID EO office no later than 4 p.m. Wednesday. The winning entry will be read at the Hispanic Heritage event Oct. 14. Family Readiness Symposium Area I Army Community Service is hosting the second Family Readiness Group Symposium 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 25 at the Camp Casey ACS classroom. The meeting is to provide all unit family readiness group liaisons and leaders with continued training, guidance, and support for their FRG groups. NEO Volunteers Needed Department of Defense family members and civilian employees can volunteer to participate in a U.S. Forces Koreasponsored trip as part of the upcoming Noncombatant Evacuation Operation exercise Oct. 28-30. Call Capt. Renante Lasala at 732-7403 for information.

CAMP CASEY — Area I and 2nd Infantry Division officials honored local volunteers Sept. 27 at a Warrior's Club luncheon. Col. William Forrester, assistant division commander, and Col. Forrest Newton, Area I commander, presented certificates to 13 volunteers and two units during the quarterly recognition event. “Let us pay back our volunteers by recognizing their efforts to make our community a cohesive team,” said Joseph Gall, Army Community Service. “We cannot affix a price tag to volunteering but if we could, our volunteers have given back more than $103,000 to our community this past quarter.” Guest speaker Davis Tindoll, Installation Management Agency, Korea Region deputy director, said that while saving money is great, volunteers are most valued for their effect on the community. “We can provide funding for the building of an infrastructure or the funding to build well-being programs,” Tindoll said, “but I don't know that structures or programs can build up individuals and their relationships. People with a sense of personal responsibility, shared experience and a commitment beyond

SPC STEPHANIE PEARSON

Volunteer of the Quarter John Gunter repairs a broken couch at the USO Saturday. Gunter helps the USO save money by doing minor repairs when he volunteers there. themselves are needed to build a community.” One individual and one unit were selected as Volunteer and Volunteer Unit of the Quarter. Nominated for his service with the USO, John Gunter was recognized as Volunteer of the Quarter. Gunter gave more than 250 hours of service supporting USO activities this quarter. Gunter explained that he used to work at the USO, and since he knows how things operate he is happy to go back to help out in his free time.

“I volunteer here between 10 and 20 hours a week,” he said. “I do anything and everything -- go out with the mobile canteen, help out at various functions hosted by the USO and even do small repairs.” While he appreciated being recognized at the luncheon, Gunter said his true reward is the satisfaction of seeing Soldiers enjoy the USO. “This place is for Soldiers to use, to be a home away from home, where they can come to relax," Gunter said. “I don't volunteer here to be recognized; I just like to help people.” The Volunteer Unit of the Quarter award went to 2nd Battlion, 9th Infantry Regiment, and was accepted by Battalion Commander Lt. Col. Ryan Kuhn and Command Sgt. Maj. Jason Silsby. Soldiers from 2-9 Inf. donated more than 2,850 volunteer hours, from teaching Enlish, hosting birthday parties and helping maintain facilities at local orphanages to cooking food and hosting events at Camp Casey chapels. “When it comes to volunteering, Manchus keep up the fire,” Gall said. The luncheon ended with a special award presented on behalf of the American Red Cross. Paul Henevich, a volunteer with the

See Volunteers Page 7 olunteers,

Korean Service Corps moves to Camp Stanley
By Margaret Banish-Donaldson
Area I Public Affairs

CAMP STANLEY — The 15th Korean Service Corps Company has a new home. The company moved from Camp Red Cloud to Camp Stanley Sept. 30 as part of the 2nd Infantry Division transformation. To improve the work environment of the KSC Company, Building 2383 was renovated for their new offices. In addition to minor repairs, officials had the roof fixed, walls painted and doors replaced in preparation of the unit’s transition. At a cost of $42,000 and a little over one month’s work, William Kapaku, deputy to the CRC garrison commander, said the 15th KSC now has a worldclass facility. “We culminated that action with today’s ribbon-cutting ceremony,” said Kapaku. “This is our Area I and CRC garrison commitment to a proud and strong partnership with the Korean Service Corps, who have always answered our calls for fire to support the warfighter here on the Korean peninsula.” In March 1954, the 15th KSC Company was formed in Uijeongbu with 350 personnel to support the Special Troops Unit, Headquarters, I Corps Group at Camp Red Cloud. The 15th KSC combined with the 20th KSC in July 1971; in September 1992, the 15th KSC Co. began to support the U.S. Army garrison. “Across the peninsula, the 15th KSC Company is composed of Korean National indirect-hire civilians who perform combat service support duties,” said Hwang Sunkun, 15th KSC Co. commander. The KSC supports the activities of the 2nd Infantry Division, 19th Theater Support Command, 18th Medical Command and the Defense Commissary Agency.

COURTESY PHOTO

Kang Yun-mo, 15th Korean Service Corps, inspects his protective mask during common-task testing in September. Common-task testing is an annual requirement for KSC employees. “The 15th also provides an 8th U.S. Army mobile labor force,” Hwang added. At present, the roles of the company are designed to parallel the wartime mission as closely as possible, and to provide an experience base for expansion in the event of contingencies. Today, there are 183 personnel to support these area units. “We will continue to support the Area I and 2nd Infantry Division units from our new location at Camp Stanley like we did at Camp Red Cloud, and stand side-by-side with our U.S. troops,” Hwang said. The CRC Department of Public Works is also scheduled to move to Camp Stanley by Oct. 15. E-mail [email protected]

The Morning Calm Weekly

Camp Casey rugger earns chance to try for All-Army team try
By Spc. Timothy W. Dinneen
2nd Infantry Division Public Affairs

Area I

http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly

Oct. 7, 2005

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CAMP CASEY — High in the Appalachian Mountains under a steel grey sky dropping fresh white snow on a field, a rugby player is playing in his first game. The former golfer is exhilarated by the nonstop action and ferocity of his newly adopted sport. Although cold, sweat drips from his face as he wanders aimlessly through the mist of crystallized breathing from teammates and adversaries. Through all the confusion and mayhem of that first match, Pfc. James Cameron, a track mechanic with 302nd Brigade Support Battalion, discovered a game that would lead him farther than down a field: it would lead him to the AllArmy Rugby tryouts at Fort Lewis, Wash. Cameron has been playing rugby for six years, splitting his time between Appalachia State and a division one men’s club in Worcester, Mass. An avid golfer in high school, he changed gears to a more physical challenge when college friends sparked his interest in the sport. “It’s like a brotherhood,” Cameron said of his new love. Cameron said the first thing he looks for when arriving in a new town is getting involved with a rugby team. When he arrived at Camp Casey last February, he saw a poster advertising the post rugby team. Jumping at the chance, Cameron became one of the first five members of a rugby team. He is now the team president. As his play throughout the year improved, he decided to pursue an opportunity to try out for the All-Army team after seeing another poster. While it was a lengthy process assuring

all the paperwork was correct and getting all the needed recommendations from previous coaches, Cameron said it was worth it. “Being selected to try out for the AllArmy Rugby team builds confidence,” Cameron said, “because I look better as a Soldier and an athlete.” Cameron explained that playing rugby makes you a better Soldier because it takes a lot of discipline to practice and courage to continue getting up when you get knocked down. Cameron’s supervisors are behind him all the way. “I support it 100 percent, and the senior leadership supports the event,” said Staff Sgt. Erick A. Palacio, 302nd BSB. Cameron is among only a handful of players chosen for the tryouts from an Army-wide search for talent. The week-long tryout (that started Wednedsday and will continue thru Oct. 16) will eliminate all but the best, ultimately fielding a team of 25 to 30 players to represent the Army. The All-Army team will then compete in a tournament at Camp La Jeune, N.C., against all-star teams from every service branch in the military. Because of how well he’s been playing this year, Cameron said he thinks his chances are pretty good of making the team, but he expects a completely different level of training and coaching once he gets there. Only time will tell if Cameron will make the team, but one thing is for sure: he’ll continue to play the sport he loves as long as there is a poster pointing him in the right direction. E-mail [email protected]

SPC. STEPHANIE PEARSON

Pfc. James Cameron, 302nd Brigade Support Battalion, holds onto the ball for Camp Casey as a Camp Humphreys rugger tackles him Sept. 10 at the 8th U.S. Army Rugby Championship at Camp Casey’s Schoonover Bowl. Cameron was selected to try out for the All-Army Rugby team at Fort Lewis, Wash., Wednesday thru Oct. 16.

Winner

from Page 5
Even the judges were impressed. “I would gladly leave my job today to be your manager,” said Denise James, Area I Morale, Welfare and Recreation director, in her after-performance critique. Now that she has won over audiences in Korea, the next stop for Hackman is Fort Gordon, Ga., where she will compete in the All-Army Military Idol for a chance to audition for popular reality television show “American Idol.” Hackman said she is excited, but not yet nervous. “When I go to Fort Gordon, I’ll have the support of my family and really close friends who are driving up from Texas to see me,” she explained. “I’m happy the crowd chose me to represent Area I, and I will do my best to live up to their expectations there.” Hackman said she used to dream about pursuing a career in music, but her priorities shifted as she grew older. “When my son was born, he became my focus,” she said. “After that, pursuing music was just a dream I once had. But now it feels like it’s becoming a reality for me.” Hackman said she is grateful for the opportunity the competition has given her, and encourages her fellow Soldiers to take advantage of programs like Military Idol and Stars of Tomorrow. “I never thought joining the Army would bring me closer to my dream of singing,” she said. “This just goes to show that you should never give up on your dreams. Even a Soldier can be a star. We’re already heroes.” E-mail [email protected]

Volunteers

from Page 6

SPC. STEPHANIE PEARSON

Camp Red Cloud chapter of the ARC, was recognized for his help responding to a man who collapsed December 2003 at an aquatic facility in Orlando, Fla. Henevich's quick action and skill helped save the man's life. Gall said the ARC wanted to recognize Henevich for his “devotion to duty, selfless volunteerism and upholding the highest standards of the American Red Cross.” The ACS has 125 registered volunteers in Area I. Tindoll said he was surprised by the number, since volunteers are usually family members and Area I is a noncommand sponsored area. “Life in Area I is a challenge for you,” he said, addressing the volunteers. “I truly appreciate the sacrifices you make each and every day for the Soldiers, civilians and families of Area I. In the midst of all we do, we should not forget to celebrate and cultivate the role of the volunteer.” E-mail [email protected]

Hackman competes Sept. 5 in the preliminary round of the Military Idol competition at Camp Red Cloud’s Labor Day Block Party.

Oct. 7, 2005

Page 9

X-ray Yongsan Security officials to X-ray Yongsan vehicles
By Sgt. Christopher Selmek
Area II Public Affairs

YONGSAN GARRISON — Security officials hailed the arrival of a new mobile scanning system Sept. 23 with a technology demonstration at the Area II headquarters parking lot. The $790,000 Mercedes-Benz Sprinter truck scans vehicles it passes and produces high-resolution, realtime X-rays. “We simply turn it on and have cars drive past us so we can scan them,” said Robert Britton, a technical training specialist with American Science and Engineering, the developer and contractor for the technology. “It sends X-rays out into the vehicles and examines the signals we get back to create a complete digitized map of the interior of the vehicle,” he explained. Britton said parts of the technology have been around for at least 15 years; however, his company developed and patented a unique “back-scatter technique,” which allows for unprecedented mobility. Kim Kwang-su gets into the new Back-scatter mobile screening system at technology involves the Yongsan Army Garrison. ability to create X-ray images without using a detector on the other side. The current model fits into one side the van. It can X-ray vehicles while driving through a parking lot, or as vehicles drive past it. “This is very useful,” said Korean security guard Kim Ku-hyun. “I could not have imagined this type of technology existed.” Kim said he learned how regular X-ray technology

Donations flow into American Red Cross
By Cpl. Seo Ki-chul
Area II Public Affairs

uses transmissions instead of reflection techniques. The Korean guards are two of six Yongsan security officials who attended a two-day training session Sept. 26-27 with the mobile scanner manufacturer. “We feel very excited to learn about this technology,” said Kim Kwang-su, one of the guards. “We teach operators to look for anomalies and asymmetries,” Britton said. “Anomalies are like ‘Sesame Street,’ you P D MN know, one of these things Korean security guard Kim Ku-hyun (right) and Kim Kwang-su review a scanned X-ray image of is not like the other. Almost anything man- a vehicle waiting to enter Yongsan Army Garrison Sept. 27. made is more or less symmetrical in design, but if you’re trying to smuggle something, you might pack a wheel-well or something not quite obvious and we can pick that up.” Britton said the mobile system looks for things standard technology cannot pick up. “Where most machines just look for metal,” he said, “we can pick up organic material as well.” The class was challenging, Britton said, because of the language barrier. “However, our systems are very graphical,” he explained. “We designed the interface to be easy to use.” Britton said the mobile scanner is an important part The X-ray van (right) drives past two unoccupied vehicles waiting to enter Yongsan. Officials said the new technology will enable See X-ray Page 12 X-ray, security guards to better evaluate potential threats.
HOTOS BY AVID

C ALLY

YONGSAN GARRISON — Hurricane relief donations at Yongsan and across the peninsula have come from young and old, Koreans and Americans and many people in between. More than $87,967 has been donated to the Yongsan American Red Cross office and $ 132,680 Korea-wide since Hurricane Katrina slammed into New Orleans Aug. 30, followed by Hurricane Rita, which ripped into the TexasLouisiana coastline Sep. 21. The sight of devastated cities and American refugees prompted people worldwide to open their hearts – and their pocketbooks – in an effort to help. American Red Cross Korea Hub Manager Ahava Martin characterized the outpouring of kindness in one word. “Wonderful,” she said of the donations received already. Martin said many people are donating online, so it’s hard to track the number of contributions coming from Korea. But, many donors are also taking checks directly to her.

One of the youngest donors was 8year-old Diana Marcos, who celebrated her birthday by donating $155. “I want to help Hurricane Katrina and Rita victims, including the kids,” said Marcos, who asked her friends to give her birthday money instead of gifts. She presented the money to the Red Cross Sept. 27. Marcos said the money could buy food, videos, notepads, crayons and other supplies so kids can draw or write poems. “I’m really concerned for the kids, and I want to help calm them down,” said Marcos, daughter of Lt. Col. Elmer Marcos and Maj. Nora Marcos. Martin said 20 Red Cross youth volunteers are raising money at community activities. “Lots of other individuals, groups and military units are getting involved, including the Korean community,” Martin said. She said Korean groups had been extremely generous. More than $75,000 had been donated by Korean businessmen or groups by the end of

September. Wang Sang-eun, president of the Korean-American Friendship Association, presented $10,000 from the group and later an additional $10,000 of his own money. “As many of you know, the United States has been helping Koreans whenever they were in trouble,” said Wang. “In light of their sacrifice and contribution to my country, this donation is just a small token of appreciation for them.” Le Meilleur Construction Company, Ltd. President Chung Kyung-tae donated $15,000 on behalf of his company, which coordinates construction projects for U.S. Forces Korea. “For a long time, the United States has been supporting Korea financially and politically,” said Chung. “We were looking for a way to return that great favor and this donation turned out to be a timely opportunity.” Cho Tae-kwon, president of Gwangju Ceramics and a member of the Korean-

Yongsan American Red Cross to hold open house
Area II Public Affairs YONGSAN GARRISON — The American Red Cross Yongsan office will have an open house 12:30-2 p.m. Oct. 17 and the entire community is invited. “We want everyone to see our new look and get acquainted with our staff and volunteers,” said Donna Coggin, American Red Cross Korea advisor. Coggin said the office has received new furniture, computers and services thanks to various individuals and organizations at Yongsan and throughout Korea. “We are going to honor those folks during the open house,” said Coggin. The Yongsan American Red Cross offices are on the second floor of the Moyer Community Services Center. For information, call 738-3670.

See Donations Page 12 Donations,

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Oct. 7, 2005

http://ima.korea.army.mil/area2

Family rally draws hundreds
By Cpl. Seo Ki-chul
Area II Public Affairs

Area II

The Morning Calm Weekly

Fire Prevention Week The Yongsan Fire Department will host an open house and barbecue around 11 a.m. Saturday following the Columbus Day Parade. Other Fire Prevention Week activities are planned, including smoke training at the Yongsan Fire Station 10 a.m.- 4 p.m. Tuesday; a fire truck visit to the Mustard Seed CDC at 10:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. Wednesday and fire extinguisher and safety training at various locations through Oct. 15. For information, call 738-5200. Holiday Greetings The Hometown News Holiday Greetings Team will be at the Dragon Hill Lodge Oasis Courtyard 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Oct. 17-18 to videotape greetings from servicemembers, retirees, Department of Defense civilians and family members. The greetings will be shown on hometown TV stations. Inclement weather location is indoors at Market Square. Duty uniform is required, or appropriate clothing for civilians. For information, call 7387355. Old School Dance Alpha Phi Alpha will host the fourth annual Old School Dance 9 p.m. Oct. 22 at the Dragon Hill Lodge ballroom. Dress in your old school gear and dance until 2 a.m. Cost is $10 advance or $12 at the door. All proceeds go toward scholarships given annually to high school students. For information, call Riakos Adams at 010-3125-2494. NEO Volunteers Needed Department of Defense family members and non-essential civilian employees can volunteer to participate in a USFKfunded international trip as part of the upcoming NEO exercise, Oct. 28-30. Deadline for sign-up is Wednesday. Contact your unit NEO warden or call 738-8563 for information. Housing Office Closures The Area II Housing Office will be closed Monday for Columbus Day and Oct. 21 for a Department of Public Works Organization Day. For information, call 738-4069. Volunteer of the Quarter Congratulate fourth Quarter Area II nominees and winners at the Volunteer of the Quarter recognition ceremony 3-4:30 p.m. Oct. 19 at the Community Service Building, Room 118. Everyone is welcome. Refreshments will be served. For information, call 738-5467. Class B Telephone Service Unofficial Class B DSN telephone service for customers in government quarters and barracks will be terminated Nov. 1. Area II personnel who have this service should visit their local phone store in the Community Service Building, Bldg. 4106 upstairs, to request commercial service. For information, call 738-3400.

YONGSAN GARRISON — More than 400 people and a dozen organizations gathered for a Family Readiness Group rally Saturday in the Seoul American High School Falcon Gymnasium. “My definition of the Family Readiness Group is a bunch of caring people who help each other no matter what,” said Area II Commander, Col. Ron Stephens. “Family Readiness experts are ready to provide resources and support your need for total family readiness.” Stephens encouraged the family members to share ideas. “Knowledge is power,” he said. Army Community Service officials coordinate a rally every March and October in hopes of making Area II families more aware of available services and programs. The American Red Cross, 18th Medical Command, 164th Air Traffic Services FRG and many other organizations set up booths and tables to inform families of useful resources and available support while promoting their programs. “These organizations provide services to the community,” said Edwin Morales-Aviles, event coordinator. “During deployment, they provide assistance to family members.” The FRG is a unit-level group, which serves family members by providing an avenue of mutual support, assistance and a network of communication among family members and community resources. As a result, it contributes to Soldiers’ ability to devote full attention to the mission by offering reassurance

Michelle Bremer paints Jasmine Williams’ face at the Family Readiness Group Rally Saturday at Seoul American High School. to family members, Morales-Aviles said. Capt. Bryan Green, 524th Military Intelligence Battalion, shared his experience of the efficient support rendered by the FRG at his previous duty station. “My wife was hospitalized for two months with the expected delivery of our baby,” Green said. “The FRG provided me and my infant son with meals for two months while we were waiting for the baby. That itself was a very special connection, because the FRG not only provides support for the Army as a whole, but they also provided it on an individual basis.” Morales-Aviles explained how the rally affects the community. “The Family Readiness Group rally serves as a forum to find out just how well-prepared we are to maintain our

CPL. SEO KI-CHUL

unit family readiness,” Morales-Aviles said. “The rally deals with the state of preparedness of military families through proactive education and support programs that promote selfreliance and enhance family well-being.” Officials conducted raffles, while face-painting and tae kwon do demonstrations at the rally served to spark people’s interest and draw them to the high school. One participant remarked that the rally turned out to be very successful and informative overall. “It’s a wonderful event,” said Lt. Col. Bob Loynd, U.S. Forces Korea policy officer. “It demonstrates how well this community takes care of the welfare of the families.” E-mail [email protected]

Employment and Volunteer Fair attracts job seekers
By Steve Davis
Area II Public Affairs

YONGSAN GARRISON — Jobless in Korea since arriving nine months ago, Brenna Franklin and friend Charlotte Martin entered the Area II Employment and Volunteer Job Fair Sept. 30 without illusion. “It’s difficult finding work in Korea,” said Franklin, a federal student loan officer before moving to Yongsan from Dublin, Ohio. She said she has applied for “countless numbers” of paying jobs and is now considering volunteering until she finds one. Martin, who had her own salon and barbershop four years while living near Camp Lejeune, N.C., said it was tough giving

Charlotte Martin (left) and Brenna Franklin discuss opportunities Sept. 30 with Eskeletha Dorsey at an employment and volunteer job fair.

STEVE DAVIS

up her business to accompany her Marine husband to an overseas duty station. “I’ve always been the kind of person to create my own job, but there are no opportunities here for [American] hair stylists,” she said. “It’s kind of disheartening when you are used to always having employment, then not having any and trying to get acclimated to a new country at the same time. It can be daunting.” So together they visited the job fair at Dragon Hill Lodge hosted by Army Community Service and sponsored by the American Forces Spouses Club and the Association of the U.S. Army. More than 160 job seekers attended. Area II ACS Employment Readiness Program Manager Doris Lebby said they conduct the fair twice a year. Fifteen information tables and 17 volunteer organizations attended to help employment seekers succeed. “Your attendance here today proves that employment and volunteering are important factors for the quality of life in Area II,” Lebby said during the opening ceremony. “There is a broad base of community support for spouse employment and volunteering.” Attendees could attend any of 10 sessions during the sixhour fair to learn about resume writing, the Army’s Resumix employment application system, interviewing, dressing for success, volunteering and other topics, including opportunities with Department of Defense Dependent Schools and Dragon Hill Lodge. Area II Civilian Personnel Advisory Center Director Ken

See Employment Page 11 Employment,

The Morning Calm Weekly

Employment

from Page 10

Stark said during an interview with The Morning Calm Weekly that there is “a multitude” of jobs in Korea. “People just need to keep looking at the various vacancy announcements,” he said, referring to the Army vacancy announcements at http://cpol.army.mil. Stark said volunteering may help job seekers get valuable experience too. “We have a lot of people who volunteer, and when a position comes open they may have an edge if management knows their abilities and good work habits,” Stark said. He said those family members who left a government job to come overseas with a spouse may qualify as a “ ‘status eligible’ applicant who is eligible for non-competitive appointment to positions that we are recruiting for. “While there is no guarantee that the family member will be selected as a non-competitive eligible candidate, it is an excellent opportunity for fast fills for everyone involved in the recruitment process; while at the same time placing well qualified family members into positions that they are qualified for,” Stark said. Stark said the Civilian Personnel Advisory Center will help people who have questions about job applications or why they were not selected for a position. Computers are available at the Civilian Personnel Advisory Center and at the Army Community Service Employment Readiness Office for job applicants. Lebby said the next job and volunteer fair will be in April or May. In the meantime, resources and classes are available year-round for job seekers and volunteers. For information, visit the ACS Employment Readiness Office in the Community Service Building, Bldg. 4106, Room 214, on Yongsan South Post beside Popeye’s, or call 738-8977. E-mail [email protected]

11 Area II Columbus Day celebration to include parade, festival
http://ima.korea.army.mil/area2

Oct. 7, 2005

Area II Public Affairs YONGSAN GARRISON — Yongsan Morale, Welfare and Recreation officials are making final preparations for a spectacular Columbus Day celebration to be held Saturday with a parade, a community carnival, top-name Korean entertainers and activities. “A big Columbus Day celebration is a Yongsan tradition,” said Area II Recreation Director Mario Farrulla. “Last year, we had more than 6,000 visitors and hope for more this year.” The parade will begin at the commissary at 10 a.m. and proceed along X Corps Boulevard to the Collier Field House area. In addition to military and civilian identification card holders, American citizens with a U.S. passport and their family members will have access to Yongsan South Post. Korean employees with current post passes and immediate families (spouses and children only) will also be allowed on post. Officials will issue additional special access passes to vendors, invited guests and entertainers. Guests with special access passes must present a valid personal identification card with photograph

along with the Morale, Welfare and Recreation special access pass, that has been approved through the Area II Law and Order Office. People holding special passes must enter through Gate 17. To apply for an MWR special access pass, call 738-5354. Williams Avenue will be closed Thursday night for the Combined Forces Command Organization Day and Columbus Day activities. It will reopen Saturday night. Gate 17 traffic will be routed to Vaughn Avenue. Some other streets in the carnival area may be temporarily closed. Military police will be on duty to direct traffic as needed. 10 a.m. 11:30 a.m. Noon 1 p.m. 1:50 p.m. 2 p.m. 2:10 p.m. 3:30 p.m. 4 p.m. 4:15 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 4:40 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 7:15 p.m. 7:30 p.m. Parade begins at commissary parking lot and ends at Williams Avenue near Collier Field House Parade winners announced Carnival and Kid’s Land open MWR Band Prize drawings begin Children’s contests Martial arts and ballet demonstrations MWR Offshore Band Kumdo demonstration Drawing for prizes and magic show Children’s games MWR Offshore Band Top-name Korean entertainers Drawing for plane ticket, recognition of guests and sponsors 2nd Infantry Division Pop Ensemble

Celebration Schedule

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Oct. 7, 2005

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Area II
from Page 9
regulations prohibit us from doing so,” Britton said. “If somebody does get scanned, either it’s because they’re attempting to hide in a vehicle or because they walk in front of the scanner while it’s in operation. Britton said even so, “it won’t cause any damage in the slightest.” This technology will be used in searching for bombs, smuggled goods and other forms of contraband. The mobile system is already being used for U.S. Government force protection in Iraq and Afghanistan, but this is the first time the technology has appeared in Korea. Britton said about 100 systems have been built so far. Oxendine said they plan for Korean security teams to train with the van and use it for random gate checks, but the possibilities for the future are limitless. “This is going to be a very mobile, efficient way of examining vehicles, and it’s a good thing for force protection,” he said. E-mail [email protected] Officials say the new X-ray technology will enable Yongsan security guards to evaluate potential threats. These actual X-ray images of a Ford Explorer and HUMVEE show previously unattainable details. Guards can perform the scan by driving past a vehilce, or having the vehicle pass by the mobile scanning van.

The Morning Calm Weekly

X-ray
of providing force protection to the U.S. military. “The system prescreens vehicles,” he said, “but, it is part of a multilayer approach to security.” Company officials said the procedure is completely safe. Britton said the system emits a low amount of radiation, less than 10 micro-REMs, per scan. “To put it in everyday terms, you would have to be scanned by this 200 times to equal one airplane ride at 30,000 feet, and people get on airplanes every day,” said Area II Law and Order Officer Ricky Oxendine. “You would have to be scanned 600 times to equal one chest X-ray.” Kim Ku-hyun said he is not concerned about radiation. “They said operating the X-ray van is 10 times less dangerous than a single cigarette,” he said. As a precaution though, officials will ask people to step out and away from their vehicles before guards conduct an X-ray scan. “The reason we don’t intentionally scan people is because government

Donations
American Relations Enterprise, or KARE, donated $10,000. “My father came up with the idea after watching lots of victims suffering from this terrible disaster,” said Cho’s daughter, Cho Yun-kyung. Foreign Goods Transaction Office employees also donated $10,000. “Choi Tae-ho, the former president of the Korea Veteran’s Support Association, initiated the donation and our efforts to help out our longtime reliable ally, the U.S.,” said Lee Hyonok, Foreign Goods Transaction Office president. “I hope they regain courage and confidence as soon as possible.” President Ra Il-soo and members of the People to People International Seoul Chapter presented $5,000.

from Page 9
“We were so worried about the hurricane victims in New Orleans,” Ra said. “All of us are truly hoping the city recovers its fascinating scenery as soon as possible.” The American Forces Spouses Club at Yongsan made a $5,000 donation Monday. Martin said she is grateful to everyone who has contributed, regardless of the amount. “Every contribution helps with this massive relief effort,” she said. “The devastation is historic, and so are the contributions that will aid our long recovery.” Online contributions can be made at www.redcross.org. E-mail [email protected]

Web Visit the Area II Web site

ex Web This week read e x clusive Web stories about: !Yongsan Quartermaster Laundry keeps customers looking sharp ! Area II Soldiers join with Korean families for visitation program

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Oct. 7, 2005

Dealing with unscrupulous bill collectors
By Capt. Dave Goscha
Yongsan Legal Assistance Office

13

It is 9:30 p.m. back home, and your wife receives a call where she lives in North Carolina. You are assigned right here, working in Korea. Over the sounds of your two children in the background, she is told that you owe a debt for a credit card that you have never heard of. Over a series of four calls within one hour, a series of rude operators tell your wife that not only do you owe the debt, but that their company has the power to take your house, sue you, or arrest your wife if she does not cooperate with them by giving them a check “over the phone.” Meanwhile, your friend’s spouse, who lives in Missouri, is getting harassing calls of a similar nature, regarding a student loan debt that is supposed to be in deferment status. That debt collector is threatening to report the debt as being delinquent, thus crippling your friend’s ability to qualify for the home loan he had applied for. Real-life scenarios like this happen today, despite the fact that the bill collector’s actions noted above are illegal. The Fair Debt Collections Practice Act was written to curb overly zealous debt collectors. A debt collector is a person or agency who

is primarily in the business of collecting debts, and is not the original creditor owed money. For instance, if you owe a hospital some money, that hospital’s collections or billing department is not a “debt collector” within the meaning of the statute. The actions of an outside business, that either buys the debt or is hired to collect a non-business debt, are monitored by the Act. The protections that the FDCPA offers are as follows: Who: They can only talk about your debt to you or your attorney. They cannot communicate the fact that you owe money to any other person. To this extent, the envelopes that their collection letters come in cannot imply that you owe money. They cannot try to collect money from you using a postcard. If they do contact neighbors or co-workers, their inquiry is limited only to asking for your contact information (address and phone number). What (Off-Limits Tactics): Debt collectors are prohibited by the FDCPA from threatening you with violence, harm, arrest or even a lawsuit if they do not really intend to sue you. Debt collectors cannot lie to you. Some have illegally implied that they are government agents, that you have committed a crime or that they

work for a credit bureau. In most abuse cases, the creditor has misrepresented the amount that is actually owed. It is also illegal for them to give false information about you to a credit reporting agency, to send you anything that looks like an official or court document (when it is not), or for them to cash a post-dated check earlier than the stated date thereon. When: A debt collector may only contact you between 8 a.m. and 9 p.m. daily, unless you agree otherwise. These companies cannot make repeated annoying phone calls to you either. There was one instance reported in the “Washington Post,” where a bill collector called six times within 15 minutes in an effort to collect from a person’s daughter, who had not lived at that house in over a decade. Where: Debt collectors may call you at work. However, if you tell them that they cannot or should not do so, they are restricted from further contacting you there. How: You can stop their contact of you completely by writing them a letter and telling them to discontinue any further contact with you. Beware: Such a request may stop their letters and constant calling, but it does not stop them from reporting the debt to

a credit reporting agency, and it does not stop their ability to sue you. Also, within five days of your first contact by a debt collector, the collector must send you a written notice telling you the amount you owe, the name of the original creditor, and what action to take if you don’t think you owe the debt. You can insist that the debt collector send you verification of your debt. If you do, the debt collector cannot make any further collection efforts until he has given you the validation of your debt. The validation can be a credit contract, a receipt for credit purchases, a hospital bill, a payment agreement, or anything else that created the base debt that they are trying to collect. If a debt collector crosses the line drawn by the law, you can report him to the Federal Trade Commission at www.ftc.gov. You may also file a federal lawsuit against the debt collector. They may be liable to you for up to $1,000 per violation. The fact that you may (or may not, in some cases) owe money does not give license to be treated horribly and illegally by unscrupulous bill collectors. Knowing your rights can help put an end to debt collector’s abusive tactics.

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Oct. 7, 2005

The Morning Calm Weekly

Dukes of Hazzard PG-13 Must Love Dogs PG-13 Must Love Dogs PG-13 Just Like Heaven PG-13 Must Love Dogs PG-13 Transporter 2
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The Great Raid R Just Like Heaven PG-13 Must Love Dogs PG-13 Wedding Crashers R Must Love Dogs PG-13 Transporter 2
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The Great Raid R Just Like Heaven PG-13 Must Love Dogs PG-13 Hustle & Flow R Dukes of Hazzard PG-13 Dukes of Hazzard PG-13

Dukes of Hazzard PG-13 Dukes of Hazzard PG-13 The Great Raid R No Show The Great Raid R No Show

Supercross
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Supercross
PG-13

The Island
PG-13

No Show The Great Raid R No Show The Great Raid R No Show

No Show Dukes of Hazzard PG-13 No Show War of the Worlds PG-13 No Show

No Show Dukes of Hazzard PG-13 No Show Supercross
PG-13

Supercross
PG-13

Must Love Dogs Sarah, a divorced preschool teacher who has sworn off dating after her bad breakup, finds her family pushing her back into the dating world. Her sister places a personal ad for her, declaring that anyone answering it “must love dogs,” despite the fact that Sarah doesn’t own a dog herself. When someone intriguing responds to the ad, she decides to borrow Mother Theresa, her brother’s dog, and plunge in.

F l i g h t p l a n Flying at 40,000 feet in a cavernous, state-of-the-art E474 aircraft, Kyle faces every mother’s worst nightmare when her six-year-old daughter Julia vanishes without a trace mid-flight from Berlin to New York. Already emotionally devastated by the unexpected death of her husband, Kyle desperately struggles to prove her sanity to the disbelieving flight crew and passengers while facing the very real possibility that she may be losing her mind.

S u p e r c r o s s Two brothers overcome emotional and physical obstacles to achieve success in the competitive world of Supercross racing. The brothers’ conflicts are magnified by their different life choices and their decision to become competitors and rivals. KC is a more cautious rider than his younger brother Trip, who has more natural talent but takes too many risks. When KC gets an allexpenses paid corporate sponsored ride, a rift forms between the two brothers.

Sky High -- When you’re the son of the world’s most legendary superheroes The Commander and Jetstream, there is only one school for you - Sky High, an elite high school that is entrusted with the responsibility of molding today’s power-gifted students into tomorrow’s superheroes. The problem is that Will is starting with no superpowers of his own and, worst of all, instead of joining the ranks of the “Hero” class, he finds himself relegated to being a “Sidekick.” Now he must somehow survive his freshman year while dealing with usual -- and super -problems that accompany teenage life.

The Great Raid Set in the Philippines in 1945, “The Great Raid” tells the true story of the 6th Ranger Battalion, under the command of Lt. Col. Henry Mucci who undertakes a daring rescue mission against all odds. Traveling thirty miles behind enemy lines, the 6th Ranger Battalion aims to liberate over 500 American prisoners-ofwar from the notorious Cabanatuan Japanese POW camp in the most audacious rescue ever.

Just Like Heaven A San Franciscan man falls in love with a female spirit he encounters in his home. The dilemma is that the woman whose ghost he’s swooning over has been in a coma for months, and, unless he does something, she’ll be taken off life support.

Dark Water
PG-13

The Devil’s Rejects R Flightplan
PG-13

Dark Water
PG-13

Fantastic Four
PG-13

No Show
Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo
PG-13

No Show Supercross
PG-13

No Show Supercross
PG-13

Flightplan
PG-13

Flightplan
PG-13

Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo
PG-13

Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo
PG-13

The Great Raid R The Great Raid R Flightplan
PG-13

The Great Raid R The Great Raid R Flightplan
PG-13

Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo
PG-13

Dukes of Hazzard
PG-13

No Show Flightplan
PG-13

Flightplan
PG-13

Dukes of Hazzard PG-13 Flightplan
PG-13

Supercross
PG-13

No Show The Great Raid R Supercross
PG-13

Supercross
PG-13

Supercross
PG-13

The Great Raid R Supercross
PG-13

Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo
PG-13

Flightplan
PG-13

Sky High
PG

Sky High
PG

Sky High
PG

Supercross
PG-13

Must Love Dogs PG-13

Must Love Dogs
PG-13

The Adventures of Sharkboy and Lavagirl PG-13

The Adventures of Sharkboy and Lavagirl PG-13

Fantastic Four
PG-13

Fantastic Four
PG-13

Fantastic Four
PG-13

The Morning Calm Weekly

http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly

Oct. 7, 2005

Learning to place our trust in the Lord
By Chaplain (Maj.) Lee Rodgers
2nd Infantry Division

15

What is your philosophy on trust? Mine has been primarily influenced by my father and my first battalion commander. My father was not a very trusting soul. My first battalion commander said that he trusted everyone until they proved otherwise. My father lived through the Great Depression and World War II. I trust people most of the time. What is your trust in? One of Israel’s most beloved kings was King David. God said David was a man after his own heart. David had many challenges in his life, but he knew where to put his trust. One of David’s Psalms, Psalms 62:8 says, “Trust in Him at all times…” David’s trust was in

the Lord. He trusted God many times when there was no evidence of victory. In my life, I was blessed with one of the best fathers in the world. Tragedy struck our family, though, when I was 15 years of age. My father became deathly ill with a rare form of brain meningitis. He lost most of his moment-by-moment memory, but he could easily remember things 10 years in the past. I loved and revered my father. My trust was mostly in my dad. In just a few short days, my world was radically changed for life. What was a teenager like me supposed to do? Since we attended worship services some in a small Texas town, all I could think of was to call out to God. I believe God heard me that day in that feeble

teenage prayer with poor theology. I found that I could personally trust in the Lord. He heard my prayer. He spared my Dad’s life and let me know him for 25 more good years. Now, where is your trust? Is it in your friends? Friends are wonderful to have in life. Friends are great in times of trouble, too. Friends, though, are not quite enough for our hearts; wouldn’t you agree? Friends fail us. We fail friends. David the great king was a mighty warrior the Bible says, because he trusted in the Lord. David was a manly man, but he was a poet and a musician also. David had trials in his life, but he found a way to trust his way out of trials. He sang praise to God as a way of life. David said, “Trust in Him at all times.” Isn’t that good advice for us Warriors today as well?

Area I Worship Services
Catholic Mass Saturday 6 p.m. Sunday 9 a.m. Noon Eucharistic Episcopal Sunday 5:30 p.m. Latter Day Saints Sunday 1 p.m. Protestant Sunday 9:30 a.m. 10 a.m. 10:30 a.m. 11 a.m. Camp Stanley Chapel CRC Warrior Chapel Camp Casey Stone Chapel Stanley Chapel Crusader Chapel Camp Castle Chapel Camp Casey Stone Chapel Camp Kyle Chapel Camp Casey DISCOM Chapel, Camp Hovey Chapel Theater, Stanley Chapel, Camp Casey Crusader Chapel Protestant (COGIC) Sunday 12:30 p.m. Protestant Contemporary Sunday 6 p.m. Protestant Gospel Sunday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Korean Services Sunday 9 a.m. 7 p.m. CRC Warrior Chapel Camp Stanley (Reggie’s) CRC Warrior Chapel Camp Stanley Chapel Camp Casey DISCOM Chapel Camp Stanley Chapel, 1st Sunday 1 p.m.
2nd/3rd Sun. 2 p.m.

Tuesday

7 p.m. 6:30 p.m. Wednesday 6 p.m.

CRC Warrior Chapel Camp Jackson Chapel Camp Jackson Chapel Camp Casey Stone Chapel Camp Castle Chapel Camp Hovey Chapel

Area I Chaplains
Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Mike Belue [email protected] 732-7998 Chaplain (Maj.) Mark Awdykowyz [email protected] 732-6169 Chaplain (Maj.) Lee Rodgers [email protected] 723-7144

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16 http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly

Oct. 7, 2005

Hanbok - A Korean tradition
By Park Myung-joon
19th Theater Support Command Public Affairs

The Morning Calm Weekly

A model displays a modern, fusion-style hanbok during a fashion show for guests at the AsianPacific Economic Cooperation Women Leaders’ Network Aug. 25 at the InterBurgo Hotel in Daegu. The fashion show highlighted hanbok designs from many different periods in Korean history. Women from all over the Asian-Pacific region attended this event, which was held in conjunction with the 2005 Small and Medium Enterprises Ministers’ Meetings.

PHOTOS

BY

PARK MYUNG-JOON

CAMP HENRY – Language, religion and cultural traditions such as dance, food, housing and fashion play an important role in the preservation and expression of cultural identity. In multiethnic nations such as China and the United States, styles of traditional fashions are diverse. But in Korea, a country with only one ethnicity, there is only one traditional style of fashion – hanbok. The hanbok style first appeared about 2,000 years ago. From that time, the basic shape and appearance of hanbok have changed very little. The basis of the hanbok design differs from Western clothing. The hanbok is based on flat and straight lines, as opposed to Western clothing, which is based on dimensional and curved lines. “This gave (the) hanbok unique pros and cons,” said a master hanbok maker Kim Bok-yeon. Having the base in straight lines gives hanboks a unique beauty when compared with Western clothing, said Kim. One way to truly appreciate hanbok is to see the lines of the skirt moving when the wind blows, she said. Because hanbok is not form-fitting to the body, the straight-line design offers enough space to allow the wearer to feel comfortable. “When I wore (a) hanbok, it was actually very comfortable, and I could move around. It was made out of some type of silk material, which felt good against my skin. It was a good experience to wear,” said Pvt. Joseph C. Schablik, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 19th Theater Support Command.

Age, gender, occasion and occupation call for different kinds of hanbok. Therefore, hanbok’s form, materials and designs provide a glimpse into the Korean lifestyle, while its colors indicate the values and worldview of the Korean people. “For the bureaucratic people, white cloth was a way to show their privilege and their nobility. Only using white fabric made them restrict their movements and speech to what was proper,” said Kim. Hanbok was also a way of hiding one’s appearance and forcing others to look for inner beauty. This illustrates the Korean way of determining people’s value, not by appearance but inner mind, which comes from the Confusionist culture. “Hanbok might mask the beauty that can be seen by outward appearances, but that helps showcase your inner beauty to others. That’s the big difference with Western clothes—not showing outer beauty. The emphasis on inner beauty should be the attractive point of hanbok,” said Kim. Most of the process of hanbok is still done by hand. Spc. Joanne Pae, 109th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, had a chance to visit Kim’s hanbok design house and see the actual process. “I really enjoyed the hand stitching that she had done, and you don’t find anything like that back in the United States. It looks machine made. The dress that she showed us was one of the most beautiful dresses that I had ever seen. It was gorgeous,” Pae said. “Wearing hanbok is just like wearing Korean tradition on your skin,” Kim said. “Trying it on is one way to know and experience the Korean Culture.”

Young models display traditional Hanboks for children during a fashion show Aug. 25 at the InterBurgo Hotel in Daegu.

The traditional queen’s hanbok shows off the intracate design found in many of these traditional garments.

18 http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly Smokin’

Oct. 7, 2005

The Morning Calm Weekly

Supergr group Latin Supergr oup entertains military throughout Pacific throughout Pacific Rim
By Korea Region MWR YONGSAN GARRISON – Las 3 Divas, a Latin group bringing together the seasoned musical talents of Shelly Lares, Elida Reyna and Stefani Montiel, kick off their first self-titled Tejas Records release by bringing their live show to U.S. troops stationed overseas at military bases in Guam, Korea, Okinawa and Japan Sept. 30 through Oct. 16. Hosted by Armed Forces Entertainment, Gibson Guitars, & Morale, Welfare and Recreation, Las 3 Divas bring a much-desired genre of entertainment to military personnel. “Our troops stationed overseas have been asking for entertainment like the Las 3 Divas for a long time,” said Rose Burrus, acting chief of Armed Forces Entertainment. “It’s a piece of American culture that we bring to service personnel, and we are thrilled to have the opportunity to partner with Gibson Guitars to bring them first-class Latin entertainment.” Often referred to as Latin’s sexiest and most-talented vocalists, each diva has won a Female Entertainer of the Year award during her extensive career. In addition, Lares and Reyna made history in 2003 by becoming the first females to win the Tejano Music Award for Vocal Duo of the Year, with their smash hit “Amiga.” As part of the partnership, Las 3 Divas will be giving away a DR-200 Acoustic Collection Epiphone Guitar at each of their performances. “These ladies combined their Latin influence and their talents singing and playing hip hop, tejano, country, and romantica — to bring more people original Latin music,” said Robert Trevino, director of Latin relations with Gibson Guitars. “The music is upbeat and fun,” said Burrus. “And that is what Armed Forces Entertainment is about — providing a well-deserved break for our military personnel serving overseas.” Las 3 Divas began their whirlwind Armed Forces Entertainment tour Sept. 27 and will return home Oct. 17. The group will travel with an 11-piece ensemble. The 21-day tour through the Pacific Rim will include five performances in Korea: Yongsan Garrison (Saturday); Camp Walker’s Hilltop Club, (Saturday); Kunsan Air Base’s Loring Club (Sunday); Chinhae Naval Station’s Duffy’s, (Sunday) Camp Casey’s Warrior Club (Tuesday); Camp Humphries (Wednesday); and the Camp Red Cloud Gym (Thursday). Las 3 Divas will also visit several other remote locations during the trip. All performances are open to ID cardholders and are free of charge. For information, contact your local MWR Entertainment Office or 723-3749. (Editor’s Note: Melissa Welch, Armed Forces Entertainment contributed to this article.)

Stars of Tomorrow The “Stars of Tomorrow” will be Saturday at Camp Casey’s Warrior’s Club. The competition begins at 7 p.m. To participate, sign up at your local MWR Community Activity Center by close of business today. Competing categories are vocal solo, vocal group, instrumental solo, instrumental group, specialty act solo and specialty act group. Winners will advance to KORO level competition. For information, call 732-6819. CRC Golf Club Championship The Camp Red Cloud Golf Club championship will be held on Saturday thru Monday. Tournament A player briefing will be at 8 a.m. Saturday. To participate, register at CRC Golf Course Pro Shop before close of business Friday. Entry Fee is effective to all contestants. Awards will be given to three categories; championship, first flight and second flight. All awards will be in the form of gift certificates. For information, call 732-6843. Oktoberfest and Volksmarch The Camp Stanley Community Activity Center will host an Oktoberfest party and Volksmarch Monday. The 10-km walk/run Volksmarch will begin at 8 a.m. T-shirts will be given to the first 100 people to register, and prizes will be awarded to the first three runners to finish. The event will feature German food, beverages and music, raffle drawings, live performances from the 2nd Infantry Division Band, and a demonstration by the 2ID Tae Kwon Do Team. Area I Flag Football Championship The Warrior division company level flag football championship is set for Hovey softball field Wednesday thru Oct. 14. This event is open to teams from camps Casey and Red Cloud Garrison championships. The top two teams from this championship will advance to 2005 Eighth U.S. Army championship. 8th Army Wrestling Championship The Eighth U.S. Army Wrestling Championship will be held at Camp Casey’s Carey Fitness Center Oct. 15. Weigh-ins and medical exams are at 10 a.m. and competition begins 1:30 p.m. TMCW Submissions To submit an item for use in The Morning Calm Weekly’s Korea Region events, send it to [email protected] For information, call 738-3355.

U.S. Army Top Fuel driver Tony “The Sarge” Schumacher performs a burn-out prior to making a 320+ MPH run. Schumacher captured the Ameriquest Mortgage NHRA Nationals in Joliet Ill. Sunday and in the process widened his lead in the Top Fuel point standings. Schumacher, who hails from the Chicago area, won for the second time at his home track after disposing of Doug Herbert in the finals with a 4.535-second pass at 328.94 mph. Following his classleading sixth victory of the season, Schumacher now leads second-place Larry Dixon by 205 points in the chase for the 2005 NHRA POWERade Top Fuel world championship.

U.S. ARMY FILE PHOTO

Comedy ROKs returns
By Korea Region MWR YONGSAN GARRISON – Morale, Welfare and Recreation is bringing Comedy ROKs back to Korea. Dan Smith, Marty Belafsky and Traci Jayne will perform their stand-up comedy act on installations throughout Korea thru Oct. 26. Dan Smith started doing comedy while attending Northeastern University in Boston, Mass. After a short-lived career as a medical underwriter, he embarked full-time. In 1995, he won “The Funniest Comic in Boston” contest sponsored by HBO. Following, he moved to LA and earned appearances in “The Whipper”, “Talk Soup,” “Friday Night Videos,” and “Star Search” as well as written and produced for “Blind Date” and “EXtreme Dating.” He has completed 10 comedy tours for the US military. Marty Belafksy, known as the “tall, skinny guy” from MTV’s “The Lyricist Lounge,” brings his insane brand of physical comedy to the stage. Marty began stand-up comedy after his Brown University graduation. Rodney Dangerfield booked him as the opening act at MGM Grand in Las Vegas and he appeared in Dangerfield’s movies “Back by Midnight” and “The 4th Tenor.” He may be recognized as “Crutchy” from the Disney musical “Newsies,” as well as appearances on “American Sweethearts,” “Men in Black II” and “Evolution.” Tracie Jayne, from Winersville, Ohio, debuted at The Laff Stop in Houston in 2002. An ex-military mechanic, a selfdescribed “tough cookie.” Tracie drinks, smokes and tells you straight. She won’t whine about men or “girly stuff” so don’t expect it. Her home clubs are The Laff Stop and Improv’s. Comedy ROKs is presented by MWR. All performances are open to ID cardholders and free of charge. For information, contact your local MWR Entertainment Office or call 723-3749.

Showtimes
Friday, 8 p.m. Camp Hialeah’s Pusan Pub Thursday, 8 p.m., Camp Walker’s Hilltop Club Tuesday, 7 p.m., Camp Casey Warrior Club Wednesday, 7 p.m. Camp Hovey’s Triangle Club Thursday, 7 p.m. K-16 Lucky 7 Club Oct. 14, 7 p.m. Yongsan Main Post Club Oct. 15, 8 p.m. Camp Humphreys’ Tommy D’s Oct. 17, 7 p.m. Suwon AB’s Scudbusters Oct. 18, 7 p.m. Camp Stanley’s Reggie’s Oct. 19, 7 p.m. Camp Red Cloud’s Mitchell’s Oct. 20, 7 p.m. Camp Eagle, Eagle’s Nest

Oct. 7, 2005

Page 21

2005 Soldier Show returns four to Humphreys
By Roger Edwards
Area III Public Affairs

CAMP HUMPHREYS – Four members of the Humphreys family returned Sept. 29 to entertain a packed house in the 2005 Soldier Show. Spc. Abraham Hazbun, Sgt. Allison Carpenter, Staff Sgt. Kent Kramer and 1st Lt. Christina Fanitzi were among the 19 entertainers and technicians who filled the Humphreys Gym with song and dance for about 600 of their fellow Soldiers. The 90-minute program included songs ranging from the theme from “Carwash” and a comic rendition of Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody,” to rap, rhythm and blues, rock, country, gospel and patriotic music all presented under the collective title “Operation America Cares.” “The message of the show,” according to Director Victor Hurtado, “is that it doesn’t matter how tough we are, and it doesn’t matter how fit to fight we are, Soldiers are still human and longing for the familiar and America’s affection.” Carpenter is a member of Humphreys 527th Military Intelligence Battalion, who sings and dances during the production, and juggles and twirls batons. “The Soldier Show has been a great opportunity,” she said. “I’ve been singing and dancing since I was two years old and this has been a once-in-a-lifetime chance to see what the life of an entertainer on the road is like. But it’s almost over and I’m looking forward to getting back.” Carpenter will only be returning to Humphreys for a short time, just long enough to clear and move on to her next assignment. Fanitzi, who was a member of the 30th Military Intelligence Battalion, is no stranger to entertainment. Before auditioning for the Soldier Show, Fanitzi appeared on stage in “42nd Street,” “Bye Bye Birdie” and the Army’s “Stars of Tomorrow”

competition. “I’ve been dancing since I can’t remember when,” she said, “and was really happy to be able to take advantage of this opportunity to be in a touring production. But I’ll be happy to get back to the Army too. I’ve enjoyed the Army and have to take care of my obligations.” Fanitzi has already PCSed from Korea, and will be joining her new unit with the 1st Armored Division in Germany when the 2005 Soldier Show wraps in November. Kramer is a member of the 532nd Military Intelligence Battalion. He has

been singing since he was 11 years old, joined a contemporary Christian/ Southern Gospel Group, “Proclaim” at 17 and leads a band “Creative Revolution” that is currently working on signing a record deal. “I’ve been entertaining for 20 years,” he said, “and have really enjoyed being in the Soldier Show. But this is a tough unit. We don’t have roadies. When we get to a place we set up ourselves, do the show, and then do the tear down and pack out for the next show. We get to travel and see the world, but we don’t get a lot of time off on tour.”

Hazbun, a member of the 6th Cavalry Regiment, is the only member of the Soldier Show who is not an entertainer. “I got picked as the video technician for the tour,” he said. “I’ve always enjoyed computers and playing with technology. When they asked for submissions, I sent some video footage I’d shot and edited. “It wasn’t technically that great, but they liked what I had done and picked me and sent me to class to learn the software package I’m using now. It’s a lot of fun.”

PHOTOS

BY

ROGER EDWARDS

Staff Sgt. Kent Kramer, Sgt. Allison Carpenter, 1st Lt. Christina Fanitzi and Spc. Abraham Hazbun pose for an after show portrait Sept. 29. All are members of the Camp Humphreys family who auditioned for and were selected to participate in the 2005 Soldier Show

First Lt. Christina Fanitzi says she is really happy to be able to take advantage of this opportunity to be in the Soldier’s Show.

Staff Sgt. Kent Kramer (lead guitarist above) has been entertaining for 20 years and has his own band, which is currently working on signing a record deal.

First Lt. Heather Gross, a Blackhawk pilot who joined the Soldier’s Show from Fort Campbell, Ky., presents Camp Humphreys and Area III’s top NCO, Command Sgt. Maj. Robert Frace, a plaque bearing the cover of the 2005 Soldier’s Show Program and the names of the troop to commemorate the Camp Humphreys performance.

Oct. 7, 2005 22 http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly

Humphreys hosts Powerlifting Championship
Jewish Services High Holy Day are being held in the South Post Chapel at Yongsan, 6-8 p.m. Friday. Everyone is invited. Military members can stay for free at the Walker Center, Bldg. 7003 near the chapel. Those that do not have military IDs will be met at Gate 10 at 5:55 p.m. and escorted in. Those arriving by Subway should take Line 6 (brown) to Noksapyeong (629), go to Exit 4 and walk straight down to Gate 10. For information, call 724-3089. CFC 2005 The Combined Federal Campaign for 2005 (Oct. 17 through Dec. 15) will kick off with a ceremony at the Camp Humphreys Exchange at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday. There will be cake, a guest speaker and door prizes. Everyone is welcome to attend. For information, call 7538618. Red Cross CPR Class The America Red Cross has scheduled a Community CPR Class from 9 a.m. until 6 p.m. Oct. 15 . The class will teach techniques of adult, child and infant CPR and first aid. Cost is $35 and preregistration is required. For information, call 753-7172. Record Video Holiday Greetings A Hometown News Release crew will be at the CAC from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Oct. 14, to record Holiday Greetings to friends and family back home. Soldiers, civilian employees and family members who will be stationed overseas during Christmas and New Years may participate. Spouses and family members may record a greeting alone, if the Soldier is unvailable due to deployment or TDY. Soldiers must be in the uniform of the day, but may bring a brown T-shirt and BDU top to the taping. For information, call 753-8847. United Club Grants The United Club seeks to provide financial support to the Area III community through sales from the Painted Door Thrift Shop. Applications for cash grants will be accepted through Nov. 1. Organizations must request an application in writing at [email protected] or in person at the Painted Door Thrift Shop during regular business hours no later than Nov. 1. Grants are intended to be used to improve the quality of life for the Area III community. Cash grants will be awarded and disbursed by Nov. 15. Units and FRGs are not eligible. By Roger Edwards
Area III Public Affairs

Area III

The Morning Calm Weekly

CAMP HUMPHREYS – Humphreys Lifters walked away with seven of the 12 first and second place prizes in the 8th U.S. Army 2005 KORO Powerlifting Championship. The contest, which took place Saturday at the Humphreys Gym, was divided into six men’s weight c l a s s e s a n d t w o w o m e n ’s . Competitors performed three lifts each in the squat, bench and dead

lift categories, with the best lift in each category counted towards the final score. Unchallenged in the women’s 123 to 132 pound weight class was 1st Lt. Shawn Tillman of Camp Humphreys’ 532nd Military Intelligence Company, with a total of 400 pounds. Unchallenged in the women’s 132.1 to 148 pound weight class was Pfc. Destiny Manriquez of the 1st Air Defense Artillery, Kunsan Air Base, with 320 pounds. Men’s first place finishers are:

123 – 132 pound class 2nd Lt. Tejan Robinson Unchallenged 38th Field Artillery, Camp Casey 800 pounds 148 – 165 pound class Spc. Marvin Johnson 520th Maint. Co., Camp Humphreys 965 pounds 165.1 – 181 pound class Spc. Mario Carranza Unchallenged 249th MP Det., Camp Humphreys 800 pounds 181.1 – 198 pound class Spc. Robert Strickler Unchallenged 1st ADA, Kunsan AB 1,015 pounds 198.1 to 220 pound class Sgt. Jamy Johnson 249th MP Det., Camp Humphreys 1,330 pounds over 220.1 pound class 1st Sgt. Calvin Thompson 52nd Ord. Co., Camp Humphreys 1,680 pounds

First Sgt. Calvin Thompson, 52nd Ord., lifts his first weight of the 8th Army 2005 KORO Powerlifting Championship. The 550 pounds was enough to slightly bow the bar across his shoulders.

ROGER EDWARDS

MWR opens new Zoeckler Station recreational facility
By Roger Edwards
Area III Public Affairs

CAMP HUMPHREYS – Soldiers working and living in the Zoeckler Station area of Camp Humphreys now have a new place to play. MWR has opened a “MiniCAC,” a game room with table tennis, foosball, darts and a chinning bar; in building 1319 across the street from the Z-Station complex. The project was initiated when Capt. Rich Malaga focused attention on the fact that, with the Nightwatch closure for remodeling, his Soldiers had no ready access to on base relaxation facilities other than bowling and golf. “To get to anything else on base,” he said, “they had to take the bus. There were a lot who simply turned left and went to town instead.” His idea was to open a recreational room near where his Soldiers live and work. Humphreys MWR decided to do something about it. A room the Z-Station fitness annex that had been used for storage was cleared out and painted. DPW repaired the plumbing and a leaky roof. Carpeting was installed, prints from the on-going MWR digital photo contest were hung and recreational equipment moved in.

COURTESY PHOTO

Col. Michael Taliento (left) and James Howell (right) present keys to the new Z-Station Mini-CAC to Capts. Rich Malaga and Nicole Dorn. On Wednesday, Sept. 28, the new facility was opened and keys passed to Malaga, B Co., 532nd MI commander, and to Capt. Nicole Dorn, A Co., 527th MI commander. “I think this is a great idea,” said Spc. Tiffanie Aguinaga, 532nd MI, when she saw the facility. “I’d lots rather come here than take the bus all the way across post, and it’s just great for rainy days too.” Keys to the facility are available for check out at company orderly rooms.

BOSS slates October movie nights, next bungee trip
By Roger Edwards
Area III Public Affairs

CAMP HUMPHREYS – Better Opportunities for Single Soldiers has declared Friday nights in October “BOSS Movie Nights.” “We’re making use of the post theater after midnight,” said Humphreys BOSS President, Spc. Michelle Bruner, “and will run movies until 7 or everyone leaves.” BOSS held its first Movie Night Sept. 30, with a slate of horror films. “But we intend

to switch the programs,” said Bruner. “Tonight (Oct. 7) is comedy night,” she said. Other possible themes include Disney Classics, Adam Sandler Night and Star Wars Night. We’re looking for input on what the Soldiers would like to see.” Admission is free and BOSS is providing the popcorn. Sodas will be available at cost. For information or to make suggestions, call Bruner at 010-8680-7789. BOSS has also scheduled the last Bungee Jump trip of the year for Oct. 15. There are

22 places available on a first-come, firstserved bases. Cost for the trip is $55 and that includes transportation, lunch, snacks, one bungee jump and a ride on either the Extreme Sky Coaster (giant swing) or the Ejector Seat. Those interested in the trip must be signed up not later than close of business Oct. 14. The bus will leave Humphreys Community Activity Center at 7 a.m. Oct. 15 and will return at about 7 p.m.

Readiness Group ‘great Family Readiness Group Rally deemed ‘great success’
By Roger Edwards
Area III Public Affairs

The Morning Calm Weekly

Area III

http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly

Oct. 7, 2005

23

CAMP HUMPHREYS – Humphreys Army Community Services sponsored a Family Readiness Group Rally Saturday, Oct. 1. More than 150 people attended the three hour event designed to provide ready access to information Family Readiness Groups and individuals need in Korea. “Our goal was to provide a consolidated forum, a showcase of information for individuals and unit Family Readiness Groups in Area III, from the Area III support organizations that provide the services,” said Bonnie Elkins, Deployment, Mobilization and Family Readiness Coordinator for Area III Army Community Services. “An even larger part of Saturday’s program was the displays set up by unit FRGs. “Unit FRGs are the organizations that make it all work,” she said. “They’re there to step in and support individual families, to ease concerns associated with deployments, to help new spouses adjust to the military, to assist in resolving difficulties before they become real problems. I think the rally was a huge success.” The Rally featured informational displays from 22 different organizations ranging from the American Red Cross and Army Substance Abuse to finance and legal.

PHOTOS

BY

ROGER EDWARDS

(From left) Warrant Officer Celeste Melena, Capt. Winston Symmes and Warrant Officer Justin Roberts look over the display table manned by Ashley and Lt. Col. Gus Blum. Blum is commander of the 2nd Aviation Regiment, Camp Eagle. Unit FRGs that had displays at the rally including the Combat Aviation Brigade, 23rd Area Support Group, 194th Maintenance Battalion, 602nd Aviation Support Battalion, etc. Displays included information on how family members can pack lightly for evacuations, environmental protective gear for adults, children and infants, and the services available at all levels. “It wasn’t all business though,” said Elkins. “We had games and activities for the kids, a hoola-hoop contest for kids and adults, a puppet show for the kids, and door prizes and snacks and beverages.

Pfc. Kevin Huffhines (tiger) and Spc. Thomas Brett, both of the 501st Signal Company, work as puppeteers to entertain the children at the Family Readiness Group Rally Saturday.

Good Neighbor Project

Soldiers, Korean students enjoy sports day
By F. Neil Neeley
Area III Public Affairs

University student Kim Jun-young wrestles Spc. Joshua Parr, Combat Aviation Brigade, during a Korean-style wrestling match.

F. NEIL NEELEY

CAMP HUMPHREYS — Enthusiastic Korean students and Camp Humphreys Soldiers cheered for their own Sept. 28, during sports day competitions at Pyongtaek University. Events such as Korean wrestling and basketball were featured events. The sports day is part of a common values project between the university and Area III Soldiers. The project is run by the installation’s Community Relations Officer, Peter Yu. “I’m really impressed,” said freshman student Kim Seri. “The Koreans and Americans played well together

and even though there were some difficulties with language, everybody managed to communicate with signs and body language. When I watch them play together I feel really enthusiastic about our interaction.” Area III Soldiers were impressed with the quality of the university sportsmen. A squad of Korean students beat the Humphreys Soldiers 80 to 12 at basketball. “We thought it was going to be easy but it turned out to be a real basketball game,” said Spc. Jeffery Coleman, 46th Transportation Company. “We didn’t have any plays. They were running screens, back doors and all kinds of plays and we couldn’t stop them,”

Product boxtops worth 10 cents each in Boxtops for Education program
By Roger Edwards
Area III Public Affairs

three-day HAES slates three-day Scholastic Book Fair
By Roger Edwards
Area III Public Affairs

CAMP HUMPHREYS – Commissary and exchange customers who buy certain food items, now have the opportunity to make a contribution to Humphreys American Elementary School with no investment other than a little time. The HAES Parent-Teacher Organization is working the “Box Tops for Education” program sponsored by a number of companies that supply Americans with a large part of their weekly diet. Soldiers, civilians and family members who buy products ranging from Old El Paso to

Pop Secret popcorn can donate 10 cents per item simply by tearing off the boxtop and dropping it in the collection box during their next commissary visit. Some of the other companies participating in the program are General Mills, Pillsbury and Betty Crocker. “Ten cents doesn’t seem like much,” said Kelly Dupeire, Parent-Teacher Organization coordinator for the program, “but when you add all the 10cent coupons up over a school year, you can get some serious money. “Last year we bought the school new playground equipment with the proceeds from the program.”

CAMP HUMPHREYS – Humphreys American Elementary School, the Humphreys Parent-Teacher Organization and Scholastic Books are sponsoring a book fair from 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily, Wednesday thru Oct. 14 The fair will also be open 5 to 8 p.m. Thursday evening. “The fair is open to the entire Humphreys community,” said Laura Reid, PTO coordinator for the fair, “and I want to remind everyone that the holidays are approaching and books make great gifts.” The books available at the fair will range from those suitable for reading to the youngest child to those of interest to the adult reader.

“We’ll have cookbooks, histories and mysteries,” said Reid. “There will be everything from computer how-to books to coloring books, and a spectrum of miscellaneous items. There will be Harry Potter. There will be hardback and paperback. And there will be books put out for students by Scholastic Books – books rarely sold outside of a Scholastic Books Book Fair.” Reid emphasized that in addition to being a great resource for the community for books, the fair will also benefit the community in another way. “A portion of the sales generated at the book fair will go back to the school,” she said. “It just gives our teachers more resources to help educate our children.”

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Oct. 7, 2005

The Morning Calm Weekly

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Oct. 7, 2005

Page 25

AFTB training helps build stronger Army
By Galen Putnam
Area IV Public Affairs

CAMP HENRY – Soldiers learn about the Army, its customs and how it functions through extensive training and ongoing first-hand experience. Things are a bit different, however, for the family members, civilian employees and others who make up the “Army Family.” To help close that knowledge gap, the Army offers a training program to help community members better understand what the Army is all about, improve life skills, enhance professional growth, develop leadership skills and more. Devised at an Army Family Action Plan conference following Operation Desert Storm, Army Family Team Building is a three-phase training program designed to teach family members and others how to cope with Army life, to support the Soldier and to contribute to the Army’s overall success. “The goal is for participants to learn, grow their potential, then train others,” said Vicki Kingston, Area IV Support Activity AFTB/AFAP coordinator. “AFTB helps people learn to adjust to Army life and then develop additional skills that can benefit the individual, their family and the community.” An important assumption is that if spouses are equipped to handle the unique challenges of military life, Soldiers will be able to better concentrate on the mission. Although AFTB is geared toward family members, Kingston pointed out the training is available to all community members, including Soldiers – who receive promotion points for attending. Level I training covers Army basics such as the chain of command, acronyms, entitlements and similar topics. Level II training branches into more complex topics such as relationship building, effective leadership,

GALEN PUTNAM

Students study a scenario as part of a decision-making exercise during Army Family Team Building Level III training Sept. 23 at Camp Henry. conflict management, group dynamics and others. Level III training delves into more in-depth subjects like coaching, mentoring and advising, teambuilding, motivating others, problem-solving techniques, and more. Level III training was held at Camp Henry Sept. 22 – 23 with 10 participants. Camp Hialeah conducted Level I training Sept. 14 with 23 students taking part. “I didn’t know about AFTB until I got to Daegu. I took Phase I and met a lot of people and that gave me confidence so I decided to continue,” said Level III student Ok Yong West, an administrative support assistant with the Area IV Support Activity Directorate of Human Resources, whose husband is a military retiree. “I wish they had something like this 20 years ago. It would have made me much more effective as a family member and as a member of the community.” AFTB classes are offered throughout the year at

camps Henry, Hialeah and Carroll. The next class will be a Korean-Language Level I course at Camp Carroll Oct. 28. An AFTB Instructor Training Course will be held Nov. 30 – Dec. 1 at Camp Henry. Graduation for ITC students will be held in conjunction with a ceremony marking the 11th birthday of AFTB 11 a.m. Dec. 2, at the Evergreen Community Club. All students and instructors who participated in Levels I – III during the past year are invited to attend and to be recognized. “When the spouse is happy, the Soldier is happy. It is a reciprocating process,” said Level III participant Bethany Cerella, a painter and Army Community Service volunteer whose husband is on active duty. “I learned a lot about group management, conflict management and other, critical concepts I haven’t been exposed to as an artist.” In Area IV Level I and II classes are offered once or twice a quarter. Level III training is held twice each year. The Instructor Training Course is held once a year. Off-peninsula AFTB courses for advanced students include the Master Training Course, which is offered twice each year, and the Core Instructor Training Course that is offered every two years. “Jae Bowers, our AFTB coordinator, managed to get people from all walks of life, including active duty, to participate. That’s important because the participants learn not only from the presenters but from each other as well,” said Walter Brockmann, Camp Hialeah Army Community Service director. “The ‘coming together’ or ‘chip-in’ mentality is very much alive here at Camp Hialeah. AFTB very much enhances that mindset.” For information or to sign up for an AFTB course in Daegu or Camp Carroll, call Vicki Kingston at 768-7232. At Camp Hialeah, call Jae Bowers at 763-7271. Level I – III training is also available via the Internet. The AFTB Web site is: www.aftb.org.

Speedy Shopper
Kendra Ruiz, wife of Maj. Averill Ruiz, 20th Area Support Group, Camp Carroll, dashes through the Daegu Commissary Sept. 30 as a winner in the Stars and Stripes Read-N-Sweep Shopping Spree Sweepstakes. Ruiz was one of four contest winners Pacific-wide to be awarded a three-minute shopping spree. Her sprint through the commissary netted $288 worth of groceries. Feeling charitable, contest officials allowed Ruiz an extra two minutes of speed shopping in which she netted $180.70 in additional items, bringing her total to $468.70. Winners were selected from Korea, Guam, Mainland Japan and Okinawa.

Time to tape your Holiday Greetings
Area IV Public Affairs An Army and Air Force Hometown News Service video team will tape “Holiday Greetings” 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m. Friday at Camp Hialeah Army Community Service and 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Saturday at the Camp Walker Main Exchange. On-duty Soldiers must be in uniform. Off-duty Soldiers need not be in uniform but must have a brown Tshirt and BDU top to wear. The videos will be sent to television stations in the United States to air in December. For information, call the IV Support Activity Public Affairs Office at 768-7604.

Trick or treat on tap
Area IV Public Affairs Trick or treating will be 6 – 8 p.m. Oct. 31. Military Police will conduct a safety patrols from 5-8 p.m. The Camp Walker Wood Clinic and Camp Hialeah Dispensary Emergency room will provide candy X-ray service 7:30 - 9:30 p.m.

GALEN PUTNAM

26 http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly
NEO Exercise USFK will conduct noncombatant evacuation exercise COURAGEOUS CHANNEL 05-2 from Oct. 27 – 30. It is mandatory for all DoD affiliated noncombatants to participate. The goal is to have 100 percent of NEO packets reviewed for accuracy and completeness. Sponsors must ensure their NEO packets are reviewed by their unit NEO Warden by Oct. 20. For information, contact Ken Edland at 768-7737. Prayer Breakfast The Men of the Morning Calm Monthly Prayer Breakfast and Fellowship will be 7: 45 a.m. Saturday at the Camp Walker Chapel Activities Center. For information, call Don Howell at 764- 4590. 5K Fun Run Camp Carroll will host a 5-kilometer Fun Run 8 a.m. Saturday at the Camp Carroll Fitness Center. Registration will be 7:30 – 7:45 a.m. For information, call the Camp Carroll Fitness Center at 765- 8287. 4-H Community Fair Child and Youth Service is sponsoring the Middle School and Teen 4-H Community Fair 1 – 4 p.m. Saturday at Youth Center Gym on Camp Walker. For information, call Hong Sumi at 764-5721/5722. NEO Class A Noncombatant Evacuation Operations Preparedness Class will be held 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. Oct. 14 at Army Community Service, Bldg. 1103, Camp Henry. The class will include a NEO briefing, information on how to prepare a NEO kit, Sail Away/Fly Away information and more. For information, call Kiya Reed at 768-7610. Volunteer Luncheon All registered volunteers are invited to a recognition luncheon 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Oct. 21 at the Evergreen Community Club on Camp Walker. Tickets should be picked up at Army Community Service on Camp Henry by Oct. 14. For information, call Bonnie McCarthy at 768- 8126. Bank Closure The Camp Henry Community Bank will close at noon Oct. 19 for employee training. Regular hours will resume Oct. 20. For information, call Capt. Hubble at 768-7575. Triathlon Slated Camp Carroll Road Race Series Triathlon consisting of a 500-meter swim, 15-kilometer bike and 5kilometer run will be 8 a.m. Oct. 22 at Fitness Center. Registration will be 7:30 – 7:45 a.m. For information, contact Camp Carroll Fitness Center at 765- 8287.

Oct. 7, 2005

Andong Maskdance Festival

Area IV

The Morning Calm Weekly

An unlimited variety of masks can be found at the Andong Maskdance Festival.

A boy maneuvers his handmade kite as a multitude of others compete for airspace

Members of a dance troupe representing Venezuela perform at the Andong Maskdance Festival Sunday in Andong City. The festival, marking its 35th year, features an array of traditional Korean crafts and dances, as well as international performances. The festival site offers several stages to enjoy performances ranging from mime to magic to mask dances.Visitors can also paint their own masks, create traditional kites or partake in many other hands-on activities. The Andong Maskdance Festival runs through Sunday. Andong City is about 70 miles northeast of Daegu. For information about the festival, go to www.maskdance.com.

PHOTOS

BY

GALEN PUTNAM

Eat My Dust

Junior Sidney Washington turns the corner on the Osan American School Cougar defense during Taegu American School’s home football opener at Camp Walker’s Kelly Field Saturday. Despite an inspired team effort and several sparkling individual performances, the Warriors fell to Osan 27-23 in the tightly contested game.

GALEN PUTNAM

The Morning Calm Weekly

Wide variety of events planned for Fire Prevention Week
Area IV Public Affairs CAMP HENRY – The Area IV Fire Department has scheduled a series of events marking National Fire Prevention Week Sunday through Oct. 15 to educate school children and remind residents about the importance of fire safety and fire prevention. The National Fire Protection Association has designated a week in October as National Fire Prevention Week annually since 1922 in remembrance of the Great Chicago Fire that started Oct. 8, 1871. The conflagration claimed 250 lives and destroyed 17,430 buildings. Fire stations in the United States and around the world observe the week by emphasizing and reinforcing the importance of fire safety with a variety of educational activities. This year’s theme is “Use candles with care” according to Joseph W. Thompson, Area IV fire chief. Area IV Fire Prevention Week activities include: Camp Hialeah Tuesday, Fire truck tour and firefighting demonstration for students and staff, Pusan American School, 2 – 2:30 p.m. Wednesday, Joint U.S. and ROK fire truck parade through Camp Hialeah, 10 a.m. Wednesday, Open House at the Camp

Area IV

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27

Hialeah Fire Station, 10 a.m. – noon. Camp Carroll Monday, Fire prevention class demonstrating use of various types of fire extinguishers for Heavy Equipment Division, Material Support Center – Korea, 9 a.m. Monday, Fire drill and fire inspection for dining facility, 10 a.m. Monday, Fire prevention class for 6th Ordnance Battalion and 293rd Signal Company, 2 p.m. Monday, Fire drill and fire inspection for Community Activity Center personnel, 3 p.m. Tuesday, Fire safety training for facility managers and unit fire marshals, 10 a.m., Camp Carroll Digital Training Facility. Tuesday, Fire prevention class for

307th Signal Battalion, 2 p.m. Tuesday, Fire drill and fire inspection for Post Exchange personnel, 3 p.m. Wednesday, Fire prevention class for Storage Division, Material Support Center – Korea, 9 a.m. Wednesday, Fire drill and inspection for Dispensary personnel, 10 a.m. Wednesday, Fire drill and inspection for Commissary personnel, 2 p.m. Wednesday, Fire drill and fire inspection for Class VI store personnel, 3 p.m. Thursday, Open House at the Camp Carroll Fire Station, 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Thursday, Fire-fighting and rescue demonstrations for students and Waegwan community, 11 a.m., ChungAng Elementary School Thursday, Fire prevention class for

Army Community Service family members, 2 p.m. Thursday, Fire drill and fire extinguisher demonstrations for Korean Post Exchange personnel, 3 p.m. Oct. 14, Fire truck parade, 9:30 a.m. Oct. 14, Fire drill at Camp Carroll Headquarters, Camp Carroll and Waegwan City Fire Departments will respond to the drill and demonstrate the use of fire equipment, 10 a.m. Oct. 14, Fire-fighting demonstration featuring Camp Carroll, Waegwan City and Chilgok County Fire Departments, Area “D,” 11 a.m. Oct. 14, Fire prevention class for 16th Medical Logistics Battalion, 2 p.m. Oct. 14, Fire drill and fire extinguisher demonstrations for Child Development Center, 3 p.m. Oct. 14, Fire truck parade, 10 a.m. Daegu Enclave (Camps Henry, George and Walker) Sunday, Fire prevention display at Camp Walker Main Post Exchange, 9 – 11 a.m. Sunday, Fire Prevention display at Camp Henry Mini Mall, 9 – 11 a.m. Sunday, Distribute fire prevention booklets at various locations on camps Walker and Henry, 1– 3 p.m. Monday, Replace smoke detector batteries and inspect fire extinguishers

See Fire Page 28 Fire,

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28 http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly Rompin’ At The Rally

Oct. 7, 2005

Area IV

The Morning Calm Weekly

Fire

from Page 27

GALEN PUTNAM

Kids go bonkers inside the inflatable bouncer at the Camp Walker Family Readiness Group Rally Saturday. The rally, part of the annual peninsula-wide Family Readiness Group Rally, featured games and activities including flower arranging, a chili cook-off and more. The big crowd also had the chance to peruse the Taegu Spouses Association annual Fall Bazaar and take in Taegu American School’s football home opener, both also held at the Kelly Fitness Center complex.

Wednesday, Fire Station Open House, Hosting children’s group, 10 a.m. – 3 p.m., Camp Walker Thursday, Replace smoke detector batteries and inspect fire extinguishers at Camp Walker Family Housing and inspect fire extinguishers, 9 – 11:30 a.m. Thursday, Replace smoke detector batteries and inspect fire extinguishers at Camp George apartments and inspect fire extinguishers, 9 – 11:45 a.m. Thursday, Lecture and fire extinguisher demonstration for Camp Henry Snack Bars, 10 – 11 a.m. Thursday, Replace smoke detector batteries and inspect fire extinguishers at Camp Walker Family Housing, 1:30 – 3:15 p.m. Thursday, Lecture and fire extinguisher demonstration for Camp Walker Evergreen Club, Burger King and Dining Facility, 1:30 – 4:30 p.m. Oct. 14, Replace smoke detector batteries and inspect fire extinguishers at Camp Walker Family Housing, 9 – 10:30 a.m. Oct. 14, Replace smoke detector batteries and inspect fire extinguishers at Camp George Family Housing, 9 – 11:45 a.m. Oct. 14, Replace smoke detector batteries and inspect fire extinguishers at Camp Walker Family Housing Oct. 14, Conduct special fire prevention inspection for battery type smoke detectors in barracks, 1:30 – 2:45 p.m. Oct. 14, Special fire prevention inspection and replace smoke detector batteries at Camp Henry, 1:30 – 4:30 p.m.

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Oct. 7, 2005

Korean Language

The Morning Calm Weekly

Learn Korean Easily

Minsook Kwon
Language Instructor

Word of the week

‘shee-jahk’
The phrase of the week

started.” “ The meeting has started. ”

.
Hweh-ui shee-jahk-dweh-seum-nee-dah.
The meeting has started

Conversation of the week
Nue-joe-soe jweh-song-hahm-nee-dah.

Gwehn-chahn-suem-nee-dah.

Jahm-ggahn-mahn-yo.

Weh-yo?

Soe-ryou doo-go wah-soe-yo.

Dah-nyoe-oh-sheep-see-oh.

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