The Weekender 04-25-2012

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CABINET COMES ALIVE,
P. 28
ELECTRIC CITYTATTOO
CONVENTION HAS
SCRANTON ABUZZ, P. 52
VOL.19 ISSUE 24 APR 25-MAY 1, 2012 • THEWEEKENDER.COM
weekender
NEPA’S No. 1 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT FREE WEEKLY
Your Readers’ Choice winners
come into the spotlight
CALLING
ALL
WINNERS
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Letter from the editor
social
Jennie Garth
Online comment
of the week.
Someone just told me I’m
trending #2 on yahoo. #1 is a
pregnant man... One thing...
What does trending mean?? It
sounds dangerous!!
The Weekender has 9,499
Facebook fans. Find us now at
Facebook.com/theweekender
I
’m pretty excited about
this issue, and not only
because it means that the
massive undertaking that is
our Readers’ Choice poll is
over. This annual issue is
actually among my favorites
because I know for a fact
it’s an issue that you, our
readers, care a lot about.
How do I know that for
certain?
Because I’ve fielded tons
of calls and e-mails the past
few weeks from readers ask-
ing if we knew who won,
when they could expect to
learn the winners and there
were even a few that prom-
ised me “they wouldn’t tell”
if I let the cat out of the
bag early, so I’m happy to
tell those eager beavers that
their wait is over.
The list of winners begins
on p. 35, and there is
definitely a good mix
of some incumbents
and newbies this year.
Come help us cele-
brate both at Breakers
inside Mohegan Sun
at Pocono Downs
Wednesday, April 25
at 8 p.m. It’s always a
good time, and the
night is just as much
about you readers as
it is the winners be-
cause they wouldn’t
be there without the
thousands that voted
on www.theweekender.com.
We hope to see you there!
In addition to Readers’
Choice, we also covered a
plethora of other upcoming
happenings, well, happening
in NEPA in this issue. For
starters, The Badlees return
with its first-ever greatest-
hits CD (p. 21) while Cabi-
net dropped its third live
outing, “Eleven,” this week
(p. 28). Pete Croatto wasn’t
“The Lucky One” with his
movie review (p. 31), and
we dropped some ink — get
it? — on the Electric City
Tattoo Convention (p. 52).
Well, I’m just about out
of space, so how about you
start turning pages? As al-
ways, thanks for reading!
-- Nikki M. Mascali
Weekender Editor
staff
Contributors
Ralphie Aversa, Justin Brown, Marie Burrell, Caeriel Crestin, Pete Croatto, Dale Culp, Janelle Engle, Tim Hlivia, Michael Irwin,
Amy Longsdorf, Jayne Moore, Mystery Mouth, Kacy Muir, Ryan O’Malley, Jason Riedmiller, Jeff & Amanda from 98.5 KRZ,
Jim Rising, Lisa Schaeffer, Alan Sculley, Chuck Shepherd, Alan K. Stout, Mike Sullivan, Bill Thomas, Noelle Vetrosky
Interns
Nicole Orlando, Amanda Riemensnyder, Amy Zurko
Address 90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703
Fax 570.831.7375
E-mail [email protected]
Online theweekender.com • myspace.com/weekender93 • facebook.com/theweekender • follow us on Twitter: @wkdr
Circulation
The weekender is available at more than 1,000 locations throughout Northeastern Pennsylvania.
For distribution problems call 570.829.5000 • To suggest a new location call 570.831.7398 • To place a classified ad call 570.829.7130
Editorial policy
the weekender is published weekly from offices at 90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703.
The opinions of independent contributors of the weekender do not necessarily reflect those of the editor or staff.
Rating system
WWWWW = superb WWWW = excellent WWW = good WW = average W = listenable/watchable
Rachel A. Pugh
General manager • 570.831.7398
[email protected]
Steve Husted
Creative director • 570.970.7401
[email protected]
John Popko
Sr. account executive • 570.831.7349
[email protected]
Mike Golubiewski
Production editor • 570.829.7209
[email protected]
Stephanie DeBalko
Staff Writer • 570.829.7132
[email protected]
Nikki M. Mascali
Editor • 570.831.7322
[email protected]
Tell
@wkdr your
favorite
reality show
“‘Lockup: Raw.’”
“Dance Moms.” “I enjoyed ‘The Real World’
when I was in college.”
Kieran Inglis
Account executive • 570.831.7321
[email protected]
Shelby Kremski
Account executive • 570.829.7204
[email protected]
“‘Survivorman.’”
“I hate to admit this, but if the
Kardashians are involved, I’m
probably going to watch it.”
“My idea of a reality show is ‘The
Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet,’
but I do watch ‘Dancing With The
Stars’ on occasion.”
“‘The Real Housewives of New
Jersey.’ I also love ‘Big Rich
Texas.’ Don’t judge me.”
“‘Iron Chef America.’”
What’s your favorite reality show?
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21 PICTURE PERFECT
The Badlees release ‘See Me As a Picture, the Best of So Far.’
49 TASTE THE RAINBOW
Rainbow Alliance dinner gala celebrates allies.
59 JUST FOR THE HEALTH OF IT
Dress for after weight-loss success.
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THANKS FOR VOTING
JOHN HOLENA READER’S CHOICE
FIRST RUNNER-UP BEST PIERCER!
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COVER STORY
35-36, 38-39
LISTINGS
THIS JUST IN ... 9
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT ... 22
CONCERTS ... 24-25
THEATER … 43
SPEAK & SEE ... 55
AGENDA ... 58, 61, 63, 65-66, 68-70
MUSIC
ALBUM REVIEWS ... 20
CHARTS ... 20
THE BADLEES … 21
CABINET … 28
STAGE & SCREEN
MOVIE REVIEW… 31
NOVEL APPROACH … 40
“MEETING OF THE ART WATERS” …
44
RAINBOWAWARDS … 49
STARSTRUCK … 57
THE RALPHIE REPORT … 57
FOOD, FUN &
FASHION
NEWS OF THE WEIRD ... 12
BUT THEN AGAIN …18
DISH … 48
STYLE FILES … 50
PUZZLE … 58
BITCH & BRAG … 59
JUST FOR THE HEALTH OF IT … 59
WHO IS … 62
MISC.
ELECTRIC CITY TATTOO CONVEN-
TION … 52
SORRY MOM & DAD … 52
TECH TALK … 61
SIGN LANGUAGE … 71
MOTORHEAD … 72
SHOWUS SOME SKIN … 72
MAN OF THE WEEK … 85
MODEL OF THE WEEK … 86
ON THE COVER
DESIGN BY ... STEVE HUSTED
PHOTO BY … AMANDA DITTMAR
VOLUME 19 • ISSUE 24
index
April 25-May 1, 2012
this just in
By Weekender Staff
[email protected]
GET SAUCED
SLP Concerts will present G.
Love & Special Sauce Tuesday,
June 26 at 8:30 p.m. at Three
Kings (603 Route 6, Jermyn).
The Philadelphia-based al-
ternative hip-hop trio — G. Love
on guitar/vocals/harmonica, Jeff
Clemens (drums) and Jim Pres-
cott (upright bass) — formed in
1993. Last year, G. Love released
a solo effort, “Fixin’ To Die,”
which was a collaboration with
The Avett Brothers.
Tickets go on sale Friday, April
27 at 10 a.m. via Ticketmaster
or the venue box office and are
$20 in advance or $22 the day of
the show. For more info, visit
SLPconcerts.net.
ARRIVE ALIVE
McCann School of Business
and Technology (264 Highland
Park Blvd., Wilkes-Barre Twp.)
will host The Arrive Alive Tour
from UNITE Wednesday, April
25 at 10 a.m.
The anti-drinking and texting
driving-education program,
which is open to high school
students and the public, will also
include demonstrations from
township police and food and
beverages from Abe Hobson and
Nationwide Insurance.
For more info, visit mccann.e-
du or call 570.622.7622.
LOCAL NEWSIES
The Society for Collegiate
Journalists recently announced
winners of its major awards, and
Marywood University in Scran-
ton was recognized in several
categories.
The Wood Word, Marywood’s
student-run newspaper, placed
first in Companion Newspaper
Website Overall Excellence.
According to a press release from
the school, Megan McGraw,
’12, was instrumental in getting
the paper’s new site off the
ground this year. Jeremy Barket,
’12, was also recognized with a
third place award in Feature
Page Design, as was Shane
Ostroski, ’12, who landed a
second-place award for Sports
Feature.
For more information, contact
Juneann Greco, public relations
director, at 570.340.6004 or
e-mail [email protected]
A WALK FOR AWARENESS
The Victims Resource Cen-
ter, in cooperation with Wilkes
University and King’s College,
will sponsor its annual Take
Back the Night march and rally
Wednesday, April 25 starting at
5:30 p.m.
Participants will gather at the
Wilkes student center and the
King’s campus center, walk to
Public Square where they will
join and proceed to the VRC at
the Kirby Health Center (71 N.
Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre).
The march and rally is being
held in observance of National
Crime Victims Rights Week,
and this year’s theme is “Extend-
ing the Vision … Reaching Ev-
ery Victim.’ The purpose of the
event is to raise awareness of
violence in the community, the
rights of victims of violence and
services available to help those
affected by violence. The public
is welcome; following the rally,
refreshments will be served.
In connection with the Take
Back the Night rally, information
tables and displays from VRC
will be on hand in the Sheehy-
Farmer Campus Center at
King’s and Wilkes’ Henry Stu-
dent Center from11a.m.-4 p.m.
A GOOD RUN
The 3rd Annual American
Red Cross Run for the Red 5k
Run/Walk held Saturday, March
31 at the NEPA Region Blood
Center (29 New Commerce
Blvd., Ashley) raised more than
$8,000 for the struggling Blood
Services Program and featured
more than 200 participants.
The American Red Cross is
one of the largest single suppliers
of blood and blood products in
the U.S., collecting and proc-
essing more than 40 percent of
the blood supply and distributing
it to some 3,000 hospitals and
transfusion centers nationwide.
On average one out of every
three people will need donated
blood in their lifetime.
For more information, contact
Phoretta Hoover at 570.823.7161
ext. 340 or Phoretta.Hoov-
[email protected] W
G. Love will bring his Special Sauce to NEPA in June.
Participants at last
year’s Take Back the
Night event.
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news of the weird
By Chuck Shepherd
Weekender Wire Services
YOU SNOOZE, YOU LOSE
In April, a research ship will
begin surveying the Atlantic
Ocean floor off of Nova Scotia
as the first step to building, by
2013, a $300 million private
fiber-optic line connecting
New York and London fi-
nancial markets so as to speed
up current transmission times
— by about five milliseconds.
Those five milliseconds,
though (according to an April
report in Bloomberg Business
Week), will enable the small
group of firms that are under-
writing the project (and who
will have exclusive use of it) to
earn millions of dollars per
transaction by having their
trade sales arrive five millise-
conds before their competitors’
sales would have arrived.
CULTURAL DIVERSITY
-- Brazil’s Safety Net for the
Poor: Dr. Ivo Pitanguy, the
most celebrated plastic surgeon
in the country, apparently
earned enough money from
well-off clients that he can now
“give back,” by funding and
inspiring more than 200 clinics
to provide low-income women
with enhancement procedures
(face lifts, tummy tucks, butt
lifts) at a reduced, and some-
times no, charge. A local an-
thropology professor told ABC
News, for a March dispatch,
that “(i)n Brazil, plastic sur-
gery is now seen as something
of the norm” (or, as the report-
er put it, “(B)eauty is (consid-
ered) a right, and the poor
deserve to be ravishing, too”).
LATEST RELIGIOUS
MESSAGES
-- Two lawsuits filed in Los
Angeles recently against the
founding family of the reli-
gious Trinity Broadcasting
Network allege that televange-
lists Paul and Jan Crouch have
spent well more than $50 mil-
lion of worshippers’ donations
on “personal” expenses, in-
cluding 13 “mansions,” his-
and-hers private jets, and a
$100,000 mobile home for
Mrs. Crouch’s dogs. The jets
are necessary, the Crouches’
lawyer told the Los Angeles
Times, because the Crouches
receive more death threats than
even the president of the Unit-
ed States. Allegedly, the
Crouches keep millions of
dollars in cash on hand, but
according to their lawyer, that
is merely out of obedience to
the biblical principle of “ow
(ing) no man anything.”
-- High-ranking Vatican
administrator Cardinal Domen-
ico Calcagno, 68, fired back at
critics in April after an Italian
website reported his extensive
collection of guns and love of
shooting. He told reporters that
he owns only 13 weapons and
that, “above all,” he enjoys
“repairing” them rather than
shooting them (although, he
admitted, “I used to go to
shooting ranges”).
QUESTIONABLE
JUDGMENTS
-- Perp’s Remorse: (1) Jason
Adkins was charged in March
in Cynthiana, Ky., with steal-
ing electronic equipment from
the home of a friend. Accord-
ing to police, Adkins admitted
the break-in but said he felt
guilty the next day and return-
ed the items. However, he then
admitted breaking back into
the home two days after that
and re-stealing them. (2) Ivan
Barker was sentenced in March
in England’s Stoke-on-Trent
Magistrates Court for stealing
a laptop computer and ciga-
rettes from the home of a
wheelchair-bound man of his
acquaintance. Barker sub-
sequently visited the man and
apologized for the theft, but
then, during that visit, Barker
stole the man’s new replace-
ment laptop computer and
more cigarettes.
-- At a March town meeting
in Embden, Maine, residents
turned down proposals to re-
name its most notorious street
“Katie Road.” Thus, the name
will remain, as it has for dec-
ades, “Katie Crotch Road.”
Some residents, in addition to
being embarrassed by the
name, also noted the cost of
constantly replacing the street
signs stolen by giggling vis-
itors. (A Kennebec Journal
report noted uncertainty about
the name’s origin. It might
refer to how the road splits in
two, forming a “Y” shape. On
the low side, the name might
refer to an early settler who
would sit on her front porch
without underwear.)
LEAST COMPETENT
CRIMINALS
Relentless: (1) In the early
hours of Jan. 31, police in
Gaston, N.C., were alerted to
five burglaries in a two-block
area that left shattered glass,
broken doors and other dam-
age, but no missing property.
There was also a blood trail
leading from one store, likely
from a break-in boo-boo. (2) In
March, England’s Canterbury
Crown Court heard the evi-
dence against a gang of five
who in August and September
2010 attempted to break into
seven ATMs, using fancy pow-
er tools, but came away empty-
handed each time. Brick walls
were smashed around three
machines, and twice explosives
were used, resulting in fires. In
each case, alarms were trig-
gered, sending the men away
prematurely, including once
from an ATM that contained
the equivalent of $223,000.
W
For more, visit
NewsoftheWeird.
blogspot.com.
In a March interview on Bolivian television, Judge Gualberto Cusi, who
was recently elected to Bolivia’s Constitutional Tribunal from the
indigenous Aymara community, acknowledged that occasionally, when
deciding tough cases, he relied on the Aymaran tradition of “reading”
coca leaves. “In moments when decisions must be taken, we turn to coca
to guide us and show us the way.”
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J U S T A NNOU NC E D !
AUTO SALES DEALER
HAS BEEN AWARDED
The Weekender
Reader’s Choice
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OTHER SERVICES INCLUDE
:
Banquet Room
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THANK YOU FOR VOTING US
BEST PLACE TO HAVE LUNCH!
COME CHECK OUT OUR FINE DINING AND COCKTAIL BAR AT NIGHT
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Look What
You Missed
Mountaingrown Music
w/ Suze
Photos by: Alan K. Stout
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School of Hospitality &Tourism
Hospitality Management & Culinary Arts
The Hospitality Management Degree Program is
designed for students who would like to enter the field
of hospitality and tourism.The Program uses a
guest-centered philosophy along with an emphasis
on communication, marketing management and
advancement of the hospitable experience.
The Culinary Arts Program takes the aspiring chef or
those already working in the field to the next level. We
offer state-of-the-art facilities and access/partnerships
with regional resorts and restaurants.
FIND OUT MORE!
(570) 226-4625 ext. 2606
www.Lackawanna.edu
Hours: Mon-Sat 4 pm-2 am • Sunday Booking Private Parties or Special Events
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inside the Luzerne shopping center - between Allstate and Big Lots
ONLY 1 MIN
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315 Plaza, Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-235-1484
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52 E. Main St., Plymouth • 779-7876
www.rox52.com • Find us on Facebook
KITCHEN
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Find us on
Facebook
but then again ...
By Jim Rising
Weekender Correspondent
E
ver hear of
“Catch-22?” It’s a book
by Joseph Heller from
1961 that’s set in the days of
World War II. The book is
about this famous phrase,
among other things.
“Catch-22” is a general cri-
tique of bureaucratic oper-
ation and reasoning. It
works sort of like this: If
you think that you are crazy,
then you probably are not
because crazy people do not
think that they are crazy.
The reverse is also true. If
you are crazy and think you
are sane, then you are prob-
ably crazy.
It’s circular logic at its
best, and if you are having
trouble following it, don’t
worry about it, you’ll just
make yourself crazy. I bring
it up because I think it rings
especially true in Northeast-
ern Pennsylvania now that
we just suffered through
another bout with election
fever. The 2012 general pri-
mary was yesterday, in case
you missed the one hundred
thousand campaign signs (by
the way, did you know those
little signs are called “bandit
signs?” Just seems appropri-
ate) along the highways and
byways of NEPA. Or the
avalanche of radio and TV
ads that blared night and
day for the last eternity. Or
the promises from the cam-
paigners that the mudsling-
ing would stop while it
piled up knee deep. My TV
needs a good hosing down.
My point? After all the
scandals that have befallen
elected officials in the past
couple of years, after all the
jail sentences and weeping
and wailing and gnashing of
teeth, why would you want
to be elected to anything?
You’d have to be crazy to
want to hold an office, any
office now, wouldn’t you?
And so “Catch-22” rears its
ugly head. If you want to be
an elected official in NEPA,
you are certifiably nuts. The
only sane people are the
ones who are not running.
Count me out. I may be
sane, but I am not stupid. I
have an IQ test to prove it.
I hear your throat clearing.
Something about the need
for men and women of hon-
esty and integrity to fix the
system. For evil to flourish
all it takes is for good men
to do nothing. That sort of
rubbish. Give to me a break,
puh-lease.
I’ll quote Pete Townshend
from The Who song “Won’t
Get Fooled Again” during
which Pete said back in
1971: “Meet the new boss,
same as the old boss.” W
Political signs line an intersection in Wilkes-Barre
during last year’s election.
Fool me once
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R BAR and GRILL
144 West Union Street, Nanticoke, PA
CALL FOR TAKEOUT (570) 258-0505
NANTICOKE’S NEWEST HOTSPOT! NANTICOKE’S NEWEST HOTSPOT!
Weekender Readers Choice Awards 2012
FIRST PLACE — BEST NEWBAR
FIRST PLACE — BEST FEMALE BARTENDER, LAURENMAGA
RUNNER UP — BEST BAR
Come see what everyone is talking about!
OUTDOOR PATIOOPENING SOON!
• Over 25 original summer cocktails!
• Over 15 different Seasonal beers!
• Get “FISHFACED” with one of our 20 oz FISHBOWLS!
• Drunken Gummis (gummis soaked in liquor……
always something different) ONLY$2
For hours and daily specials, go to:
www.facebook.com/rbarandgrill144
All of us at R Bar and Grill would like to thank
everyone who voted for us, and congratulations to all
of the other winners!
O P EN M IC
O P EN M IC
EVER Y W EDN ESDAY EVER Y W EDN ESDAY
T HE BE S T O PE N M IC IN T O W N ! N O C O V E R! $3 L O N G IS L AN D IC E
T E AS & BL UE M O O N PIN T S • $5.9 5 BURGE RS & C HE E S E BURGE RS
FR IDAY FR IDAY
BOB WEIR BEFORE SHOWWITH SOLO MiZ at 6 P.M. BOB WEIR BEFORE SHOWWITH SOLO MiZ at 6 P.M.
PARK AT JAZZ CAFE. RIDE TO THE KIRBY & BACK AVAILABLE PARK AT JAZZ CAFE. RIDE TO THE KIRBY & BACK AVAILABLE
AFTER PARTY with JAMSTAMPEDE AT 11 P.M. AFTER PARTY with JAMSTAMPEDE AT 11 P.M.
R O C K THE W A LL
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6 6 7 N . Riv e rS t., Plains • 822.29 9 2
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C HE C K O UT BO B W E IR DIN N E R PAC K AGE — Includ e s so lo M iz sho w be fo re , C HE C K O UT BO B W E IR DIN N E R PAC K AGE — Includ e s so lo M iz sho w be fo re ,
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THUR SDAY THUR SDAY
JA H M A N B R A H M A N & OL ’ CA B B A G E
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F RE E W IT H C O L L E GE ID. & L O W C O V E R. $3 AL L L O N G T RAIL BE E RS & F RE E W IT H C O L L E GE ID. & L O W C O V E R. $3 AL L L O N G T RAIL BE E RS &
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SATUR DAY SATUR DAY
THE STA TE SM A N
THE STA TE SM A N
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I hav e se e n in a lo ng tim e .” — T o m M o ran • C O O RS L IGHT BO T T L E S $2.50 • N Y S T RIP DIN N E R $16 .85 I hav e se e n in a lo ng tim e .” — T o m M o ran • C O O RS L IGHT BO T T L E S $2.50 • N Y S T RIP DIN N E R $16 .85
SUN DAY
fe aturing S UN T RAIN , BAC K HO M E w ith JO E BO GW IS T ,
W IL L IE JAC K & T HE N O RT HE RN L IGHT also N ADIN E
L aF O N D fe aturing o n GO RDO N ’S C D
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C HE C K O UT V AL L E Y BIK E S N E X T T O T HE JAZ Z C AF E
F O R BIK E S , S E RV IC E & AC C E S S O RIE S 57 0- 822- 2056
N E X T W E E K T HURS DAY M AY 3RD GIAN T S O F L E IS URE N E X T W E E K T HURS DAY M AY 3RD GIAN T S O F L E IS URE
F RIDAY M AY 4T H S T RAW BE RRY JAM F RIDAY M AY 4T H S T RAW BE RRY JAM
S AT URDAY M AY 5T H X V S K W IT H M IK E DO UGHE RT Y S AT URDAY M AY 5T H X V S K W IT H M IK E DO UGHE RT Y
UP AN D C O M IN G E V E N T S M AY 11T H GE O RGE W E S L E Y BAN D S AL UT E S UP AN D C O M IN G E V E N T S M AY 11T H GE O RGE W E S L E Y BAN D S AL UT E S
T HE M US IC O F BO B M ARL E Y M AY 12T H L E RO Y JUS T IC E & S UZ E T HE M US IC O F BO B M ARL E Y M AY 12T H L E RO Y JUS T IC E & S UZ E
M AY 18T H T HE M AHAV IS HN U PRO JE C T PE RF O RM IN G M US IC O F JO HN M AY 18T H T HE M AHAV IS HN U PRO JE C T PE RF O RM IN G M US IC O F JO HN
M C L AUGHL IN & JE F F BE C K M AY 19 T H C ABIN E T M C L AUGHL IN & JE F F BE C K M AY 19 T H C ABIN E T
M AY 25T H HIGH O RGAN IX & IN DO BO X PRE M AY DAY PART Y M AY 25T H HIGH O RGAN IX & IN DO BO X PRE M AY DAY PART Y
M AY 13T H M O T HE RS DAY M AY 13T H M O T HE RS DAY
T AK E Y O UR M O M T O T HE JAZ Z C AF E T AK E Y O UR M O M T O T HE JAZ Z C AF E
S PE C IAL M E N U AN D L IV E JAZ Z S PE C IAL M E N U AN D L IV E JAZ Z
F RO M N O O N UN T IL 6 PM M AK E Y O UR RE S E RV AT IO N N O W F RO M N O O N UN T IL 6 PM M AK E Y O UR RE S E RV AT IO N N O W
W E W O UL D L IK E T O T HAN K E V E RY O N E W HO V O T E D US BE S T O PE N M IC AN D BE S T C L UB S IZ E V E N UE
W E W O UL D L IK E T O T HAN K E V E RY O N E W HO V O T E D US BE S T O PE N M IC AN D BE S T C L UB S IZ E V E N UE
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Flying Colors’ self-titled debut
album is a real showcase for the
talent of the members of the
progressive-rock supergroup. The
five-piece outfit was initially
formed in 2010 by guitarist Steve
Morse (Dixie Dregs, Deep Pur-
ple) and drummer Mike Portnoy
(Dream Theater), later adding
Neal Morse on keyboards, Dave
LaRue on the bass and vocalist
Casey McPherson.
With a lineup as impressive as
this, one would expect nothing
less than a superbly intricate and
well-composed album, and the
band more than exceeds those
expectations.
Impressive and upbeat from
the beginning, Flying Colors
opens strong with “Blue Ocean,”
with each of its seven minutes
full of great hooks, impressive
instrumentals and chorus that
one cannot help but hum along
to. Those features are key ele-
ments of many of the album’s
songs, which mixes excellent
songwriting and skilled musi-
cianship with a lot of studio
polish and sheen.
Occasionally the songs take a
down-and-dirty turn, such as
“Forever in a Daze,” “All Falls
Down” or “Shoulda Coulda
Woulda,” but generally speaking,
the music has that radio-friendly,
big-album feel that would have
been just as at home in 1978 as it
is in 2012. While the rockers are
definitely impressive, where the
band shows its true talent are on
the dreamy, slower numbers such
as “Kayla,” “Fool In My Heart”
and “Better Than Walking
Away.” Each lyric and each note
plays to the listener’s emotional
side, drifting along at a pace that
is easy to follow but never seems
too slow or fanciful.
Fans of traditional prog-rock
artists like Yes, Rush and Genesis
will definitely want to check out
Flying Colors. The band has
created an album that sounds
fresh and modern while paying
homage to a previous generation
of musicians. Songs are full of
energy and life, and listening to
the Flying Colors album makes
the listener feel as though he or
she is taking a journey as op-
posed to just sitting still.
-- Michael Irwin
Weekender Correspondent
RATING:
W W W W
Flying Colors
“Flying Colors”
ALBUM REVIEWS
Flying Colors
passes the test
charts
8. Gotye/Kimbra: “Somebody
That I Used To Know”
7. Calvin Harris: “Feel So Close”
6. Jessie J: “Domino”
5. Gavin DeGraw: “Not Over
You”
4. Train: “Drive By”
3. Katy Perry: “Part of Me”
2. The Wanted: “Glad You
Came”
1. fun./Janelle Monae:
“We Are Young”
Top at 8 with Ralphie Aversa
1. Lionel Richie:
“Tuskegee”
2. Adele: “21”
3. Nicki Minaj: “Pink Friday:
Roman Reloaded”
4. Monica: “NewLife”
5. One Direction: “Up All Night”
6. Bonnie Raitt: “Slipstream”
7. Goyte: “Making Mirrors”
8. Alabama Shakes: “Boys & Girls”
9. Rascal Flatts: “Changed”
10. Hoodie Allen: “All American”
Billboard Top 200 Albums
Harrisburg band The Jellybricks has
always lived up to the innuendo its name
implies: A squishy sweet melodic center
with a hard-nosed rock candy outer shell.
With the new seven-track EP “Suckers,”
the follow-up to 2008’s “Goodnight To
Everyone,” the band combines the best of
Butch Walker’s Marvelous 3-era song
craft and post-“Monster” R.E.M. indie-
rock volume to create a full-blown caffei-
nated sonic addiction.
Particularly notable is lead track, “Rock
’n’ Roll Suicide,” which was recently
chosen by Little Steven Van Zandt as the
“Coolest Song In The World This Week”
for his syndicated “Underground Garage”
radio show. It’s fitting, as the song strad-
dles the line between garage-rock loos-
eness, Brit-Invasion melody and brash,
punkish wallop. “Their Own Way” is a
bittersweet sounding mid-tempo jangler.
The guitar-driven rocker “Someone Else”
sounds like what would have happened
had The Wallflowers been reincarnated as
Cheap Trick, while the unsettlingly ethe-
real “Dead End Girl” is draped in lush,
The Edge-inspired electric soundscaping.
Elsewhere, “Beryllium” rocks with
pointed Foo Fighters-like direction, guita-
rists Larry Kennedy and Bryce Connor
swirl sustained open-stringed resonance,
while passionately musing, “She’s the
fork in the road that I can’t take, she’s the
link in the chain I can’t break.” A bonus
acoustic take on the band’s own 1997 cut
“Who Is God” is also included, recalling
the best of Fountains Of Wayne’s stick-in-
your-head vocal harmony.
Kennedy says this was the “fastest,
most bare-bones record we’ve ever
made.” You’d never know it from the
tightly layered vocals, concise, pop-bril-
liance songwriting and wall-of-sound
production value. Retaining its crown as
Pennsylvania’s reigning power-pop kings,
The Jellybricks dish out another platter of
honey-sweet hooks.
-- Mark Uricheck
Weekender Correspondent
The Jellybricks
“Suckers”
Rating: W W W W W
'Suck' on this
From wondering what might have been
to harkening back to the music of yore,
the past is very much alive and well on “A
Sleep & A Forgetting,” the fourth album
from modernist-pop outfit Islands. The
handiwork of bandleader Nick Thorburn,
who penned much of the album on a
piano after moving from New York to Los
Angeles following a bad breakup, “A
Sleep & A Forgetting” is confessional,
experimental, personal and so very good.
Lead track “In A Dream It Seemed
Real” and “No Crying” have an ethereal
’50s-pop vibe; the former is sweet and
tender with light-handed drumming and a
Wurlitzer piano tinkling fantastically
while the latter has herky-jerky guitar and
Thorburn wondering, “If I don’t feel bad,
is there something wrong?”
“This Is Not A Song” is more subdued,
but pretty with searing Hammond C3
organ and Thorburn declaring, “I hate to
watch you go/ Nick, if you ever learn it
never shows.” “Never Go Solo” has jaun-
ty piano and mellotron while “Hallways”
rollicks amid clapping and synth.
“Can’t Feel My Face” is Del Shannon-
esque, thanks to a Thorburn-helmed farfi-
sa organ and catchy “ooh, oohs.” “Lonely
Love” and “Oh Maria” are airy and heart-
felt, and the former features traipsing,
bluesy guitar. A harpsichord adds a lush
feel to “Cold Again” while “Don’t I Love
You” is a quiet stunner with a country
flair that precedes the slow-as-molasses
closer “Same Thing.”
“I loved a girl, and I will never love
again,” Thorburn promises on that song.
Heartbreaking for sure, but at least a truly
remarkable album was born out of his
unrequited love.
-- Nikki M. Mascali
Weekender Editor
Intimate,
impeccable
Islands
Islands
“A Sleep & A Forgetting”
Rating: W W W W W
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T
hough fans of The Ba-
dlees have probably been
making their own “Best
Of ” mixes of the band’s music
for their cassette decks, CD
players and iPods for nearly 20
years, the band itself had never
offered such a collection.
Until now.
“See Me As A Picture: The
Best, So Far 1990-2012” is now
available at Gallery of Sound
stores. It will also be available
on May 4 at a CD-release party
at The Woodlands in Plains
Twp. And as its title suggests, it
includes material spanning two
decades, plus two new tracks,
“Promises” and “Love Took My
Soul.”
Though 2012 is not a signif-
icant anniversary year for The
Badlees, such as its 20th or
25th year as a band, guitarist,
vocalist and songwriter Bret
Alexander says the time was
right to release such a collec-
tion.
“We probably should have
done it at 20. I think we’re
probably just slow,” he said with
a laugh. “We’ve been talking
about it for a couple of years.”
Alexander said one of the
reasons for releasing the album
is the fact that some of the
band’s early albums are either
out of print or in limited supply,
making it hard for new fans to
find the music.
“At a lot of gigs, we’re play-
ing to a new audience,” he says.
“We wanted to have something
that would give people a real
good nickel tour of everything.”
Since its debut, the critically
acclaimed roots-rock band had
released seven albums and sev-
eral EPs. Still, Alexander said
coming up with “The Best, So
Far” wasn’t that hard.
“As it is with making a new
record, everybody agrees on
about 85 to 90 percent of it,
and then you have to duke it
out for the last several tracks,”
he said. “That’s usually how it
goes with a record, and this
collection was no exception.”
In addition to the new “Best
Of ” collection, there’s plenty of
other movement in The Badlees
camp. A new full-length studio
album will be released in late
2012 or early 2013. Also in
2013, a feature film, titled
“Trust Me” — which is loosely
based on the band’s career —
will be released. And a full rock
documentary on the band is also
in the works. Alexander says the
group is flattered by such in-
terest, but was not the impetus
behind either film.
“That all came from the out-
side,” he says. “The director of
the documentary has piles of
incriminating footage of 22
years of us being us, and he just
wanted to do it. He’s a fan of
the band. We didn’t commission
anybody to make a movie loos-
ely based on us, and we didn’t
commission anybody to do an
all-encompassing documentary.
“Things just seem to be hap-
pening.” W
The Badlees / The Under-
ground Saints / Justin King,
Fri., May 4, 10 p.m., The Wood-
lands (1073 Route 315, Plains
Twp.). Info: badlees.com,
570.824.9831
Badlees 'Best Of' packs punch
By Alan K. Stout
Weekender Correspondent
The Badlees recently released ’See Me As A Picture:
The Best, So Far 1990-2012.’
“We wanted to have
something that
would give people a
real good nickel tour
of everything.”
Bret Alexander
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Wednesday:
Bar on Oak: Line Dancing
Brews Brothers West: Speaker Jam Karaoke/DJ
Elmer Sudds: Robb Brown and Friends
Grotto, Wyoming Valley Mall: Gameshow challenge with DJ Pete Bayo
Hops & Barleys: Karaoke w/ DJ Bounce
Jim McCarthy’s Tavern on the Hill: Karaoke
Ole Tyme Charley’s: DJ EFX All Request Party
River Street Jazz Caféé: Open Mic
Rob’s Pub & Grub: Beer Pong
Rox 52: Comedy Competition
Ruth’s Chris: live music in the lounge
Slate Bar & Lounge: Single Mingle Night
Stan’s Caféé: Open Mic Night w/ Kyle Lucarnio
Woodlands: Blush
V-Spot: Smith (Acoustic)
Thursday:
Bar on Oak: The Tones
Bart & Urby’s: The Still Hand String Band
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: Battle of the Bands
Carey’s Pub: Mr. Echo
Chacko’s: Kartune
Cuz’s Bar & Grille: NFL Draft Day Bash w/ Rule of 3 performing live
Huns’ West Side Caféé: DJ King B
King’s Bar & Restaurant: Open Mic
Liam’s: Banga Bros presents Infusion
Mert’s : The Chatter
Ole Tyme Charley’s: Karaoke
River Grille: College Night w/ DJ Ooh Wee
River Street Jazz Caféé: Jahman Brahman & Ol’ Cabbage
Rob’s Pub & Grub: Karaoke
Rox 52: Beer Pong
Rum Runnerz, Dunmore: Speaker Jam Karaoke/DJ
Ruth’s Chris: live music in the lounge
Slate Bar & Lounge: DJ Jam
Tommyboys Bar & Grill: Gone Crazy
Woodlands: DJ Davey B, DJ Data (Club HD)
V-Spot: Jackson Vee (Acoustic)
Friday:
Bar on Oak: Group du Jour
Bart & Urby’s: Bob Weir afterparty w/ the Still Hand String Band & Bone
Jack
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: Nowhere Slow
Brews Brothers, Pittston: Country night w/ DJ Crocket
Chacko’s: WTF
Cuz’s Bar & Grille: The Tomkin St. duo
Grotto, Harveys Lake: Jeanne Zano
Grotto, Wyoming Valley Mall: Teddy Young duo
Jim McCarthy’s Tavern on the Hill: DJ Liz
Liam’s: PaulSKO
Metro Bar & Grill: Strawberry Jam
Ole Tyme Charley’s: The Phyllis Hopkins Band
Other Side Bar, Freeland: Speaker Jam Karaoke/DJ
OverPour: 20 Lb. Head
River Street Jazz Caféé: MIZ 6 p.m., Bob Weir after party w/ Jam Stampede
11 p.m.
Rob’s Pub & Grub: Breakdown Jimmy
Rox 52: Free Jukebox
Ruth’s Chris: live music in the lounge
Senunas’: Jam Style Trio feat. Adam McKinley of Suze
Slate Bar & Lounge: Sperazza Band
Stan’s Caféé: Jax
Tommyboy’s Bar & Grill: Lee Strumski 5:30-7:30 then later The Fallen
Woodlands: (Evolution) DJ Kev,DJ Davey B, Generation Next, Rockabilly &
45s
V-Spot: Exit 22
Saturday:
Bar on Oak: Lipstyk
Bart & Urby’s: Bret Alexander & AJ Jump
Big Dogz: Mr. Echo
Breakers, Mohegan Sun: Kartune
Brews Brothers, Luzerne: Larry George
Brews Brothers, Pittston: Dance Party w/ DJ Mike Riley
Carey’s Pub: World Famous Dance Party w/ B Hillard & Mac Dog, UFC
145
Chacko’s: Oz
Cuz’s Bar & Grille: Cuz’s Karaoke w/ DJ Commander
The Getaway Lounge: Gone Crazy
Golden Cue, Hazleton: Speaker Jam Karaoke/DJ
Hun’s West Side Caféé: Kieran’s B-Day w/ Robb Brown
Jim McCarthy’s Tavern on the Hill: Oldies Karaoke
King’s Bar and Restaurant: Teddy Young
La Tolteca: DJ Diva – 5pm, Souled Out – 8pm
Liam’s: Chillin’ In Public
Ole Tyme Charley’s: Karaoke and Rage! DJ’s
River Grille: DJ Ooh wee
River Street Jazz Caféé: The Statesman
Rob’s Pub & Grub: Zbick Road
Rox 52: Free Jukebox
Ruth’s Chris: live music in the lounge
Senunas’: DJ Bounce
Slate Bar & Lounge: 3
rd
Degree
Stan’s Caféé: Billy & Gary from Stonecats
Tommyboys Bar & Grill: Lewis Foundation afterparty, Sheila Mark Band
Woodlands: (Evolution) DJ Kev, Xclusive & The Soul Revival
V-Spot: S.F.S. Benefit, 5 Bands, AC/DC, Rush, Sabbath tribute bands
Sunday:
Brews Brothers, Luzerne: Robb Brown
Carey’s Pub: DJ Santiago & Karaoke
La Tolteca: DJ Diva, Salsa Lessons 7pm
Metro Bar & Grill: Don Shappelle & the Pickups
Tommyboys Bar & Grill: Nascar
River Street Jazz Caféé: Rock the Wall Benefit feat. Suntrain, Back Home
w/ Joe Bogwist, Willie Jack & The Northern Light and also Nadine LaFond
Sands Casino: Mr. Echo
Stan’s Caféé: Free Jukebox 7-11
Woodlands: The Tones w/ DJ Godfather
V-Spot: Gong Karaoke
Monday:
Jim McCarthy’s Tavern on the Hill: Unplugged Monday - Open Mic
River Grille: Bean Bag Toss Tournaments
Rob’s Pub & Grub: NEPA Beer Pong
Tuesday:
Brews Brothers, Luzerne: Open Mic Night w/ Paul Martin
Elmer Sudds: Sandypants
Hops & Barleys: Aaron Bruch
Huns’ West Side Caféé: AJ Jump and Dustin Drevitch
Jim McCarthy’s: Karaoke
La Tolteca: Live Mariachi Band
Ole Tyme Charley’s: Karaoke & DJ Fiyawerx
Slate Bar & Lounge: DJ Linda
Tommyboys Bar & Grill: Open Mic Night
The Woodlands: Karaoke – DJ Godfather
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ACOUSTIC TUESDAYS ACOUSTIC TUESDAYS
AARON
AARON
BRUCH
BRUCH
$2 IMPORTS 10-12 $2 IMPORTS 10-12
EVERYWEDNESDAY EVERYWEDNESDAY
KARAOKE
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with DJ BOUNCE
with DJ BOUNCE
10 pm-2 am 10 pm-2 am
$1 MILLER LITE DRAFTS $1 MILLER LITE DRAFTS
10-12 10-12
GET READY FOR OUR
GET READY FOR OUR
CINCO DE MAYO PARTY!
CINCO DE MAYO PARTY!
SATURDAY, MAY 5
SATURDAY, MAY 5
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7
3
4
8
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Thurs., 4/26
Open Mic Night
Carey’s Pub
Kingston • 10-1
Sat., 4/28
Big Dogz
Hughesville • 10-1
Sun., 4/29
Sands Casino
Bethelem • 8-12
PLAYING VINTAGE TUNES AT A BAR NEAR YOU!
ZEPPELIN • BEATLES • DOORS • STONES
AND MANY MORE
WWW.MRECHOBAND.COM
FACEBOOK.COM/MrEchoBand
[email protected]
7
5
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9
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FRIDAY
THURSDAY
SUNDAY
WEDNESDAY
WEDNESDAY
SATURDAY
FRIDAY WEDNESDAY
STAN’S CAFE
570.829.9779
CLAMS
15¢ EACH
IHO
OPEN MIC NIGHT W/
KYLE LUCARNIO 8-12
MUSIC/COMEDY/
OPEN JAM SESSION
BILLY & GARY
FROM STONECATS
9-1
HANDCUT
BONELESS WINGS
$2.95 1/2 LB.
JAX
COME CELEBRATE
JIMBO’S BIG 3-0!
FREE JUKEBOX
GENNY TWELVEHORSE
ALE
$1.25 ALL DAY
NEVER A COVER
AT THE CORNER OF E. NORTHAMPTON AND HILLSIDE ST. WILKES-BARRE
KITCHEN HOURS: SUN 8-1, WED-SAT 5-9
570-235-1037 • 279 South River St, Plains 18705
(located across from bakery delite)
MONDAY
35¢WINGS
YUENGLING
PINTS
YUENGS & WINGS
TWISTED TUESDAYS
$1.50
TUESDAY
STEAMERS
APRIL 27 @ 10PM
TWISTED TEA
BOMBS
$4.95
$3.00
WEDNESDAY
MILLER LITE PINTS
BURGERS
$1.50
$5.00
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SUNDAY
OFF ANY PIZZA
CHEESESTEAKS
COORS LIGHT
BOTTLES
BOMBS
$2.00
$5.00
$2.00
20LB HEAD
$3.00
Happy
Hour
1.50 DOM PINTS,
$3 MIXERS,
$5 MARTINIS
MON-FRI 5-7
SAT & SUN 8-10
MON & TUES: 4 P.M.-2 A.M. WED-SUN: NOON - 2 A.M.
NEW
MENU
ITEMS
COMING
SOON!
760 N. Washington St., Wilkes-Barre • 822-2154
PAULSKO
FREE PIZZA FROM PIZZA BELLA
TUES. & WED.
THURSDAY BANGA BROS. PRESENTS
FRIDAY
INFUSION
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SATURDAY
CHILLIN’ IN PUBLIC
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concerts
15TH ANNUAL BRIGGS
FARM BLUESFEST
- July 6-7 at Briggs Farm, Nescopeck
Twp. Main Stage, Fri.: Eddy “The
Chief” Clearwater, Linsey Alexander,
Alexis P. Suter Band, Chris Beard;
Sat.: Bernard Allison, Moreland &
Arbuckle, Butterfield Blues Band,
Rory Block. Back Porch Stage, Fri.:
Lonnie Shields, The CKS Band, Clar-
ence Spady, Mikey Junior, Rare Form;
Sat.: Lonnie Shields, Sarah Ayers,
Michael Packer Sam Lay, Jesse
Lowey, Symphonic Haze. Info/direc-
tions: briggsfarm.com, 570.379.3342.
COVE HAVEN
ENTERTAINMENT RESORTS
1.877.800.5380
www.CPResorts.com
- Paul Rodriguez: May 4
- Blondy & The Mambo Machine: May
4-5
- Mya / Kel: May 27
- Boyz II Men: June 10
- Howie Mandel: July 22
- The Charlie Daniels Band: Sept. 2
THE CRIMSON LION
HOOKAH LOUNGE
37 E. South St., Wilkes-Barre
- Big Digits / Mascara / Wicca Phase
Springs Eternal: May 6, 7 p.m., $5, 18+
F.M. KIRBY CENTER
71 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre
Phone: 570.826.1100
- Bob Weir: April 27, 8 p.m., $41.85-
$52.60
- 88 Keys and 24 Sons: April 29,
TIMES VARY, $21.40
- Vicki Lawrence and Mama: May 4, 8
p.m., $25-$45
- Riverdance: May 8, 7:30 p.m., $43-
$63
- Willie Nelson and Family: May 11, 8
p.m., $43-$80
- Tony Bennett: June 2, 8 p.m., $70-
$126
- NEPA Philharmonic Tribute to Benny
Goodman: June 9, 8 p.m., $35.50-
$73.45
- Zappa Plays Zappa: June 28, 7:30
p.m., $29.50-$75
- Jim Gaffigan: July 26, 7 p.m.
- Celtic Thunder: Oct. 6, 7:30 p.m.
$65-$75
MAUCH CHUNK OPERA
HOUSE
14 W. Broadway, Jim Thorpe
570.325.0249
mauchchunkoperahouse.com
- Start Making Sense (Talking Heads
tribute) / The Great White Caps: April
28, 8 p.m., $20
- Wishbone Ash: April 28, 8 p.m., $28
- Gershwin by Thomas Pandolfi: April
29, 4 p.m., $20
- Childhood’s End (Pink Floyd tribute):
May 4, 8 p.m., $23
- Marko Marcinko Latin Jazz Quintet:
May 5, 8 p.m., $23
- Mike Farris: May 11, 8 p.m., $18
- Bennie and the Jets (Elton John
tribute): May 12, 8 p.m., $23
- Pianist Giorgi Latsabidze: May 13,
$20
- The Barr Brothers / Kishi Bashi: May
18, 8 p.m., $17
- Miz: May 19, 8 p.m., $15
- Bill Kirchen / Too Much Fun: May 26,
8 p.m., $23
- The “The Band” Band: June 1, 8 p.m.,
$20
- Cabinet: June 8, 8 p.m., $18 advance,
$20 day of
- Craig Thatcher’s Salute to the
Fillmore: June 9, 8 p.m., $20
- The Peek-A-Boo Revue: June 16, 8:30
p.m., $21
- Leon Redbone: June 22, 8 p.m., $33
- The Felice Brothers: June 23, 8 p.m.,
$25
- US Rails: June 29, 8 p.m., $14
- The Cast of Beatlemania: June 30, 8
p.m., $25
- Sierra Hull / Highway 111: July 7, 8
p.m., $20
- Red Horse: July 21, $25
- Dancin’ Machine: July 20, 8 p.m., $21
- The Persuasions: July 21, 8 p.m., $23
- Solas: July 26, 8 p.m., $28
- Hot Buttered Rum: July 27, 8 p.m.,
$23
- U2Nation: July 28, 8 p.m., $20
MOHEGAN SUN ARENA
255 Highland Park Blvd., Wilkes-Barre
Twp.
- WWE Smackdown: May 22, 7 p.m.,
$15-$95
MOUNT LAUREL PAC
1 Tamiment Road, Tamiment
866.448.7849
mtlaurelpac.com
- The Guess Who: June 8, $37.50-
$67.50, 7 p.m.
- Robert Cray / Little Feat: June 9, 7
p.m., $45.50-$75.50
- Ziggy Marley: June 15, $42.50-
$72.50, 7 p.m.
- The Temptations: July 22, 4 p.m.,
$32.50-$62.50
- The Rock ’n’ Blues Fest ft. Johnny
Winter / Edgar Winter / Leslie West /
Rick Derringer / Kim Simmonds: Aug.
19, 6 p.m., $45.50-$75.50
MOUNT AIRY CASINO
RESORT
44 Woodland Rd., Mount Pocono
Phone: 877.682.4791
www.mountairycasino.com
- Voices of Legends w/ Eric Kearns:
May 8, 29, 2 p.m., $20, Gypsies
- Andrew Dice Clay: April 28, 8 p.m.,
$50-$65, Gypsies
- Tito Puente Jr.: May 5, 8 p.m., $20-
$30, Gypsies
- Parrot Beach: May 27, 8 p.m., free
- Chippendales: June 9, 8 p.m., $20-
$30
- Colin Quinn: June 30, 8 p.m., $30-
$40
- KC & The Sunshine Band: July 20, 9
p.m., $40-$55
NEW VISIONS STUDIO &
GALLERY
201 Vine St., Scranton
570.878.3970
- Acoustic Showcase: April 28, 7:30
p.m., doors 7 p.m. $6/door. Daniel
Rosler / Ed Cuozzo / Rafiel Pimentel /
Patrick Mcglynn / Danny Jackowitz
PENN’S PEAK
325 Maury Road, Jim Thorpe
866.605.7325 or visit pennspeak.com.
- Aaron Tippin: April 27, 8 p.m., $33-
$38.75
- Beatlemania Now: May 4, 8 p.m., $25
- Get The Led Out (Led Zeppelin
tribute): May 5, 8 p.m., $41.75
- Survivor: May 6, 8 p.m., $32
- Dennis DeYoung: May 12, 8 p.m.,
$42.75-$48.25
- Dark Star Orchestra (Grateful Dead
tribute): May 31, 8 p.m., $32
- Kansas: June 1, 8 p.m., $40.75-$46.25
- Nitty Gritty Dirt Band: June 2, 8
p.m., $32
- America: June 8, 8 p.m., $43.75-
$49.25
- Molly Hatchet / Blackfoot: June 9, 8
p.m., $33
- Kellie Pickler: June 14, 8 p.m., $32-
$37
- 7 Bridges (Eagles tribute): June 15, 8
p.m., $25
- The Machine: June 16, 8 p.m. $33-
$38.75
- Steven Wright: June 24, 8 p.m.,
$29-$34
- Foreigner: June 29, 8 p.m., $54.25-
$65.25
- Johnny Winter / Magic Slim & The
Teardrops: June 30, 8 p.m., $33
- Cinderella: July 1, 8 p.m., $38.75
- Arrival (Abba tribute): July 13, 8
p.m., $31-$36.75
- Jim Messina: July 20, 8 p.m., $31
- Vince Gill: Aug. 18, 8 p.m., $59.25-
$64.25
POCONOTES LLC
Tickets: 570.941.0411
888.800.POCO
www.poconotes.com
- “The Faces and Voices of the Blues”
ft. photos by Jim Gavenus / voice of
Toby Walker: June 8-10, Tripp House
(1011 N. Main Ave., Scranton). Three-
day pass: $35 VIP, $25 GA, $10 stu-
dents/seniors. $5 of tickets benefits
Tripp House preservation
REDWOOD ART SPACE
740 Jumper Road, Plains Twp.
- Big D and the Kids Table / When
East Meets West / Stag-nation: May
12, 7:30 p.m.
- Ceremony / Screaming Females:
June 11, 7 p.m., $10, all-ages
RIVER STREET JAZZ CAFE
667 N. River St., Plains
Phone: 570.822.2992
- Jahman Brahman / Ol’ Cabbage:
April 26, 8 p.m.
- Miz: April 27, 5 p.m.
- Jam Stampede: April 27, 9 p.m.
- The Statesman: April 28, 8 p.m.
- Rock the Walls ft. Joe Bogwist /
Willie Jack / The Northern Light /
Nadine LaFond: April 29, 5 p.m., $10
advance, $15 at door, $35 fan pack,
includes admission, T-shirt, poster
and signing the sheetrock that will
be displayed at new location of SG.
- Strawberry Jam: May 4, 8 p.m.
- XVSK / Mike Dougherty: May 5, 9
p.m.
- George Wesley Band: May 11, 8 p.m.
- Leroy Justice / Suze: May 12, 8 p.m.
- Mahavishnu Project: May 18, 8 p.m.
- Cabinet: May 19, 8 p.m.
- The Indobox / Higher Organix: May
25, 8 p.m.
SCRANTON CULTURAL
CENTER
420 N. Washington Ave., Scranton
Phone: 888.669.8966
- NEPA Philharmonic Haydn / Brahms,
A German Requiem: April 27, 8 p.m.,
$34.50-$73.15
SHERMAN THEATER
524 Main St., Stroudsburg
Phone: 570.420.2808, www.sherman-
theater.com
- Light Up The Sherman: April 27, 9
p.m., $8 advance, $27 day of
- The Femme Tops / Rezlep / The
Apparatus: May 2, 7 p.m., $5
- Broadway in the Burg: May 5, 8
p.m., $25
- Howard Hewett / Blue Magic / Ray
Goodman / Brown: May 12, 8 p.m.,
$39.95
- Pinelawn Empire / Timmy Rot /
Obed / Teddy Hazard: May 15, 7 p.m.,
$5
- Horse / Tile: May 26, 7 p.m., $5
- This Good Robot / Refuse the Con-
formity / Twisting Life, more: June 1,
6 p.m., $10
- Survay Says: June 6, 6 p.m.
- David Bromberg: June 8, 8 p.m.,
$35-$45
- Marshall Tucker Band: June 9, 8:30
p.m., $15-$25
- Mayweather: June 19, 6 p.m., $8
- Hot Tuna Electric / Steve Kimock:
June 28, 8 p.m., $25-$40
- 311 / Slightly Stoopid (Sherman
Summer Stage, Pocono Raceway,
Long Pond): July 31, 7 p.m., $49.50
THREE KINGS
603 Route 6, Jermyn
- Sepulture / Krisiun: May 1, 6 p.m.
- Dropdown / Alekhine’s Gun: May 7, 7
p.m.
- The Plot in You / Existence / Kill the
Coward: May 14, 6:30 p.m., $12
- WXW Memorial Mayhem: May 19, 6
p.m.
- G. Love & Special Sauce: June 26,
8:30 p.m., $20 advance, $22 day of
(on sale 4/27, 10 a.m.)
TOYOTA PAVILION AT
MONTAGE MOUNTAIN
1000 Montage Mountain Road, Scran-
ton
- Megadeth / Rob Zombie / Lacuna
Coil: May 12, 7 p.m., $44-$65.50
- Dave Matthews Band: May 28, 7
p.m., $53.35-$89.90
- ZZ Top / 3 Doors Down / The Ben
Miller Band: May 30, 7 p.m., $40
- Vans Warped Tour ft. Taking Back
Sunday / New Found Glory / Motion-
less In White, more: July 18, noon,
$37.50
- Rockstar Energy Drink Mayhem
Festival ft. Motorhead / Slayer /
Slipknot / As I Lay Dying / The Devil
Wears Prada / Asking Alexandria,
more: Aug. 4, $42-$74.50
- The Peach Music Festival ft. Allman
Brothers Band / Zac Brown Band /
Tedeschi Trucks Band / Warren
Haynes Band / O.A.R. /Cabinet / Miz,
more: Aug. 10-12, $99-$225
- Kiss / Motley Crue: Sept. 18, 7 p.m.,
$50.85-$185
UNDER THE STARS
SUMMER ARTS FESTIVAL
Wells Fargo Amphitheatre at Miser-
icordia University, Dallas.
Phone: 570.674.6719
www.misericordia.edu/theartsand-
more
- Neil Sedaka: July 27, 8 p.m. Tables
of 6/$420, amphitheater tickets/$45,
lawn seats/$30. (On sale 5/1 exclu-
sively through University Box Office)
- Jazz in July concert feat. Midiri
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Brothers Septet: July 9, 8 p.m. Ta-
bles of 6/$120, amphitheater tickets/
$15, lawn seats/$8. (On sale 5/1 exclu-
sively through University Box Office)
PHILADELPHIA
ELECTRIC FACTORY
3421 Willow St., Philadelphia
Phone: 215.LOVE.222
- Miike Snow / Penguin Prison: April
27, 8 p.m.
- The Cranberries: May 5, 8:30 p.m.
- Ingrid Michaelson: May 12, 8:30 p.m.
THE FILLMORE AT THE
TLA
334 South St., Philadelphia
Phone: 215.922.1011
- Schoolboy Q / Asaad! / Paris Artelli,
more: April 26, 7 p.m.
- Twiztid / Kottonmouth Kings: April
27, 6 p.m.
- Fun: April 28, 7 p.m.
- The Weeknd: April 29, 7 p.m.
- Candlebox / Acidic / Honor By
August: May 1, 7 p.m.
- Dieselboy / Bare / Smash Gordon,
more: May 3, 8 p.m.
- The Dan Band: May 4, 8 p.m.
- Escape the Fate / Attack Attack:
May 5, 5:30 p.m.
KESWICK THEATER
Easton Road-Keswick Ave, Glenside,
Pa.
Phone: 215.572.7650
- Colin Hay: April 28, 8:30 p.m.
- Nick Low & His Band / Tift Merritt:
April 29, 7:30 p.m.
- Lily Tomlin: May 3, 8 p.m.
- Vince Gill: May 4, 8 p.m.
- Doo Wop Love Songs & Memories:
May 5, 8 p.m.
TOWER THEATER
69th and Ludlow Sts. Upper Darby
Phone: 610.352.2887
- Death Cab For Cutie / Magik Magik
Orchestra / Low: April 25, 8 p.m.
- Straight No Chaser: April 29, 7:30
p.m.
- The Shins / Real Estate: May 3, 8
p.m.
TROCADERO
10th & Arch St, Philadelphia
Phone: 215.336.2000
- The Motet: April 26
- Conspirator: April 27, 9 p.m.
- Sabaton: May 3, 7:30 p.m.
- The Legwarmers (’80s tribute): May
5, 9 p.m.
- Behemoth, more: May 6, 5:30 p.m.
SUSQUEHANNA BANK
CENTER
1 Harbour Blvd., Camden, NJ.
Phone: 609.365.1300
- Lady Antebellum / Darius Rucker /
Thompson Square: May 19, 7 p.m.
WELLS FARGO CENTER
Broad St., Philadelphia
Phone: 215.336.3600
- Rammstein: April 26, 8 p.m.
- Red Hot Chili Peppers / Sleigh
Bells: May 11, 8 p.m.
ELSEWHERE IN PA
CROCODILE ROCK
520 Hamilton St, Allentown
Phone: 610.434.460
- Blood on the Dance Floor, more:
April 25, 4:30 p.m.
- Tyler Hilton / Dion Roy: April 25, 6
p.m.
- Reverse Order / Sunday Night
Scene: April 27, 6 p.m.
- Candlebox: April 27, 8 p.m.
- GWAR, more: April 28, 7 p.m.
- Dev / Outasight / Wynter Gordon:
May 2, 6 p.m.
GIANT CENTER
950 Hersheypark Dr., Hershey
Phone: 717.534.3911
- Lady Antebellum / Darius Rucker /
Thompson Square: May 6, 7 p.m.
- WWE Smackdown: May 15, 7 p.m.
SANDS BETHLEHEM
77 Sands Blvd., Bethlehem
Phone:
- Incubus: May 16, 8:30 p.m.
- The Beach Boys: May 17, 8 p.m.
- Glenn Fry: May 18, 8 p.m.
- Alan Jackson: May 19, 8 p.m.
- Blink-182: May 20, 7:30 p.m.
- Flogging Molly: May 24, 8 p.m.
- Melissa Etheridge: May 26, 8 p.m.,
$49.50-$99.50
- Paul Anka: May 27, 8 p.m.
- NBC Fight Night @ The Sands: June
1, 6:30 p.m., $50-$75
- Gavin DeGraw / Colbie Caillat: June
5, 7 p.m., $35-$55
SOME KIND OF JAM 7
www.jibberjazz.com
- April 27-29, Schuylkill Haven. Music,
camping festival. Toubab Krewe /
Cornmeal / Thunder Body / Holy
Ghost Tent Revival / The Big Dirty /
Bawn in the Mash / Twiddle / Bear-
quarium / Sweet Earth / Mystery
Fyre / Jahman Brahman / River City
Slim & The Zydeco Hogs / Echoes
Talk Back / Dr. Ketchup / Karmic
Juggernaut / The Great White Caps /
Rotten Belly Blues / Underground
Horns / The Whiskeyhickon Boys /
Muppet’s Titanium Stardust Machine
/ Treehouse / Hot Club of Philadel-
phia / Ratboy Jr. $55 presale tickets.
NEW YORK / NEW JERSEY
BEACON THEATER
2124 Broadway, New York, NY.
Phone: 212.496.7070
- Death Cab for Cutie / The Magik
Magik Orchestra: April 27-29, 8 p.m.
- Andrew Bird: May 4-5, 8 p.m.
BETHEL WOODS CENTER
Bethel NY
www.bethelwoodscenter.org
- Country Joe McDonald’s Tribute to
Woody Guthrie: May 5, 8 p.m.
HAMMERSTEIN BALLROOM
311 W. 34th St, New York, NY.
Phone: 212.279.7740
- DJ Prostyle / Fabolous / Wale: April
30, 8 p.m.
- Daughtry / Safetysuit / Mike San-
chez: May 1, 7:30 p.m.
THE FILLMORE AT IRVING
PLAZA
17 Irving Place, New York, N.Y.
Phone: 212.777.6800
- Kina Grannis: April 25, 7 p.m.
- Yann Tiersen: April 27, 8 p.m.
- Conspirator: April 28, 8 p.m.
- Twiztid / Kottonmouth Kings, more:
April 29, 6 p.m.
- Sepultura, more: April 30, 7 p.m.
- Timeflies: May 3, 7 p.m.
RADIO CITY MUSIC HALL
1260 Ave. of the Americas, NY, NY
Phone: 212.307.717
- Barry Manilow: April 30, May 1-2, 8
p.m.
ROSELAND BALLROOM
239 52nd Street, New York, NY.
Phone: 212.777.6800
- Mac Miller: April 25, 8 p.m.
- Squeeze / The English Beat: April
28, 8 p.m.
BORGATA HOTEL AND
CASINO
Atlantic City, NJ
Phone:1.866.MYBORGATA.com
- Mike Marino: April 27, 9 p.m.
- Counting Crows: April 28, 8 p.m.
- Russell Brand: May 4-5, 9 p.m.
W
compiled by Nikki M. Mascali,
Weekender Editor
PHOTO BY JASON RIEDMILLER
Going solo
Grateful Dead founding member Bob Weir will return to the
F.M. Kirby Center (71 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre) Friday, April
27 at 8 p.m. This solo acoustic performance comes on the heels
of Weir’s November performance with Furthur here in NEPA.
Tickets are $41.85-$52.60 and can be purchased through Ticket-
master or at the box office. For more info, call the venue at
570.826.1100.
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Rob’s Rob’s
YOU BELONG HERE!
LARKSVILLE, YOU NOW HAVE...
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THANK YOU FOR VOTING FOR US.
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YOU BELONG HERE!
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C
abinet has forged its own
path since its inception six
years ago. The sextet —
J.P. Biondo, Pappy Biondo,
Mickey Coviello, Todd Kopec,
Dylan Skursky and Jami Novak
— took what was back then,
especially locally, a left-of-center
musical turn into bluegrass.
Since then, Cabinet has fre-
quented bluegrass festivals, ap-
peared at SXSW and traveled all
over the country playing with the
likes of Railroad Earth, Keller
Williams, 7 Walkers and more,
all while seeing its genre grow
continuously thanks to newer
artists like The Avett Brothers
and Mumford & Sons.
“They’ve recently popularized
the more, I guess, Americana
bluegrass kind of thing, more
roots-based acoustic kind of
music, but also at the same time,
doing something a little differ-
ent,” guitarist/vocalist Coviello
told the Weekender last week. “I
think that corresponds to what
we do, too. We have all the
acoustic instruments, but we’re
doing something a little differ-
ent.”
Such as playing more tradi-
tional bluegrass festivals with
drums, for example.
“That’s a big no-no — people
get really uptight about it,” Co-
viello said. “Bill Monroe
wouldn’t be where he is if he
didn’t try something new. Ev-
erything has to evolve — you
can’t keep playing the same old
stuff.”
Cabinet released its self-titled
debut CD in 2008, and two live
albums — “This Is Cabinet —
Set 1” and “This Is Cabinet —
Covers” followed in 2010 and
2011 respectively. This week, the
band released “Eleven,” a live
CD/DVD combo recorded Nov.
11, 2011 at Abbey Bar in Harris-
burg, a former World War II
aircraft-parts factory turned
brewery.
“We’ve kind of stalled with
going back into the studio to
record our second album, so it
was something else to put out to
hold people over,” Coviello ex-
plained.
Unlike its previous live outings
on which the band culled the
best-sounding songs from ran-
dom performances, “Eleven” was
from just that one night.
“You had to be on all night,
which barely happens anyway,”
Coviello said with a laugh, add-
ing that the album was recorded
straight through with no extra
takes.
Knowing the show was going
to be recorded live encouraged
the band to rehearse more than
normal beforehand.
“I didn’t let it freak me out or
anything,” the guitarist said. “For
me, it was just another perform-
ance, that’s what we do.”
“Eleven” includes “Tower,”
“Treesap,” “Old Farmers Mill”
and previously unreleased songs.
“Some of those unreleased
tracks will definitely end up on
the next album, along with others
that haven’t been heard and even
really, really, really old stuff that
we never got down to recording,”
Coviello shared.
With the bulk of the album
recorded over the winter before
Cabinet went on tour, Coviello
hinted that it could be out as soon
as this summer or by the fall at
the latest.
“We’ve kind of been planning
it, and we haven’t been able to
get back in the studio, but when
we get some free time — if we
get some free time — we’ll see
what happens,” he said.
Coviello wasn’t joking about
free time: Cabinet’s dance card is
filling up fast with upcoming
festivals and shows throughout
the East Coast, including Floyd-
Fest in Virginia and the Peach
Music Festival at Toyota Pavilion
at Montage Mountain in August.
The weekend-long Peach Mu-
sic Festival is the first camping-
friendly event held at the venue
and features a vast lineup that
includes The Allman Brothers
Band, O.A.R., Warren Haynes
Band and many others, some of
whom are playing NEPA for the
first time, though there’s one set
Coviello is excited to watch.
“I want to see the Zac Brown
Band because I know he’s known
for his songwriting, but he also
can pick pretty well, too,” Coviel-
lo said. “And he had Tony Rice,
who’s one of my favorite guitar
players, play on a track on his
last album.”
While Cabinet plays a lot of
shows on its own, there’s a cer-
tain something about doing the
festival circuit.
“It’s definitely more liberal,”
Coviello began. “I feel a lot more
free to go into outer space a little
more with the music, to be a little
bit more improvisational and not
worry about anything because it’s
a festival. People go to have a
good time — a lot of it is about
the experience.” W
Cabinet “Eleven” live CD/DVD
available now. Info: cabinet-
music.com
Cabinet released ’Eleven’ this week. The live CD/DVD,
seen below, was recorded at Abbey Bar in Harrisburg
Nov. 11, 2011.
Cabinet turns it
up to 'Eleven'
By Nikki M. Mascali
Weekender Editor
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movie review
D
irector Scott Hicks so
saturates “The Lucky
One” with summery hues
and sun-kissed cinematography
that all stars Zac Efron and
Taylor Schilling have to do is
stare longingly into the woodsy
distance. Their slow motion
movements in swimming holes
and woodsy acres speak of a
passion found only in obnoxious
greeting cards, teenage poetry
and Cinemax late night.
I suspect those qualities drew
millions to “The Lucky One,”
adapted from yet another Nicho-
las Sparks novel, this past week-
end. It’s the romance as fast
food: Quick, easy and devoid of
anything remotely substantive.
Sometimes this can be satis-
fying. Not with “The Lucky
One,” whose thick layer of gloss
drowns anything genuine. Hicks
and company only care about
the payoff, not about how we
get there, which is a good way
to make a lousy romance.
The story begins in Iraq,
where Logan (Efron), a veteran
Marine, is gutting out his third
tour of duty. In the sweltering
daytime, his eyes spot a gleam.
He walks over and finds a photo
of a pretty young woman, the
words “Keep Safe” written on
the back. Moments later, the
area where Logan previously
stood gets blown to smithereens.
Returning home, a shell-
shocked-but-still-hunky Logan is
determined to personally thank
this mystery woman. Thanks to
a distinctive lighthouse in the
photo, he walks to small town
Hamden, La., and gets a name
to match that divine face. Beth
(Schilling) runs an adorably
rustic dog kennel. Logan visits
Beth with the intention of telling
her why he came but can’t find
the words. She thinks he’s in-
quiring about a job. He doesn’t
correct her. And an affair to
forget begins.
Aside from that buried secret,
issues abound. Beth struggles
with the inconclusive death of
her brother, a Marine killed in
action. Logan and Beth must
contend with her brutish ex-
husband (Jay R. Ferguson), a
lawdog determined to keep her
and their precocious son (Riley
Thomas Stewart) in town.
Ferguson plays his part like
he’s wearing a top hat and twir-
ling a handlebar moustache. You
half expect him to haul Schilling
over his shoulder and tie her to
railroad tracks. Everyone is
either a caricature or a good-
looking prop. Blythe Danner, as
Beth’s grandmother, provides
periodic sage advice, like a
twangy fortune cookie. Schilling
gets presented as a saint in sum-
mer dresses and tiny jean shorts
— I can’t recall one scene
where she wears pants — whose
defining qualities (gasp!) are
that she loves animals and chil-
dren. Efron pointlessly broods;
his stubble is the most expres-
sive aspect of his performance.
Logan and Beth are concepts,
not characters, so Efron and
Schilling can’t elevate the film
beyond its cuddly preposterous-
ness. Hicks blocks any progress
by having cinematographer Alar
Kivilo shoot the movie like a
super-expensive, really long
commercial for Country Time
lemonade. “The Lucky One’s”
simple-minded presentation —
every major life event is cele-
brated with a dopey montage;
every emotional scene has a
showy shot to match — only
reinforces its shallowness. But,
hey, at least the movie looks
good. It worked for “War
Horse.”
At the end of my screening,
the audience burst into applause.
Not only was that the most
surprising part of “The Lucky
One,” it was the only part of the
movie that didn’t feel contrived.
You can read more of Pete’s
cinematic musings at
whatpeteswatching.
blogspot.com or follow
@PeteCroatto.
Logan (Zac Efron) and Beth (Taylor Schilling) in a scene from the romantic drama
‘The Lucky One,’ which is adapted from a Nicholas Sparks novel.
By Pete Croatto
Weekender Correspondent
An affair to forget
Efron as Logan in the film.
reel attractions
While she is the grand dame, she’s no match
for Marvel.
Who wants to bet they live happily ever
after?
Opening this week:
“The Five-Year Engagement”
“The Pirates! Band of Misfits”
“The Raven”
“Safe”
Coming next week:
“The Avengers”
“The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel”
Rating: W1/2
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GROTTO PIZZA AT HARVEYS LAKE
THE GRAND SLAM SPORTS BAR (639-3278)
ENTERTAINMENT STARTS AT 8:30 ON FRI
Friday, April 27th
Jeanne Zano
GROTTO PIZZA OUTSIDE THE WYOMING VALLEY MALL
THE SKYBOX SPORTS BAR (822-6600)
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT DURING HAPPY HOUR, FRIDAYS 5-7
Wed, April 25th 7-9pm
Gameshow Challenge w/DJ Pete Bayo
Trivia, buzzers, prizes & fun for the over 21!
Fri, April 27th
TEDDY YOUNG
DUO
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weekender
Readers’
Choice 2012
Awards Ceremony:
Wednesday, April 25 @ 8PM
Breaker’s Bar
inside the Mohegan Sun Casino
Entertainment by:
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Elected
officials
2012 Readers’ Choice
winners take office
By Stephanie DeBalko & Amanda Riemensnyder
Weekender Staff Writer & Intern
E
lection? What
election?
The chatter
we’ve been hearing the
past few weeks has been
all about our annual Read-
ers’ Choice poll, where
you, our beloved read-
ers, vote for something
far more important than
the next President of the
United States: Your favor-
ite people and places in
Northeastern Pennsylva-
nia.
Even though The Curse of Sorrow aren’t
rookies when it comes to winning over the
hearts of music fans, the news that it won this
Readers’ Choice award again is still a shock
and something its members will never get used
to.
“It caught us by surprise last year as well,”
said lead guitarist Jay Bones. “We never go into
anything like that thinking we’re going to win.
We kind of just do it.”
Bones confessed that the Readers’ Choice
award is something dear to his heart because of
the people who do the voting.
“It’s the fans who are voting that like you and
come out to see you every week or whenever
they can get out,” he shared. “It’s pretty awe-
some.”
RUNNER-UP: Nowhere Slow
-- A.R.
The award ceremony
will be held Wednesday,
April 25 starting at 8 p.m.
at Breakers inside Mohe-
gan Sun at Pocono Downs
— come help us celebrate
your winners, NEPA. After
all, you were the ones who
voted them into office, so
to speak, this year.
(And just for the record,
we were just joshing when
we said that whole “far
more important” com-
ment.)
Best bar
Bar Louie
RUNNER-UP: R Bar
Best corner bar
Rob’s Pub & Grub
RUNNER-UP: Liam’s
Place
Best college bar
Senunas’ Bar & Grill
RUNNER-UP: Beer Boys
Best dance club
The Woodlands
RUNNER-UP: Scranton
Hardware Bar
Best karaoke night
Ole Tyme Charley’s
RUNNER-UP: Kildare’s
Irish Pub
Best bike night
Outsiders Saloon
RUNNER-UP: Quaker
Steak and Lube
Best Irish bar
Kildare’s Irish Pub
RUNNER-UP: Mulligan’s
Irish Pub
Best sports bar
Lucky’s SportHouse
RUNNER-UP: Beer Boys
Best restaurant
AuRants
RUNNER-UP: Bar Louie
Best new restaurant
Buca Del Vino
RUNNER-UP: Maer’s
BBQ
Best chef
Joe Ginthner, Buca Del
Vino/Ash
RUNNER-UP: Dave
Ciminelli, AuRants
Best restaurant service
Buca Del Vino
RUNNER-UP: Ruth’s
Chris Steak House
Best deli/lunch
The Cafe
RUNNER-UP: Goldstein’s
Deli
Best ice cream
Curly Creme
RUNNER-UP: The Lands
at Hillside Farms
Best bakery
Sanitary Bakery
RUNNER-UP: Bakery
Delite
Best hoagies
Dagwood’s Deli & Subs
RUNNER-UP: Subway
Best burgers
Majestic Lunch
RUNNER-UP: Five Guys
Burgers and Fries
Best hot dogs
Abe’s, South Main Street.
RUNNER-UP: Majestic
Lunch
Best original band
SEEWINNERS P. 36
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Northern Light Espresso Bar
in Scranton may have won best
coffee shop, but coffee is only
part of the equation for co-own-
er Julie Macdowall.
“We have an evolving tea
menu that we change every
month,” said Macdowall, who
has owned the shop with her
husband Darby for the past three
years. “We do salads, wraps and
sandwiches now …And we’re
starting to branch out into the
baking area a little bit.”
Northern Light offers a com-
plete experience.
“People don’t just come
Gino Lispi has been rapping
in Northeastern Pennsylvania
professionally for more than
six years and although he is
proud that he won the first-ever
Readers’ Choice award for best
rapper, the fact that the category
exists is what mostly gets him
pumped up.
“I think that alone is the cool-
est thing,” Lispi said. “There
are so many people rapping, so
I think it’s kind of cool that it
made you guys think it was a
here because they want to have
something to eat, a cup of cof-
fee,” she said. “It’s a comfort-
able place to hang out … We
want to make sure everybody
comes here and they feel like it’s
their place to be, their neighbor-
hood hangout.”
And Macdowall was pleased
to find out about the Readers’
Choice win.
“It’s awesome! I’m so excited
to have been selected.”
RUNNER-UP: Crimson Lion
Hookah Lounge
-- S.D.
Best coffee shop
Best fries
Five Guys Burgers and
Fries
RUNNER-UP: Rob’s Pub
& Grub
Best diner
Eddie’s Diner
RUNNER-UP: Chick’s
Diner
Best desserts
Perkins Family Restaurant
RUNNER-UP: Friendly’s
Best vegetarian-friendly
restaurant
Eden, AVegan Cafe
RUNNER-UP: Canteen
900
Best fine dining
Ruth’s Chris Steak House
RUNNER-UP: Kevin’s Bar
and Restaurant
Best chain restaurant
T.G.I. Friday’s
RUNNER-UP: Red Lob-
ster
Best Chinese restaurant
Peking Chef
RUNNER-UP: Asian Cafe
Best Italian
restaurant
Andy Perugino’s
RUNNER-UP: Leggio’s
Italian Ristorante
Best Japanese/
sushi restaurant
Mirakuya
RUNNER-UP: Katana
Best Mexican
restaurant
La Tolteca
RUNNER-UP: Chicano’s
Best seafood
restaurant
Cooper’s Seafood House
RUNNER-UP: J.J. Banko’s
Seafood
Best steakhouse
Ruth’s Chris Steak House
RUNNER-UP: LongHorn
Steakhouse
Best pizza
Rob’s Pub & Grub
RUNNER-UP: Angelo’s
Pizzeria
Best wings
Kelly’s Pub & Eatery
RUNNER-UP: Andy
Gavin’s Eatery & Pub
Best locally made beer
Lionshead, The Lion
Brewery
RUNNER-UP: Anthracite
Ale, Breaker Brewing
Company
Best martini selection
Arena Bar and Grill
RUNNER-UP: Madison’s
Vodka Bar Steakhouse
Best wine selection
Ruth’s Chris Steak House
RUNNER-UP: Metro Bar
& Grill
Best beer selection, bar/
restaurant
Arena Bar and Grill
RUNNER-UP: Beer Boys
Best beer selection, non-
bar/restaurant
Krugel’s Georgetown Deli
& Beer
RUNNER-UP: Goldstein’s
Deli
Best strip club
Gentlemen’s Club 10
RUNNER-UP: Getaway
Lounge
Best jukebox
The Bog
RUNNER-UP: Beer Boys
Best drink specials
Beer Boys
RUNNER-UP: The V Spot
Best rapper
cool idea.”
Lispi likes to separate him-
self from the competition by
continuing to take risks in his
music career.
“I’m kind of bold when it
comes to track for track,” he
added. “I have always had a
way of going for completely
different vibes. Every song is a
lot different than the last song.”
RUNNER-UP: Rob Petrosky
aka The Rukus
-- A.R.
Best hookah lounge
Crimson Lion Hookah
Lounge
RUNNER-UP: White
Dragon Lounge
Best cover band
M80
RUNNER-UP: The Chatter
Best solo musician/duo
Ronnie Williams
RUNNER-UP: Mike Miz
Best club DJ
DJ MC (Jason McConnell)
RUNNER-UP: DJ Hostile
Hersh
Best large music venue
Toyota Pavilion at Mon-
tage Mountain
RUNNER-UP: Mohegan
Sun Arena
Best club-sized music
venue
River Street Jazz Cafe
RUNNER-UP: Redwood
Art Space
Best open mic
River Street Jazz Cafe
RUNNER-UP: Tommy
Boys
Best TV anchor
Candice Kelly, WBRE
RUNNER-UP: Tom Wil-
liams, WNEP
FROM P. 35
SEEWINNERS P. 38
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Look What
You Missed
The Menzingers at
Redwood Art Space
Photos by: Jason Riedmiller
PROJECT FALLEN
MOTORCYCLE RIDE
First annual Project Fallen ride. This ride is
to benefit any military, law enforcement,
fire/EMS, corrections family or individual
who has “fallen” in the line of duty or
fallen on hard times.
SATURDAY, MAY 5
Registration 10a-12p
Ride begins immediately following
Ride will begin at Jefferson Park
Ride will end at MORGAN HILLS GOLF COURSE
219 Hunlock Harveyville Road
Hunlock Creek PA
Join us after the ride for refreshments and
entertainment
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Best
local blog
When Joey Graziano of Old
Forge realized his passion for
being the first to tell everyone
about new music, his male-tar-
geted lifestyle blog BDP4Life.
blogspot.com was born.
“I said, ‘Well why don’t we
just start up a little website? It’ll
just be music. It’ll be all there
for you, and you can download
it, and I won’t have to make
you any more CDs,’” Graziano
said. “And it started out as just
strictly music, and then it turned
Melanie Boisseau was sur-
prised when she heard the news
that New Visions Studio and
Gallery beat out the competition
for best art gallery. The gallery
initially opened in September
2010 in Taylor and eventually
moved to downtown Scranton.
Boisseau explained that New
Visions is not just your average
art gallery.
Lauren Maga was super
stoked when she found out that
R Bar won the award for best
new bar. R Bar opened in Nanti-
coke in February 2011.
“It’s pretty awesome for only
being here a year,” said Maga,
who was also voted best female
bartender. “I’m very surprised.
It’s pretty cool. You get used to
the bigger places winning and
stuff. It’s cool for a little bar to
win it.”
Not only does R Bar feature
a martini list with an edge, but
it also offers unique food items,
such as the pickle-wrapped hot
dog. Maga stated that R Bar is
constantly evolving and chang-
ing things up.
“We like to do all the beers
that you wouldn’t find in a small
town bar,” she shared. “We have
19 new ones on our beer list,
bottles and drafts.”
RUNNERS-UP: Ash by El
Humidor Cigar Lounge/Estella
Sweet, Twist
-- A.R.
into sports, news, celeb gossip, a
lot of other fun things.”
The name of the blog came
from a saying used by the Old
Forge High School basketball
team expressing “Blue Devil
pride.”
Graziano was thrilled to find
out he won best local blog and
hopes that it will help increase
the blog’s visibility. And as for
the plaque?
“I’m going to take a lot of
pictures. I might carry it around
with me until it fades out.”
RUNNER-UP: MyBeerBuzz.
com
-- S.D.
“We also have music events a
couple times a month,” she said.
“We have art classes for kids
and adults. We have a black-
and-white room, where people
can have classes or just rent out
space. We also rent our own
space, so that anyone can hold
events here.”
RUNNER-UP: AFAGallery
-- A.R.
Best new bar/
Best female bartender
Best art gallery
Best TV weatherperson
Joe Snedeker, WNEP
RUNNERS-UP: (tie) Josh
Hodell, WBRE / Tom
Clark, WNEP
Best radio station
FM 92.1
RUNNER-UP: 98.5 KRZ
Best radio personality
Jeff and Amanda, 98.5
KRZ
RUNNER-UP: Zoey,
97.9X
Best college radio station
88.5 WRKC, King’s Col-
lege
RUNNER-UP: 90.7
WCLH, Wilkes University
Best columnist/writer
Rich Howells, Go Lack-
awanna
RUNNER-UP: Justin
Brown, The Weekender
Best male bartender
Tom Sobieski, Ash by El
Humidor Cigar Lounge
RUNNER-UP: Mark Ma-
son, Hops & Barleys
Best bouncer
Christian Capone, Kil-
dare’s Irish Pub
RUNNER-UP: John Conte,
Scranton Hardware Bar
Best festival/bazaar/
annual event
La Festa Italiana
RUNNER-UP: Pittston
Tomato Festival
Best movie theater
Cinemark
RUNNER-UP: R/C Wil-
kes-Barre Movies 14
Best visual artist
Jessica Smallwood
RUNNER-UP: Leigh
Pawling
Best photographer
Bridget Banik, Top of the
Mountain Photography
RUNNER-UP: Mo Gal-
lagher, Mo Gallagher
Photography
Best tattoo artist
Austina Obscure, Holier
Than Thou Tattoo
RUNNER-UP: Brian An-
tonik, Grave 74
Best theater group
Little Theatre of Wilkes-
Barre
RUNNER-UP: Actors
Circle
Best bookstore
Barnes & Noble Wilkes-
King’s
RUNNER-UP: Books-A-
Million
Best college
King’s College
RUNNER-UP: Wilkes
University
Best hotel
Hilton Scranton Hotel and
Conference Center
RUNNER-UP: Radisson
Lackawanna Station Hotel
Best wedding venue
Genetti Hotel and Confer-
ence Center
RUNNER-UP: The Wood-
lands Inn & Resort
Best place to work
Sundance Vacations
RUNNER-UP: Mohegan
Sun at Pocono Downs
Best ski resort
Elk Mountain Ski Resort
RUNNER-UP: Sno Moun-
tain
FROM P. 36
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Weekender
Readers’
Choice awards,
Wed., April 25,
8 p.m., Breakers
inside Mohegan
Sun at Pocono
Downs
(1280 Route 315,
Plains Twp.)
For almost 14 years, the own-
ers and staff of Twist in Plains
Twp. have been striving to offer
a club atmosphere where patrons
can be free to be themselves.
“We are an alternative
lifestyle bar catering to the
gay community,” said Nik
Hughes, bar manager and DJ.
“There’s something for every-
body, whether you drink or not.
There’s always something to do
at Twist.”
Crystal Phan has been at
Marc’s Tattooing in Plains Twp.
for as long she’s been a piercer.
“Five or six years,” she said.
“Long enough that I don’t
remember how long I’ve been
doing it.”
Phan also helps out at the
shop’s location in Dickson City,
and her dedication to her craft is
admirable.
“I love the reaction people
have after getting pierced,” she
said. “It makes me feel so ac-
This year’s award joins a slew
of past Weekender plaques at
the club, and Hughes attributes
the win to a continuing effort
toward excellence.
“We’re the best at what we
do,” he said. “We’re often imi-
tated but never duplicated, that’s
kind of our motto right now.”
RUNNER-UP: 12 Penny
Saloon
-- S.D.
complished when they look at
their new piercing, and they are
grinning from ear to ear or hug
me — yes, I’ve been hugged
plenty of times!”
She plans on potentially hang-
ing her award for best piercer on
the wall behind the display cases
at the Wilkes-Barre location.
“So then everyone can see
how awesome it is,” she said.
RUNNER-UP: John Holena,
Unity Tattoo Studio
-- S.D.
Best gay bar
Best piercer
Best golf course
Blue Ridge Trail Golf Club
RUNNER-UP: Fox Hill
Country Club
Best gym
Planet Fitness
RUNNER-UP: Core Fit-
ness & Rehab
Best trainer
Tim Hlivia, Leverage Fit-
ness Studio
RUNNER-UP: Donielle
Davidson, Maximum
Health & Fitness
Best yoga/pilates/zumba
studio
Melt Hot Yoga
RUNNER-UP: Balance
Yoga and Wellness
Best bowling alley
Chacko’s Family Bowling
Center
RUNNER-UP: South Side
Bowl
Best exotic dancer (name
& club)
Stacey, Gentlemen’s Club
10
RUNNER-UP: Jezebel,
Gentlemen’s Club 10
Best auto sales, new
Motor World Auto Group
RUNNER-UP: Wyoming
Valley Motors
Best auto sales, used
Feel Good Motors Inc.
RUNNER-UP: Nationwide
Car Sales
Best motorcycle shop
North American Warhorse
RUNNER-UP: Noto’s
Harley-Davidson Shop
Best jeweler
Rainbow Jewelers
RUNNER-UP: MarCo
Jewelers
Best florist
McCarthy Flowers
RUNNER-UP: Robin Hill
Florist
Best garden center
Dundee Gardens
RUNNER-UP: Corky’s
Garden Path Greenhouse
Best record store
Gallery of Sound
RUNNER-UP: Embassy
Vinyl
Best gaming store
GameStop
RUNNER-UP: Wayne’s
World
Best musical instrument
store
Guitar Center
RUNNER-UP: Music Go
Round
Best place to buy a pipe
Utopia Herbal Shop &
Coffee
RUNNER-UP: Primal
Best day spa
Woodhouse Day Spa
RUNNER-UP: Sapphire
Salon & Destination Spa
Best hair salon
Hi-Fi Hair Studio
RUNNER-UP: Sakari
Best nail salon
Rejuve
RUNNER-UP: Queen
Nails
Best tanning salon
Atomic Tan
RUNNER-UP: Tanfastic
Sun Tan Center
Best tattoo/piercing
parlor
Electric City Tattoo Gal-
lery
RUNNER-UP: Art Rage
Tattoo
Best clothing boutique
Bratty Natty’s Boutique
RUNNER-UP: Bettie &
Co.
Best vintage store
My Sister’s Closet
RUNNER-UP: Magpie
Best place to buy acces-
sories
Showroom 56
RUNNER-UP: Charming
Charlie
Best pet store
PetSmart
RUNNER-UP: Petco
Best place to buy lingerie
Mr. Fashions
RUNNER-UP: Mirage
Lingerie
Best adult store
Adult World
RUNNER-UP: Playtime
Boutique
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BRET ALEXANDER
OF THE BADLEES
SWINGS BY
THE STUDIO TO
DISCUSS THE
BAND’S NEW
ALBUM,
“SEE ME AS A
PICTURE - THE
BEST, SO FAR
1990-2012”
102.3-FM The Mountain
Every Sunday
from 8-9 p.m.
LI STEN
TOTHESE
ARTISTS
THIS WEEK
AND PLENTY
MORE
MUSIC
ON THE
MENU
LIVE
WITH ALAN K. STOUT
FACEBOOK.COM/
MUSICONTHEMENU
weekender
7
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0
9
ALSO ON YOUR AM DIAL:
730 AM
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novel approach
S
upernatural fiction is a
genre that’s practically
taken on a life of its
own. From vampires to we-
rewolves and everything in
between, the mythical has
become almost commonplace
by current pop-culture stan-
dards. In his novel “Walker’s
Vale,” NEPA resident John J.
Zelenski aims to turn that
trend on its side by intro-
ducing supernatural forces
through the scope of Chris-
tian ideals.
The first-person account of
James Cooper, “Walker’s
Vale” is the tale of the first
few days of Cooper’s new
life in a country town with
his wife and their 4-year-old
autistic daughter, Liza. The
small Pennsylvania township
is also home to a mysterious
preacher who inspires dis-
trust in the narrator.
From the beginning, the
atmosphere created by Ze-
lenski is one of ominous
uncertainty, and the reader
can’t help but get wrapped
up in his conversational
writing. It also helps that
the book is so short — a
mere 126 pages. There are
lingering questions that don’t
present themselves until the
last page has been turned,
and that’s primarily due to
the speedy pace with which
the plot progresses.
Not that the fast pace is a
bad thing. It’s part of what
makes “Walker’s Vale” such
a page-turner. But the draw-
back to such a quick unrav-
eling of the plot is that the
reader doesn’t really get to
know the characters, espe-
cially the verbally challenged
Liza. She seems to have
something bubbling just un-
der the surface, and with a
little more time, we might
have found out exactly what
that something is.
Zelenski’s writing is clear,
concise and imaginative, and
he quickly builds suspense
with ease. The fork in the
road as far as the reader is
concerned is the religious
message carried with the
plot. There are clues
throughout that point to the
Christian standpoint drum-
ming just beneath the sur-
face, and the largest of
these is the apparent loss of
faith Cooper has experi-
enced. This adds tension to
the plot, since his wife is
still fervently dedicated to
praying and living and
breathing her religion.
At first, these undertones
easily blur with the princi-
ples of paranormal or the
occult, but the book culmi-
nates in a fire-and-brimstone
conclusion that is essentially
a battle between good and
evil. This is where the mate-
rial leans far more toward
the religious than simply the
supernatural, perhaps losing
some readers in its perceived
underlying message. But for
those who are inspired by
tales of miracles and faith,
it doesn’t leave much more
to be desired.
Keeping
the faith
“Walker’s Vale”
by John J. Zelenski
Rating: W W W
By Stephanie DeBalko
Weekender Staff Writer
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theater listings
ACTORS CIRCLE AT
PROVIDENCE PLAYHOUSE
(1256 Providence Rd, Scranton, reser-
vations: 570.342.9707, actorscircle.org)
• “’Night Mother:” May 10-13, 18-20; 8
p.m. Thurs.-Sat.; 2 p.m. Sun. $12/GA,
$10/seniors, $8/students. Discount
tickets preview night May 10, $8/GA,
seniors, students.
BLOOMSBURG THEATRE
ENSEMBLE
(Alvina Krause Theatre, 226 Center St.,
Bloomsburg, 570.784.8181,
800.282.0283, bte.org)
Ticket prices: $9-$25
• “In the Next Room, or The Vibrator
Play:” May 3-20, parental discretion
advised.
DIETRICH THEATRE
(60 E. Tioga Street, Tunkhannock,
570.996.1500, dietrichtheater.com)
• “The Mouse’s Marriage:” April 27, 10
a.m., April 28, 11 a.m. Free, presented
by Dietrich’s Children’s Theater. Tick-
ets at door, call.
HARRIS CONSERVATORY
FOR THE ARTS
(545 Charles St., Luzerne,
570.287.7977, joanharrisdancers.com)
• Corciev, the Grieving Wood:” April
28, 1 p.m., 5 p.m.; April 29, 2 p.m., E.L.
Meyers Auditorium, Wilkes-Barre. $14,
can be purchased at school. Symphon-
ic treatment of rock legends.
HIGHWIRE THEATRE
SCHOOL
(570.947.3484, HighwireTheatreS-
[email protected])
• Introductory Stage Combat Work-
shop: May 5, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Holy Ros-
ary School (312 William St., Scranton).
Learn/enhance skills in stage combat,
theater knowledge. Be prepared for
physical activity, wear appropriate
clothing, stable shoes.
KING’S COLLEGE THEATRE:
(Admin. Bldg., 133 N. River St., Wilkes-
Barre, 570.208.5825)
• Evening of One Act Plays: through
April 26, 7:30 p.m. $1. Students direct,
produce, perform.
• Brown Bag Theatre Series: April 26,
12:40 p.m.; April 25, 12:10 p.m. Free.
One-act plays.
MUSIC BOX PLAYERS
(196 Hughes St., Swoyersville:
570.283.2195 or 800.698.PLAY or
musicbox.org)
• “All Shook Up:” through April 29.
Musical comedy inspired by/featuring
songs of Elvis Presley. Tickets for
dinner and show, show only. Dinner
6:30 p.m., 8 p.m. curtain Fri.-Sat.;
dinner 1:30 p.m. with 3 p.m. curtain
Sun.
• Enrollment open for Music Box
Theatre Academy: Sessions begin May
14. Musical theater workshop for ages
13-20. $275. Perform June 15-17. Learn
techniques in acting, singing, dancing.
Call for enrollment forms.
PENNSYLVANIA THEATER
FOR PERFORMING ARTS
(JJ Ferrara Center, 212 W. Broad St.,
Hazleton, 570.454.5451, ptpashows.org)
• “Steel Magnolias:” Begins May 4,
dinner buffet 90 min. before show.
Show only: $16 adults, $14 seniors/
students 12+, $10 under 12. Dinner/show:
$32 adults, $28 seniors/students, $20
children. Discounts available.
THE PHOENIX
PERFORMING ARTS
CENTER
(409-411 Main St., Duryea, 570.457.3589,
phoenixpac.vpweb.com, phoenix-
[email protected])
• “Rent:” through May 6. Fri.-Sat., 8
p.m. Sun., 2 p.m. $12 ($1/every ticket to
benefit Red Cross AIDS Awareness and
Prevention). April 27 appearance by
Ryan Richardson, Miss Mountain
Laurel. Red Cross and PFLAG will hand
out red ribbons/info to audiences. For
mature audiences. Reservations
recommended, call.
SCRANTON CULTURAL
CENTER
(420 N. Washington Ave., Scranton)
• Ballet Theatre of Scranton’s “Snow
White and the Seven Dwarfs:” May 9, 7
p.m., Scranton Cultural Center (420 N.
Washington Ave.), $20.90-$24.
SHAWNEE PLAYHOUSE
(570.421.5093, theshawneeplay-
house.com)
• “Evening of Comedy: April 27-29,
Fri.-Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. $18/adults,
$10/children, $15/seniors, students.
Meal/theater packages available.
• “Lion in Winter:” May 6, 13, 2 p.m.;
May 4-5, 11-12, 8 p.m. $18/adults, $15/
seniors, $10/children.
❏Auditions:
• “High School Musical Jr.” and
“Aladdin Jr.:” May 6, 2-4 p.m., Shawnee
Inn; May 12, 10 a.m.-noon, Shawnee
Playhouse. 18 years and younger. Be
prepared to sing 16 bars of a song, CD
player available. Bring headshot/
resume.
THE UNIVERSITY OF
SCRANTON
(Royal Theatre of the McDade Center
for Literary and Performing Arts)
• “A Year with Frog and Toad:” April
27-29, May 4-5; Fri.-Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 2
p.m. Ticket prices vary. Call
570.941.4318. W
-- compiled by Amanda
Riemensnyder, Weekender Intern
Send your listings to:
[email protected],
90 E. Market Street Wilkes-Barre
PA18703 or fax to 570.831.7375.
Deadline for publication is
Mondays at 2 p.m. 7
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HAPPY HOUR TUES-SUN 9-11 P.M
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FREE JUKEBOX 10-12
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T
he “Meeting of the Art
Waters” photography
exhibit was supposed to
have already taken place at
Wilkes University in September.
But, in an unfortunate twist of
fate, the exhibit was postponed
due to the devastating flooding
that took place throughout the
area at the time.
Featuring the work of seven
international photographers,
“Meeting of the Art Waters”
(MAW) came to Northeastern
Pennsylvania by way of Cali-
fornia native Jamie Smith, whose
geologist parents would send he
and his two sisters to their
grandparents’ house in Harding
every summer when they’d go
work in the field.
“A big part of my childhood
was here,” he said. “My mother’s
from this area, (and) we’d stay at
the family homestead with my
grandmother, so I spent a lot of
time here.”
After going to school in Santa
Barbara, Calif., Smith moved to
NEPA and was a freelance pho-
tographer for The Times Leader
before moving on to New York,
where he worked for photog-
rapher Jay Maisel, though he
would return often to his family
home with his wife and friends.
While observing a court case in
New York around the time for-
mer Arizona representative Ga-
brielle Giffords was shot last
year, the judge asked everyone to
stand and think about the direc-
tion the country was going in.
“I really thought, ‘Boy, what
direction are we in,’ and why not
come back to an area that I liked
and try and do a project that
benefits the community and
involves them?’ recalled Smith,
who recently moved back to
NEPA fulltime.
From that day in the cour-
troom, “MAW” was born — and
will finally be on display at the
T.W. Shoemaker Art Gallery in
Wyoming April 28-June 30. Ten
percent of sales will benefit the
North Branch Land Trust and
Blue Chip Farms Animal Ref-
uge.
“It was a sense of giving
back,” Smith explained. “It was
a little bit of a business venture,
but more of a community-build-
ing one.”
In addition to Smith, “MAW”
features the work of Zan Turvey
of Charleston, S.C., Geoff Green
and Ashok Sinha of New York
City, Prantik Mazumder of Itha-
ca, N.Y., Penn State University
student Anne-Marie Pietersma of
California and Hugo Sharp of
Brisbane, Australia.
Though the show features the
work of non-local photographers,
there are many local angles:
West Pittston’s iGourmet will
have cheeses at the opening
reception Saturday, April 28
from 4-8 p.m., Marquis Art &
Frame framed the work, the
catalog, which is available for
$25, was printed by Westmore-
land Worldwide in Shavertown
and Plymouth’s Bayard Printing
Group made the postcards.
Like many photography exhib-
its, there is a premise to “MAW,”
but “ours is more trying to be
very inclusive and wide open.
What we tried to do was come
up with five themes that are
pretty broad as far as interpret-
ing,” Smith said.
Each photographer will show
one photo in each topic — ani-
mals, landscapes, people, home-
towns and travel — for a total of
35 photos.
Smith will display a photo of a
chicken, birds on a telephone
wire that “I thought it kind of
looked like sheet music,” two
kids boxing in Thailand and a
cyclist riding down a dusty Cam-
bodian road. While he’s had
many hometowns over the years,
he chose New York for that
category, particularly his former
neighborhood one block south of
Ground Zero.
“It was a Sunday in May, and
the president announced that
Osama Bin Laden had been
killed,” Smith said. “I went out-
side and photographed my
neighborhood before the an-
nouncement, which looked like
it often did — a couple of dogs
and very empty streets, a Sunday
night, not a lot going on. About
an hour later, it was a very dif-
ferent scene.
“That corner where the picture
was taken is the same corner an
acquaintance of mine, Lyle
Owerko, took the cover for Time
magazine from Sept. 11. And
here I am, nine years later, and
it’s a celebratory scene, which
was eerie.”
Smith got into photography
“by accident” and didn’t have a
camera until he was a sopho-
more in college, where he “had a
great professor who gave us a
really long leash, as long as we
were willing to work hard and
ask questions with the pictures
we take.” When he moved here
and became a freelance photog-
rapher, he found a welcome
change.
“I really liked it. Where I grew
up, it was Silicone Valley, a lot
of money, a lot of technology,
and out here, it’s a little different,
a lot of ethnicities, a lot of bor-
oughs and church festivals, so to
me, that was interesting,” he
shared.
But what was most interesting
to the photographer was his lack
of walls.
“One of the things that drew
me to photography as a profes-
sion when I lived here (the first
time) was my office was wherev-
er they sent me,” he said. “One
day it could be sports, one day it
could be politics — it was al-
ways different, and it was new to
me. It was a way to explore
some world that I didn’t have
access to before.” W
“Meeting of the Art Waters” photography exhibit, April 28-June 30,
T.W. Shoemaker Art (312 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming). Opening reception
Sat., April 28, 4-8 p.m., RSVP on website. Portion of proceeds benefit
North Branch Land Trust and Blue Chip Farms Animal Refuge.
Info: meetingoftheartwaters.com
This photo of the Santa Monica Pier by Anne-Marie Pietersma will be part of ’Meeting
of the Art Waters.’
Different perspectives,
one show
By Nikki M. Mascali
Weekender Editor
This Geoff Green photo was taken in Harding in 2010.
‘Charlie Parkers on a Wire’ by Jamie Smith, who
recently moved back to NEPA.
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Weekender/Mountaingrown
Original Music Series
SUPPORTING LOCAL MUSIC
... LIKE NEVER BEFORE
WEDNESDAY
5/16/12
at the Woodlands
no cover
Performance by:
Drew Kelly
Live radio broadcast from 10-11 p.m.
on 102.3-FM, The Mountain
Hosted by Alan K. Stout
weekender
Mountaingrown Music
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dish
By Nikki M. Mascali
Weekender Editor
SWEETS IN THE RAW
Natural Chef Toby Landon
will host a raw desserts class
Sunday, April 29 from 1-3 p.m.
at Thrive Wellness Center
(647 Wyoming Ave., Kingston).
Raw foodism (or rawism)
consist of foods — fruits, vege-
tables, nuts, seeds and sprouted
grains — not heated above 112
degrees, which allows the food
to keeps its enzymes, thus re-
sulting in a higher nutrient
value than cooked foods.
Landon will demonstrate how
to make healthy and delicious
desserts like pies, fudge and
puddings using fresh fruits,
nuts and more at the class.
Cost to attend is $50 and
attendees need to register and
pay by Thursday, April 26. For
more info, call 570.283.0111.
TAKE A TASTE
Geneva Christian School’s
7th annual “Taste of the Val-
ley” will be held Wednesday,
May 2 from 5:30-8 p.m. at
Fiorelli’s Catering (1560 Main
St., Peckville). Rock 107’s
morning-show hosts DiRienzo
and Prospector are this year’s
honorary chairs.
“Taste of the Valley” features
samplings from numerous local
eateries, basket raffles and a
silent auction with items like a
full set of braces, a pool, a year
membership to UNO Fitness
and more up for grabs. Partici-
pating restaurants include
A.J.’s Club Soda, Applebee’s,
Fratelli’s Pizza & Pasta
House, Kutsop’s Olde World
Market, Longworth’s Family
Restaurant, Main Street Ba-
gel, Red Robin, Sweet Obses-
sions by Amber, Tastefully
Simple and Texas Roadhouse.
Tickets are $15 for adults in
advance or $20 at the door;
tickets for children under 12 are
$5. All proceeds benefit The
Geneva School, NEPA’s only
classical Christian school,
which provides advanced aca-
demic classes for students
pre-K through eighth grade. For
tickets or more info, call
570.489.7620 or visit geneva-
school.org.
PIZZA GETS ‘COOL’
Looks like pizza is more than
just something to eat cold for
breakfast (I’m not the only one
who likes it even more the next
day, am I?) as Friendly’s re-
cently introduced its newest
yummy treat: Ice cream pizza.
Sure, like its cheesy counter-
part, this pizza, too, is chewy
and covered in tasty toppings,
but Friendly’s version features a
brownie crust topped with va-
nilla ice cream, fudge, choco-
late chips and sprinkles. What’s
not to love?
Friendly’s products are avail-
able at local supermarkets and
Friendly’s restaurants, which
can be found in NEPA at 778
Kidder St., Wilkes-Barre, 564
Susquehanna Blvd., Hazle Twp.
and 708 N. Blakely St., Dun-
more.
For more info, visit friendlys-
.com.
A ‘PINNACLE’ PURCHASE
Can you put a price on vod-
ka? According to reports earlier
this week, yes, a price of more
than $600 million.
Beam Inc., the maker of Jim
Beam bourbon, Courvoisier
cognac, Sauza tequila and
more, purchased Pinnacle
vodka and Calico Jack rum
from Maine-based White Rock
Distilleries Inc. — cash.
Pinnacle, one of the largest
imported vodka brands in the
U.S., offers 29 flavors of vodka,
including Atomic Hots, cake,
espresso, cookie dough, marsh-
mallow and several variations
of Whipped.
According to a report from
The Wall Street Journal Mon-
day, “bourbon, vodka and pre-
mixed drinks are expected to
continue to outperform the
overall spirits category because
these categories have seen more
innovation, analysts say,” and
flavored vodkas account for
more than a quarter of all top-
brand vodka sales.
I don’t know about you, but I
love me some flavored vodka
and recently tried Pinnacle’s
Atomic Hots and thought it was
fantastic. When Beam acquired
reality-TV star Bethenny
Frankel’s Skinnygirl last year,
the margarita brand grew in
leaps and bounds, so it’ll be
interesting to see what Beam
has in store for Pinnacle. W
Send your food and drink
news to
[email protected]
or call 570.831.7322.
Fruits and nuts will be at the center of a raw dessert
class held at Thrive Wellness Center.
How good does this
dessert pizza from
Friendly’s look?
Beam Inc. just bought
Pinnacle vodka and Calico
Jack for more than $600
million.
ELMER SUDDS
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829-7833
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Kitchen & Bar Hours:
Sunday - Monday 5pm- 2am
Tuesday - Saturday 4pm- 2am
Serving Great Burgers, Wings, Salads, Pizza, Seafood and more
Tuesdays: Spaghetti &Meatballs for $5.95
11 Seasonal Beers On Tap • 70 Plus Beers To Choose From
WILKES-BARRE’S ORIGINAL BEER BAR SINCE 1992.
WEDNESDAY:
ROBB BROWNANDFRIENDS at 9:30pm
TUESDAY:
SANDYPANTS at 9:30pm
NewMenu Items!
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BAR & RESTAURANT
KEVIN’S
CONGRATULATIONS
to all of the winners.
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Melissa

s
Mouth
WITH KRZ’S LISSA -
MELISSA KRAHNKE
A NEW WEEKLY
WEEKENDER
FEATURE COMING
TO YOU NEXT
WEDNESDAY!
S
ometimes people do things to
get recognition, and some-
times they do things simply
because they care. For the latter, it
doesn’t matter if anyone notices
that they made a difference, it just
matters that the difference was
made.
Talking with two of the honorees
of the 2012 Northeastern Penn-
sylvania RainbowAwards, present-
ed by the Northeastern Pennsylva-
nia RainbowAlliance, it became
clear where their motives lay.
“I certainly don’t do my work so
that I receive awards,” said Rabbi
Daniel Swartz of Temple Hesed in
Scranton, who was the first to
performa same-sex wedding cere-
mony for the organization. “But the
work that I do and trying to make
the faith community here more
welcoming of the LGBT(Lesbian,
Gay, Bisexual and Transgender)
community is very important to
me, and it’s nice to have it recog-
nized.”
His recognition comes in the
formof the award for Outstanding
Supportive Clergyperson. Another
honoree, Susan E. Smith, is a for-
mer RainbowAlliance chair who
will receive the award for Out-
standing Service to the Rainbow
Alliance.
“I amobviously touched and
delighted about receiving it,” Smith
said. “It’s certainly not something I
expected. It’s been my pleasure
having served on the board for the
last five years, so to be recognized
for it is lovely.”
Swartz and Smith, along with
three other recipients, will be cele-
brated at an awards gala Saturday,
April 28 at the Radisson Lacka-
wanna Station in Scranton. This is
the second year the formal award
ceremony is being held, and the
RainbowAwards were originally
created to celebrate the contribu-
tions of those who’ve made a sig-
nificant impact in or for the local
LGBTcommunity. The benefits of
such an event are countless.
“One of our core beliefs with the
organization is providing visibility
and accurate representation of the
community to improve under-
standing and acceptance,” said
John Dawe, executive director of
the RainbowAlliance. “And by
doing an awards gala, which is very
visible, that helps with
that.
“It allows us to bring
together different groups
throughout the commu-
nity that are working
toward a common goal.
And it also is a fundrais-
er for us to fund some of
the important programs
and work that we’re
doing. And it’s a good
time.”
The other programs
include the annual NE-
PAPrideFest and the
NEPASafeZone Project.
“I amdeliriously
happy that we have worked very
hard, put together a community
coalition and gotten the SafeZone
launched,” said Smith. “(It) is the
once-a-month support group meet-
ing for LGBTand questioning kids.
So I amabsolutely looking forward
to seeing that growand thrive.”
Even though Smith won’t be a
chair anymore, she plans to remain
a board member and stay involved
with the RainbowAlliance. Mov-
ing forward, Swartz also wants to
continue working toward accept-
ance.
“The thing that I would love to
see more of is to have more of my
colleagues in the clergy in this area
be comfortable talking about these
issues and bringing the possibility
of openness to the LGBTcommu-
nity to their own congregations,” he
shared.
All of the recipients were nomi-
nated for the awards, and the board
of the RainbowAlliance narrowed
down the pool. Dawe noted that the
categories for the awards aren’t the
same every year and vary based on
the work and individuals that stand
out.
The other honorees are: Twist
Bar &Nightclub (Outstanding
Business), Patty Tomaszewski,
(Outstanding Community Volun-
teer/Leader) and Shay Neary (Out-
standing Student Leader).
“There are a lot of things wrong
that you can complain about, but
it’s nice every nowand then to try to
celebrate what’s going on that’s
good,” Swartz said. W
NEPA Rainbow Awards Gala,
April 28, 5-11 p.m., Radisson
Lackawanna Station Hotel (700
Lackawanna Ave., Scranton).
$75, $50/students. Pre-regis-
ter only, visit rainbowaward-
s.org.
Focusing
on the good
By Stephanie DeBalko
Weekender Staff Writer
Rabbi Daniel Swartz will receive the Rainbow Award for
Outstanding Supportive Clergyperson.
Susan E. Smith will receive the
award for Outstanding Service to
the Rainbow Alliance.
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No need to dress sloppy - or in your grandma’s plaid pants -
on the course anymore.
Style files
By Rachel A. Pugh
Weekender General Manager
I
have recently taken up the game of
golf. And by taking it up I mean I
have clubs, spikes, a glove, Penn
State tees, and I have hit the course
once. But the season has just begun,
and I am looking forward to a summer of
perfecting my swing and excelling at putting.
For now, I’m happy to be making contact
with the ball.
I’m not going to lie. Part of the excitement
of this sport is all the accessories. It may
sound silly, but it’s fun to pick out a bag for
your clubs. Do you choose a brightly colored
one or is that too obnoxious? Do you go for
the more-subdued hues or is that insanely
boring? I personally made my decision
based off colors I figured I would wear on
the course. And now with a pink, black
and white bag, I think I’m on my way to
coordinating my golfing wardrobe.
After receiving a pair of black Nike
spikes for Easter from my fiance, my wheels
started turning as I could then begin to see
my golfing ensemble assemble. I can now
match my spikes with a black hat or visor
and choose whites and pink for my actual
clothing. My golfing fanatic better-half
also picked up a golfing glove for me. It’s
white — perfect to marry with my color-
coordinated vision.
Don’t dress sub par
Laugh if you will, but I honestly feel I
will play better if I’m dressed appropriately
and in style. Apair of jeans and a T-shirt
won’t allow my body to move the same
way clothes designed for golfing will. And
if looking good while concentrating on
chipping the ball helps, I’m spending a lot of
time primping before I get out there. Besides,
if I feel like a slob, a mismatched bundle of
whatever I have pulled from my closet, well,
I’m defeated before I even begin. Since golf
is already a difficult enough sport, I don’t
want to hinder my potential.
Although the game of golf can result in
being pretty expensive, after purchasing the
clubs, you really don’t have to go overboard
with picking the right attire. Since I am
leaning toward the pink, black and white
colors, I can pretty much buy three or four
pairs of shorts or skirts and do the same with
the tops. I’ll vary the two every time I play,
and it will look like an entirely different
outfit every time. Ingenious, I know.
So who cares if I might be excited
about playing dress up before each golf
outing? Once I get out there, the mental
materialism will fade, and it’s just me and
my ridiculously competitive spirit driving the
ball toward the hole. It’s just nice to know
I’ll look good while doing it.. W
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sorry mom&dad
By Justin Brown
Weekender Correspondent
M
any moons ago, the
Olympic Games were
originated in ancient
Greece. It is known that the
ancient Greeks idealized phys-
ical fitness and mental dis-
cipline, believing excellence
in those areas honored Zeus,
the greatest of all its gods.
After many storms of earth,
wind and fire, the Olympic
Games have remained a solid
reminder of greatness.
Recently, a group of Temple
University freshmen called
upon me to help them follow
in the footsteps of the ancient
Greeks by thriving for excel-
lence in what matters most to
them: Drinking beer! Tribute
was paid in an event known as
the Beer Olympics.
Like a birthday clown for
drunk college students, I ac-
cepted the duty of hosting the
event. However, instead of
making them balloon animals,
I made them funnel beers and
puke. Thug life!
Among the daring were
Special Bill, Sunny, T
Strobes, M&M, Tom Bro,
Bardo, G Money, Uncle Gio-
vanni, Maverick, Wet Shirt,
@JGrinavich and Blackout.
When I started the ceremo-
ny by having the participants
recite an oath, giggles spit out
of Bardo’s mouth. Realizing
someone in the bunch wasn’t
as used to honoring tradition
during drinking events as a
veteran frat boy, I started
questioning whether or not
these boys could handle
drinking like men. Inviting
someone like me to host such
an event without it turning
into an extravagant production
is like inviting a porn star to
your bedroom just to talk.
Once the events began, how-
ever, I was genuinely im-
pressed.
Through events that in-
cluded bobbing for beer bot-
tles in a grimy bathtub, a
blindfolded beer-tasting chal-
lenge, a beer can toss, drunk-
food eating competition, act-
ing out a public service an-
nouncement on the dangers of
underage drinking and beer
trivia, I realized not only did
these little shits put the
“fresh” in freshmen, but they
were admirably disciplined
and focused. Not once did
they get distracted by the
huge hickey on M&M’s neck
the size of a tumor-stricken
testicle.
By the end of the night
everyone was an MVP in their
own right, all deserving their
own cardboard Burger King
crown — especially Blackout,
who proved puking like the
girl from “The Exorcist” is
funnier than it is scary. Un-
fortunately, crowns weren’t in
the budget.
Sorry, Mom & Dad … for
making a personal appearance
at an underage drinking party.
But hey, since nobody got
pregnant, did it even really
happen at all? W
Beer
Olympics
Justin is still the frattiest frat boy.
C
ome this weekend, needles
will gleam, colored ink
will vanish by the gallon
and every volt in the “Electric
City” will work overtime breath-
ing life into an industrial-strength
army of buzzing tattoo machines.
It’s back. Friday-Sunday, April
27-29 marks the return of the
Electric City Tattoo Convention,
now in its third year. Skin ’n’ ink
enthusiasts will have the opportu-
nity to pack their kaleidoscopic
bods into the Hilton Scranton
Hotel and Conference Center and
peruse the work of artists from as
far away as Utah and South Car-
olina.
“We bring in artists from all
over the country,” organizer Mi-
chael “Woody” Wodock ex-
plained. “All tattooers have dif-
ferent styles, so even if you
haven’t found someone locally
whose style you like, there’s
something for you here. If you’re
flirting with an idea, you can stop
by and look around and find
someone who can do what you’re
looking for.”
In addition to the rows of artist
booths for tattoo fans to browse,
human canvases and the artists
who illustrate them alike will
have the chance to show off, and
maybe walk away with bragging
rights, through contests like Best
Sleeve and Best Back Piece,
among others.
In the interest of keeping the
event family-friendly, there will
also be contests of a more light-
hearted nature, including one for
hula-hooping and another for pie
eating. Magicians and jugglers
will be on hand to provide all-
ages entertainment, and vendors
will offer wares ranging from
Japanese art prints and hand-
crafted jewelry to vegan-friendly
soaps and body lotions.
One big difference from last
year’s event, however, means that
bands will no longer be perform-
ing at the convention itself. In-
stead, live music will be reserved
for post-con after-parties, with
The Invisible Swordsmen at The
Keys on Friday and Coal Town
Rounders at The Bog on Sat-
urday.
“We’ve learned what people
are looking for as far as enter-
tainment, and we know what the
artists expect from us,” Wodock
said. “The artists have high ex-
pectations because they’ve had
such a great time in the past two
years. It’s a smaller show com-
pared to other tattoo conventions,
but they like that. It’s has a com-
fortable, personable feeling. They
come out, and they get to know
people from the area, and they’ve
made friends over the years.”
Bruce Fairchild will be there.
A tattoo artist with 15 years of
experience behind him, Fairchild
owns and operates Triple 6 Tat-
toos in Wilkes-Barre. Though he
once attended as many as 20
conventions a year, that number
is now limited to just the Scran-
ton event.
A big reason for that is not
simply because of the friendships
he’s made there or the good times
to be had. For Fairchild, the big-
gest thing the Electric City Tat-
too Convention offers is excep-
tional standards.
“There are new tattoo shops
opening up and closing down
every day,” he said. “People think
they can be a tattoo artist because
they can draw a straight line. Not
true.
“I’m basically a self-taught
artist, but I had to do a lot of
research before I ever picked up
a tattoo machine: Classes, semi-
nars, learning about skin and
health-regulation standards.
There’s so much to it that a lot of
people these days have no idea
about.”
Having attended both of the
previous years’ events, Fairchild
has become something of an
Electric City con regular. It’s a
tradition he has no interest in
ending anytime soon.
“I will absolutely keep doing
this convention as long they keep
having it,” he said. “They care a
lot about the artists they have
there. They don’t just let anybody
in. They’re not just trying to
make money.” W
Electric City Tattoo Conven-
tion, Fri., April 27, 3 p.m.-11
p.m., Sat., April 28, noon–11
p.m., Sun., April 29, noon–8
p.m., Hilton Scranton Hotel
and Conference Center (100
Adams Ave.). $15 single day,
$25 two days, weekend $40.
Info: electriccitytattooconven-
tion.com
Convention gets
artists, tattoo fans
buzzing
By Bill Thomas
Weekender Correspondent
Brian Nardella gets a tattoo from Smivee Valencia.
Andy Blair tattoos Pete
Farrell at a past Electric
City Tattoo Convention.
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(570)820-7691 97 Oxford St. Hanover Twp. Pa 18706
Find us on Facebook • facebook.com/atonementtattoo
$20 Basic Body Piercings - $40 Micro-Dermals
$400 ALL DAY SITTINGS
Freehand Style • Creative Micro Dermals
Specializing In Creative Cover-Ups
Custom Art Work • Private Booths
Delicate & Bold Line Designs • Restorations
Relaxing Environment
Gift Certificates Available
Credit Cards Accepted • Red Cross Certified
Hospital Style Sterilization
Single Use Pre-Sterilized Needels
Topical Numbing Gel Available
CUSTOMIZED BODY MODIFICATIONS • APPOINTMENTS &WALKINS WELCOME
$10 OFF
ANY TATTOO OR BODY PIERCING
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speak and see
POETIC
Anthology Books (515 Center
St., Scranton, above Outrageous,
570.341.1443, scrantholo-
[email protected]) All events free,
unless otherwise noted.
❏ Writing Groups
• Open writers group: Sat., noon led
by KK Gordon and Leslee Clapp.
Bring piece of original writing to
discuss and critique.
Barnes & Noble Wilkes-
King’s Booksellers (7 S. Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.208.4700)
❏ Events/Book Clubs:
• Open Mic Night: last Tues. of every
month, 6:30 p.m.
• Writer’s Workgroup: Wyoming
Valley Wordsmiths: first/third Tues.
monthly, 7 p.m.
❏ Children’s Events:
• Weekly Sat. morning story time, 11
a.m.-noon.
Dietrich Theater (60 E. Tioga
St., Tunkhannock: 570.996.1500)
• Writers Group: Thurs., 7-8:30 p.m.
Celebrates all types of writing styles,
formats. Join anytime. Free. Call to
register.
JimThorpe Arts in Motion
(434 Center St., Jim Thorpe,
570.483.8640, jtartsinmotion.com)
• Sip & Sketch, a night of informal
life drawing for artists/doodlers: May
6, 7-10 p.m., 21+, BYOB. Bring art
supplies and beverage of choice,
JTAIM will provide live (fully clothed)
models/light refreshments. $10 at
door.
Lackawanna Historical So-
ciety (The Catlin House, 232 Mon-
roe Avenue, Scranton, 570.344.3841)
• Robert F. Harris Lecture: April 29,
2 p.m. Author of “The Last Dispatch
Rider.” Open to public.
Osterhout Library (71 S. Fran-
klin St., Wilkes-Barre,
570.821.1959)
• Franklin Street Sleuths: April 26,
6:30 p.m. Mystery book discussion of
“Instruments of Darkness” by Imo-
gen Robertson. Light refreshments.
• Just For the Record: April 30,
6-7:30 p.m. Bring vinyl records to
share, discuss.
• Women’s Writer Discussion: May 1,
15, 6:30 p.m. Free, call to register.
Pittston Memorial Library
(47 Broad St., 570.654.9565, pitmem-
[email protected])
• Crochet Club: Tues. 10 a.m.-noon,
Thurs. 6-7:45 p.m., 12+, registration
required. Participants bring their
own crochet hook, yarn. Call, stop to
register.
• Basic Computer Class for Adults:
Mon., 10:30 a.m. Call to register.
• The Friends Meetings: 4th Thurs.
of month, 6:30 p.m. New members
always welcome.
• Toddler and Preschool Story Time:
Call to register.
Plymouth Public Library (107
W. Main St., Plymouth, 570.779.4775)
• “Paddlemania” Fundraiser: April
27, doors 5 p.m., event 6-9 p.m.,
American Legion (33 Center Ave.,
Plymouth). $5/adults, call for tickets.
Bearfoot Books, Scentsy, Tastefully
Simple, more. Food, games, refresh-
ments.
University of Scranton
• Donations Sought for Weinberg
Memorial Library’s annual spring
book/plant sale. All used titles;
hardcover, paperback, children’s
books, cookbooks, fiction, non-
fiction. Videos, CDs, cassettes, re-
cords, tag sale items. Drop-off boxes
on Monroe Ave. side of Library until
April 25. Info: 570.941.4078.
• Annual Spring Book Sale: April 28,
9 a.m.-9 p.m.,
April 29, noon-4
p.m., fifth floor
Heritage Room, Weinberg Memorial
Library. Book prices start $1. Flower-
ing plants, tag sale items. Proceeds
benefit Friends of Weinberg Memorial
Library Endowment. Preview sale
April 27, for Friends,’ Schemel Forum
members. Info: 570.941.4078.
VISUAL
AFA Gallery (514 Lackawanna
Ave., Scranton: 570.969.1040 or
Artistsforart.org)
Gallery hours Thurs.-Sat., 12-5 p.m.
• Life Drawing sessions: every Mon.,
7-9 p.m. Contact [email protected]
ski.com for info.
• Drawing Socials: Sun., 6-9 p.m. $5
GA, $2 student.
• Ashley Gries Exhibit for Keystone
College Senior Exhibition: through
April.
ArtWorks Gallery (502 Lacka-
wanna Ave., Scranton. 570.207.1815,
artworksnepa.com)
Gallery hours: Tues.-Fri., 11 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Sat., noon-3 p.m., or by appointment.
• Rising Artists from Keystone
College Senior Exhibition: through
April 28. Graphic design, sculpture,
ceramics, blown glass, book arts.
The Butternut Gallery &
Second Story Books (204
Church St, 2nd Floor, Montrose)
April hours: Thurs.-Sat., 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
• “Better Enjoyed than Hidden:
Collector’s Work at Butternut Gal-
lery:” through May 12. Paintings,
sculptures, jewelry, pottery from art
collectors.
Dietrich Theatre (downtown
Tunkhannock, 570.996.1500)
• Paintings by Ali Woods Wilson/Ben
Jackson; Titanic Memorabilia from
Ryan Holdredge/Mike Morin:
through April. Fourth Friday
Reception with all
exhibitors April 27,
5-8 p.m.
Gal-
lery at the
Pocono Com-
munity Theater
(88 S. Courtland St., East
Stroudsburg, 570.421.3456. pocono-
communitytheater.org)
• “Wild About Flowers: through June
17. Front gallery, Andrea Robbins-
Rimberg. Reception April 28, 1-3 p.m.
• “Vacation Time:” through June 17.
Back gallery, Penny Ross. Reception
April 28, 1-3 p.m.
Hope Horn Gallery (Hyland Hall,
University of Scranton, 570.941.4214)
Gallery Hours: Sun.-Fri., noon-4 p.m.;
Wed., 6-8 p.m.
• “The Visiting Nurse Association of
Scranton: One Hundred Years:”
through May 4. Free during gallery
hours.
The Linder Gallery at Keys-
tone College (570.945.8335,
keystone.edu/lindergallery)
• Bill Tersteeg and Students exhibi-
tion (ceramics): through April 29.
Marquis Art and Frame (515
Center St., Scranton, 570.344.3313)
• Marywood University Student
Invitational Exhibition: through May 1.
Select students will exhibit their
work using varied media.
• Denise Thomas Artist Exhibit
“Living in Colour:” May 4, reception
6-8:30 p.m., wine/refreshments. Free
to the public.
Marquis Art & Frame (122 S.
Main St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.823.0518)
Gallery hours Mon.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
• Trio Manifesto-selected works by
Mark Maglioli, Sue Obaza, Bernadette
Harrison: through April 28, Second
floor gallery.
Meeting of the Art Waters
(meetingoftheartwaters.com)
• An exhibit by seven international
photographers, April 28-June 30 at
T.W. Shoemaker Art (312 Wyoming
Ave., Wyoming). Opening reception
April 28, 4-8 p.m., ft. wines and
cheese, Q&A; RSVP on website. Por-
tion of proceeds benefit North
Branch Land Trust and Blue Chip
Farms Animal Refuge.
New Visions Studio & Gal-
lery (201 Vine St., Scranton,
www.newvisionstudio.com,
570.878.3970)
Gallery hours: Tues.-Sun., noon-6 p.m.
and by appointment.
• Group Exhibit / Independent Artist
Collective and Scranton High stu-
dents: through April 27.
Pauly Friedman Art Gallery
(Misericordia University,
570.674.6250, misericordia.edu/art)
Gallery Hours: Mon. closed, Tue.-
Thurs. 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Fri. 10 a.m.-5
p.m., Sat.-Sun. 1-5 p.m.
• Works of Nina Davidowitz, Skip
Sensbach, Leigh Pawling: through
April 29.
• Verve Vertu Art Exhibit/Reception:
May 3, 5-8 p.m., 2nd floor John J.
Passan Hall, lower campus. Reserva-
tions recommended, “Exceptional
Art-Exceptional Artists,” artists from
Deutsch Institute’s Verve Vertu Art
Studio. Info: 674.8255, [email protected]
sericordia.edu
Pocono Arts Council (18 N.
Seventh St., Stroudsburg.
570.476.4460. www.poconoarts.org)
• PoconoArts Squared: Artists/
craftsmen invited to set up booth to
sell work along Main St., Seventh St.,
around Courthouse Square. $25/
members, $35/non-members. Contact
[email protected]
Schulman Gallery (2nd floor of
LCCC Campus Center, 1333 S. Pros-
pect St., Nanticoke, www.luzerne.edu/
schulmangallery, 570.740.0727)
Gallery hours: Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
• “The Sketch Book Exhibit:”
through April 26. Pencil, ink, char-
coal, covered pencil, marker drawing,
sketches from local artists, students.
STAR Gallery at the Mall at
Steamtown (570.969.2537/
343.3048)
• “With Hearts On Our Sleeves:” May
4-31. Opening May 4, 6-9 p.m., art
making with people from The Aaron
Counseling Center. Refreshments,
live music.
Suraci Gallery (Marywood Uni-
versity, 570.348.6211 x 2428, mary-
wood.edu/galleries.)
Gallery hours: Mon., Thurs.-Fri., 9
a.m.-4 p.m.; Tues.-Wed., 9 a.m.-8 p.m.;
Sat.-Sun., 1-4 p.m.
• Peter Hoffer: Out of the Block
-Recent Prints and Collage: through
May 5.
The Vintage Theater (119 Penn
Avenue, Scranton, 570.589.0271,
www.scrantonsvintagetheater.com)
Gallery hours: Wed., 6 p.m.-midnight;
Thurs.-Sat., noon-6 p.m.
• 2nd Annual Rhythm of The Region:
May 4-31, seeking submissions. Any
medium that reflects passion/history
of local music scene. E-mail photos
of work and/or description, artist
bio, contact info to [email protected]
vintagetheater.com, 119 Penn Ave,
Scranton PA, 18503. Digital preferred.
Deadline April 27.
Widmann Gallery (Located in
King’s College’s Sheehy-Farmer
Campus Center between North Fran-
klin and North Main Streets, Wilkes-
Barre, 570.208.5900, ext. 5328)
Gallery hours: Mon. through Fri. 9
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Free and open to
the public.
• 24th Annual King’s Student Exhibi-
tion: through May 4. Works by King’s
students in mass communication,
sculpture, drawing classes. W
-- compiled by Amanda
Riemensnyder, Weekender
Intern
Send your listings to:
[email protected],
90 E. Market Street
Wilkes-Barre PA18703 or fax to
570.831.7375. Deadline for
publication is Mondays at 2 p.m.
P
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Had an encounter with someone famous? If so, the Weekender wants
your pictures for our Starstruck.
It doesn’t matter if it happened five months ago or five years ago. Send
us your photo, your name, hometown, the celebrity you met, and when
and where you met them, and we’ll run one photo here each week. E-mail
high resolution JPEGs to [email protected], or send your
photos to Starstruck, c/o The Weekender, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA,
18703.
starstruck
Norman McKenney of White Haven with "The Walk-
ing Dead" comic-book writer Robert Kirkman at
New York Comic Con in October 2011
ralphie report
the
By Ralphie Aversa
Special to the Weekender
H
ot Chelle Rae seems
pleasantly surprised at
how well its career
continues to progress.
“It’s everything that we
thought it would be, but it’s
also surprising at the same
time,” lead singer Ryan Fol-
lese told me backstage at
Philadelphia’s Theatre of the
Living Arts over the week-
end, where the band was on
one of the many sold-out
stops of the “Beautiful
Freaks” tour. “To be able to
have this job and have it take
us to the places we’re going,
it’s incredible.”
Case in point: HCR recently
wrapped a tour through Aus-
tralia and New Zealand sup-
porting fellow Nashville mu-
sician Taylor Swift. Follese
said the band and Swift sim-
ply had one of “those mo-
ments.”
“We were on this boat with
Taylor, and we were all just
sitting there, trolling about in
Sydney Harbor,” the frontman
recalled. “I was actually
standing next to Taylor, and I
was like, ‘This job is amaz-
ing.’”
Swift concurred.
“As big as she is, she
knows, too,” Follese said.
“The fans are unreal. This
whole thing is just incred-
ible.”
Guitarist Nash Overstreet
used similar adjectives to
describe the tour itself.
“They’re very, very polite
and welcoming,” Overstreet
noted of the band’s New Zeal-
and fans. “They’re stoked that
you’re in their country, they’re
stoked that you’re playing.”
But the fans overseas didn’t
just make HCR feel welcome
by acting as tour guides dur-
ing the day, or using “please”
and “thank you” when asking
for photos.
“They knew every word to
every song, not just the sin-
gles,” Overstreet said. “It
gives us a validation of songs
we wrote that haven’t been on
the radio yet and to see them
fall in love with those is real-
ly cool.”
Hot Chelle Rae has charted
two tracks from “Whatever”
on pop radio and a third could
be on the way with “Honest-
ly,” a breakup anthem with a
music video that features
“Pretty Little Liars” star
Ashley Benson.
“I think somebody from a
show like that is always a
really cool edge to add to the
video,” Follese said of her
role as his eventual ex-girl-
friend. “We reached out to
her, and she was down to do
it.”
Of course, it wasn’t that
simple. The actress was get-
ting ready to shoot a movie,
and HCR was on tour. All
parties involved found one
24-hour window to film. The
final piece took 17 hours.
Benson left after for her mo-
vie, HCR flew to Australia
the next day.
“It was pretty much killing
us, in a great way,” Overstreet
recalled. “We had a blast
shooting the video, but when
we got to Australia we just
dropped.” W
Listen to “The Ralphie
Radio Show” weeknights
from 7 p.m.-midnight on 97
BHT.
Ralphie with Hot Chelle Rae.
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o
m
Mon & Tues Noon-6 PM
Wed-Thurs-Fri Noon-8 PM
Sat 10 AM-4 PM
• Sexy Lingerie
• Fantasy Wear
• Thigh Highs • Stockings
• Packaged Lingerie
• Leather & Vinyl
• Romance Enhancement
Essentials
Route 6, Scranton-Carbondale Highway
Exit 191A off I-81 • 570-489-7448
Gift Certificates
Available
M
ira
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The Romance Store For Couples!






theweekender.com
weekender
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CAR & BIKE EVENTS
Coal Cracker Cruisers Car
Club
• Cruise Nights at Advance Auto (Rt.
6, Carbondale): May 4, June 1, July 6,
Aug. 3, Sept. 7, 6-9 p.m. Food, music,
door prizes, 50/50, trophies. Food by
Boy Scout Troop 888. Info:
570.876.4034
Gunners PA Law Enforce-
ment MC (gunnerspa-
[email protected], $20/rider, $10/
passenger unless noted otherwise)
• Project Fallen Ride: May 5, regis-
tration 10 a.m.-noon. Begins/ends
Jefferson Park, Pittston, ends Out-
siders, Wilkes-Barre. Benefits individ-
uals, families of law enforcement,
corrections officers, military, fire/
EMS fallen in the line of duty or on
hard times. Food, entertainment to
follow.
Middle Of Nowhere Scooter
Club ([email protected]
hoo.com, facebook.com/middleofno-
wheresc)
• Rally: April 27-29, Stroudsburg.
Project Fallen Motorcycle
Ride May 5, registration 10 a.m.-
noon, ride immediately follows.
Begins Jefferson Park, ends Morgan
Hills Golf Course (219 Hunlock Hae-
veyville Road, Hunlock Creek). Bene-
fits military, law enforcement, fire/
EMS, corrections family or individual
who has “fallen” in line of duty or on
hard times. Refreshments, entertain-
ment after ride.
BENEFITS / CHARITY
EVENTS
8th Annual Moonlight Walk/
Run April 29, Nay Aug Park, Scran-
ton. Registration/family festival, 3
p.m.; Kid’s Fun Run, 5 p.m.; 5K and 10K
Walkers’ start, 5:30 p.m.; 5K and 10K
Runners’ start, 6 p.m.; award ceremo-
ny, 7:15 p.m. Benefits Children’s
Advocacy Center of NEPA. Regis-
tration forms at 1710 Mulberry St.,
Scranton, active.com, neparunne-
r.org. Info: 570.969.7313
American Lung Association
• Fight For Air Kick-off Luncheon:
May 10, noon-1 p.m., Mohegan Sun at
Pocono Downs. Free. RSVP by calling
570.823.2212, e-mailing [email protected]
ginfo.org.
Bowl for Life May 12, 6-8 p.m.,
Chacko’s Family Bowling Center (195
N. Wilkes-Barre Blvd., Wilkes-Barre).
$20/person, teams of 5. Prizes,
raffles, 2 hours bowling, shoe rental,
one plain pizza, one pitcher soda. In
honor of Barbara Struckus. Info:
570.760.4083, 814.1056, 574.9820.
Proceeds benefit American Cancer
Society.
Camera For A Cure
(570.604.4355, cameraforacure.com)
• Moonlight Run: April 29, Nay Aug
Park, Scranton.
Candy’s Place (570.714.8800)
•15th Annual Rainbow Walk: May 12,
registration 9 a.m., walk 10 a.m., Kirby
Park Pavilion, Kingston. $25, pro-
ceeds benefit programs at Candy’s
Place. To register, call or visit can-
cerwellnessnepa.org.
Carnival of Hope May 5, 1-5 p.m.,
VFW Post 283 (757 Wyoming Ave.,
Kingston). Free, family-friendly.
Entertainment by Magic of Bill Dick-
son, The Dancers Warehouse, Ronald
McDonald, Exit Sixxx, juggler Mike
Simon. Tarot readings, food, bever-
age, bake sale, basket raffles, games
for purchase. For info, contact Nepa-
[email protected] Proceeds
benefit NEPA Center Cancer Wellness,
Candy’s Place.
MainStreet Chamber Lacka-
wanna County
• Business Card Exchange/Fundrais-
er: April 30, 5-8 p.m., Barrett’s Pub
(474 Main St., Archbald). Free. Food,
cash bar. Seeking sponsors. Benefits
Women’s Resource Center of Scran-
ton. To sign up, visit Lackawanna-
.mainstreetchamber.net.
A Night for Nick April 28, 5-10
p.m., Adventure Zone, Scranton. $25.
To honor Army Specialist Nick Sta-
back, injured in Afghanistan. Seeking:
Items for raffles, food donations,
paper products. To make monetary
donation, make check to “A Night for
Nick,” mail to P.O. Box 67 Archbald,
PA 18403. Proceeds go to Nick and
family. Info, to donate:
[email protected],
570.878.0757.
Susquehanna Flood Relief
Benefit Concert May 6, 2 p.m.,
Ladore Camp Pavilion (287 Owego
Turnpike, Waymart). $10 at door, at
570.253.1982. Students enter by
donation. Other donations welcome.
Make checks to “The Salvation Army
West Pittston,” “Susq. Benefit” in
memo, mail to: The Salvation Army
West Pittston, 214 Luzerne Avenue,
West Pittston, PA 18643. Attention:
Major Sheryl Hershey. Benefits Sus-
quehanna flood victims.
Victims Resource Center (71
North Franklin St, 570.823.0765,
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 61
puzzles
ACROSS
1 Macrame and origami
5 Spill the beans
9 Swine home
12 Old Italian money
13 Parks or Bonheur
14 Rage
15 “Animal House” event
17 Aviv preceder
18 Garb
19 “Monopoly” building
21 Therefore
22 “SNL” alumna Oteri
24 Bridge coup
27 Writer Buscaglia
28 Giant in a nightmare,
maybe
31 Moray, for one
32 Under the weather
33 Towel designation
34 Post-bath application
36 Aviate
37 Halt
38 Wild West show
40 2009 Pixar movie
41 Backbone
43 Quiver contents
47 Funny guy
48 “Sleep well”
51 Potsdam pronoun
52 Sleeping
53 Merriment
54 Bumped into
55 Old letter opener?
56 Appear
DOWN
1 - Romeo
2 Urban disturbance
3 Horse’s gait
4 Great cruelty
5 Cheese choice
6 Journal
7 Blond shade
8 Wash in a tub
9 Wait patiently
10 Genealogy chart
11 Holler
16 To and -
20 Acapulco gold
22 Yo-Yo Ma’s
instrument
23 Sacred
24 Collection
25 Meadow
26 Fine
27 Biography
29 Carnival city
30 Kreskin’s claim
35 Inmate
37 Parsley servings
39 “La Toilette” painter
40 Coffee vessel
41 Take to the pool
42 Gait
43 Finds the sum
44 Look lustfully
45 Roller coaster cry
46 Goblet feature
49 Sapporo sash
50 “- the ramparts ...”
last week
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just for the
health of it
By Tim Hlivia
Special to the Weekender
bitch & brag
By Jeff and Amanda of 98.5 KRZ
Special to the Weekender
Amanda’s Bitch:
You literally can’t watch
TV right now without being
smacked in the face by a
political attack ad. All week-
end it was one after another
after another … pretty much
all slamming the guy in the
ad that aired prior.
I don’t know about you,
but I find these ads so chil-
dish. Don’t get me wrong, I
know very little about poli-
tics, but I know enough to
know that these nasty ads
distract from the point of
voting the best candidate
into office to make things
happen. Forget the other guy
and focus on your own cam-
paign, your own lifestyle
and your own practices.
Don’t these ads turn you
off to the entire voting proc-
ess? Personally, seeing a
candidate sling mud and
point fingers at his competi-
tion makes me respect the
candidate less than I did
when the ad started. Talk
about yourself! Explain to
us, the public, why you’re
the right person for the
powerful gig.
There are a handful of
candidates that have mostly
attack ads running, and how
far is it getting them? These
ads communicate to me that
you don’t have much to say,
so instead you’re going to
point fingers at someone
else to take the negative
attention off of yourself and
the fact that you don’t have
much to say.
It says a whole lot about
your character when your
campaign is based on slam-
ming the guy next to you.
That’s all. I’m just looking
forward to campaign season
ending so we can enjoy
more Activia commercials
again.
Jeff’s Brag:
This week, I wanted to
pass along a little suggestion
I found really helpful in
losing excess pounds and
getting in battle shape for
the summer season ahead.
The world, and women in
particular, seems to be car-
bohydrate crazy and let’s
face it, most of the delicious
stuff we crave is usually
loaded with sugar.
Here’s a way to satisfy
your sweet tooth and at the
same time pump up your
daily protein intake. (And as
most fitness people know,
you can’t build muscle with-
out enough protein.) Parrillo
Performance produces a wide
variety of supplements and
protein powders that you can
do amazing things with. For
instance, with its powder, I
make protein cookies, brow-
nies and even cakes lathered
in protein frosting. They
have very little fat and carbs
and taste yummy — and I
am an extremely fussy eater!
None of these require any-
thing but a bowl, a big
spoon and an oven! They
even have a mix to make
your own protein ice cream,
although I haven’t attempted
that yet because you do
need an ice-cream maker or
very powerful blender.
Now to be totally honest,
there are drawbacks. It takes
a little effort, and they’re
not going to be as cheap as
a regular cake or cookies.
Plus, with a few of the
items, you need to use MCT
oil, which simply stands for
medium chain trygliceride.
It’s an oil that cannot be
converted to body fat, and
there’s a brand called Cap
Tri. I’ve found other great
uses for it, too, like cooking
popcorn.
If you know you’re eating
too many carbs and sugar,
and you’re looking for a
tasty snack that is packed
with protein, check out the
product line at parrillo.com.
I highly recommend the
shortbread cookie mix. They
cook in minutes. I also love
the protein chocolate cake
mix with vanilla frosting.
(The frosting is awesome,
and you simply mix the
powder with water!) Get
more information on the
website and say goodbye to
those Twinkies! W
Hear Jeff & Amanda Bitch
and Brag Fridays at 3:30
p.m. on 98.5 KRZ.
You know political ads are irking Amanda if she’d
welcome seeing ones for this yogurt instead.
With Parrillo Performance, you get your cookies and
frosting fix with a side of protein.
S
o you’ve finally lost those
extra pounds. Keeping that
weight at bay can some-
times be just as tough of a battle.
The perfect insurance policy for
weight maintenance is purchas-
ing a few expensive, well-tailored
pieces of clothing to add to your
wardrobe. It’s a great reward for
all that hard work and a good
way of keeping your body in
check.
Clothing is your external re-
flection of mood and mode. The
right clothing, tempered with
proper fit, texture and color is a
keen measure of confidence and
personality. Expression and ex-
perimentation are wonderful;
however, mild adherence to tradi-
tional attire trumps that of fad
apparel.
Before you run rampant in the
nearest department store, visit
local clothing boutiques and
locate a salesperson with an eye
for style. Be slightly conservative
in your approach. Sometimes
dramatic weight loss can lead
people to dress inappropriately.
Save the leather pants for the
night club and the yoga pants for
yoga.
Just because you lost weight
doesn’t mean you need to ditch
your entire wardrobe. If your
clothes are too big, but made of
good quality, a trip to a tailor is
the perfect remedy. Clothes with
the proper fit will make any size
look fabulous. And don’t forget
to accessorize; a handsome watch
calls attention to strong forearms
and great earrings and necklaces
draw attention to the face. Acces-
sories are the final touches to a
perfect outfit. They allow you to
personalize your look and give
you the confidence to feel totally
put together.
Losing weight isn’t just about
vanity though, it’s much deeper
than that. A true testament to
creating an overall healthier
image is Marybeth, a client of
mine. Marybeth was overweight
most of her adult life and strug-
gled with self confidence and
self esteem.
“My husband became ill and,
as a result, I completely neglect-
ed myself to take care of him,”
Marybeth, 51, said. “Sadly, my
husband passed away, and I
found myself struggling to make
ends meet. I worked two jobs to
support myself and my son. A
year after my husband passed, I
set out to reclaim myself. Simply
put, I had no style. Shopping for
clothes was never enjoyable. I
was a size 16 at my heaviest and
now after working with Tim, I
am a size six. I feel strong and
the healthiest I’ve ever been.”
For Marybeth, losing weight
wasn’t about achieving the per-
fect body or fitting into a specif-
ic size. It was about redefining
herself both internally and ex-
ternally.
“Losing the weight completely
bolstered my self image and I
feel amazing.” W
Looking
great after
the weight
Tim’s client Marybeth,
before.
Marybeth, after she lost
weight.
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www.vrcnepa.org)
• Take Back the Night March and
Rally: April 25, march 5:30 p.m.,
Wilkes student center/King’s campus
center, walk to Public Square, join,
proceed to VRC. Public welcome.
Refreshments in Kirby Health Center
following. In observance of National
Crime Victims Rights Week. Info
tables/displays at King’s College
Sheehy-Farmer Campus Center/
Wilkes University Henry Student
Center, 11a.m.-4 p.m.
Walk to Cure Type 1 Diabetes
May 5, registration 9:30 a.m., walk 10
a.m., Montrose, meet Pump ’n’ Pan-
try. 3.5 miles. Info: walktocurejuveni-
lediabetes.org, 570.289.4062. Pro-
ceeds benefit Type 1 Diabetes Re-
search Foundation.
WFTE FM90.3/105.7 Get On
the Air Benefit Concerts
• Jim Carro: April 26, Chestnut
Street Tavern, Dunmore.
• Fud: April 28, Chestnut Street
Tavern, Dunmore.
Wilkes-Barre YMCA
• Healthy Kids Day: April 28, 10
a.m.-2 p.m., YMCA (40 W. North-
ampton St, Wilkes-Barre). Healthy-
snack making, gardening, swimming,
fitness classes, appearance by W-B
Fire Department Fire Safety Smoke
House. Call 570.823.2191 ext. 222,
e-mail [email protected] for
info.
Wyoming Valley Children’s
Association (570.288.4350)
• Do It for the Kids 5K Run: April 25,
River Common at Millennium Circle,
Wilkes-Barre. Registration 5 p.m., 5k
start, 6 p.m., awards ceremony, 6:45
p.m. Info: 570.714.1246, lkozel-
[email protected]
• Walk-a-Thon: April 28, registration
9 a.m. walk 10 a.m., awards/post-walk
celebration 10:45 a.m., WVCA Pre-
School (1133 Wyoming Ave., Forty
Fort). Info: 570.714.1246, lkozel-
[email protected]
EVENTS
2nd Annual Clifton R. Lewis
Good Life Foundation: Celeb-
rity Basketball Game Dunk
Contest & 3-Point Shootout
April 28, doors 6:30 p.m., Greater
Nanticoke Area High School (425
Kosciuszko St., Nanticoke). $7 dona-
tion. NFL players, musicians, half
court, shot contest, Steve Mclendon,
Michael “AirDogg” Stewart.
10th Annual Great Valley
Technology Alliance Busi-
ness Plan Competition May 2,
cocktail hour 5:30 p.m., awards
dinner 6:30 p.m., Mohegan Sun at
Pocono Downs. Info: nepbpc.com
34th Annual Renaissance
Jamboree April 28, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.,
downtown Bloomsburg. Rain or shine.
Arts and crafts booths, non-profit
food, game booths. Flippenout, music
by Joyous, Lightning Stevenson,
Clickard Consortium, more. Children’s
Stage, Jefferson Street. BTE perform-
ances, 2 p.m., Phillips Emporium,
free. Pony rides. Info: 570.784.2522
American Legion Mountain
Post 781 (Mountain Top)
• 3rd Annual Flea Market: May 6, 7
a.m.-5 p.m. $10 under cover with
table, $5 yard BYOT, public welcome.
To register call 570.332.5658.
Annual Mother’s Day After-
noon Tea May 6, 1-3 p.m., The
Woodhouse Day Spa (387 Wyoming
Ave., Kingston). Traditional tea,
sandwiches, pastries. Free gift. Skin
analysis, mini neck/shoulder mas-
sage, NuFace lifting treatment, color
matching (makeup) available. Draw-
ing for Mother’s Day Spa package
valued at $180. Free, open to public.
RSVP required to 570.763.0063 by
May 3.
Browndale Fire Co. (Route 247,
620 Marion St., Browndale,
43fire.com)
• Homemade Pierogi For Sale:
donation $6/dozen. Potato and
cheese. To order, contact any mem-
ber, call 570.499.4908, e-mail
[email protected], go online.
Chicken Barbecue May 5,
noon-5 p.m., Taylor Fire Department,
Ladder Company 95 (614 Union St.,
Taylor). $8. Tickets at door or by
calling 570.878.1466, members of
Ladder 95. Half chicken, baked beans,
potato salad, dessert, beverages.
T-shirts, mugs for sale at door.
Chicory House and Folklore
Society (www.folkloresociety.org,
570.333.4007) events:
• New England Contra Dance: May 5,
7 p.m., Church of Christ Uniting (776
Market St., Kingston). Lily-Rose and
the Rhythm Traders, calling by David
Rupp. No partner/previous experi-
ence needed. $9/adults, reduced rate
for families.
Choral Arts of Luzerne
County (www.choralartslc.org)
• Spring Concerts: April 28, 7:30
p.m., Presbyterian Church (97 S.
Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre); April 29, 3
p.m., Christ Lutheran Church (210 W.
Green St., Hazleton). $15/adults,
$10/students, seniors, tickets at door,
in advance from chorus members or
by sending check payable to Choral
Arts of Luzerne County, 190 South
Sprague Ave., Kingston.
Choral Society
• Children and Youth Ensembles
Present Annual Spring Concert: May
6, 3 p.m., St. Luke’s Episcopal Church,
Scranton. $10/adults, free/18 and
younger, $2 discount for seniors,
students, Lackawanna Library Sys-
tem Card holders, members of WVIA,
Raymond Hood Room. Info: choralso-
ciety.net
Dietrich Theater (60 E. Tioga
Street, Tunkhannock, 570.996.1500,
www.dietrichtheater.com) calendar
of events:
❏ Kids Classes:
• Quilting for Kids: “Monkey’s
Wrench:” Wed., through June 13,
3:30-5 p.m. Ages 6+. $6/class. Call to
register.
• All About Poetry and Sculpture:
Ages 5-8: April 25, 4-5:30 p.m.; Ages
9-12, April 26, 4-5:30 p.m. $35/4
classes. Call to register.
• Young Art: Pottery for Preschool-
ers: April 26, 10-10:45 a.m. Ages 4-5.
$35. Call to register.
❏ Intergenerational Classes:
• Golden Days of Radio Players:
Tues., through May 22, 7-9 p.m. Free.
Call to register.
• Quilting for Everyone: “Arrowhead
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 63
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 58
tech talk
By Nick Delorenzo
Special to the Weekender
C
omputers have a very long
memory; everything’s fair
game, it seems, no matter
how long ago it happened.
For better or worse, Internet
memory — and embarrassment
— isn’t limited to things that
happened in the digital era. Con-
version of old tapes and photos
into modern formats has never
been easier or cheaper.
In most cases, it’s just the push
of a button away, so whether it
be 1972 or 2012, all of the dumb
things you did back then can still
come back to haunt you no mat-
ter how much you’d like to for-
get.
Even the most famous of stars
have things they’d rather forget:
Leonard Nimoy’s horrific “The
Ballad of Bilbo Baggins” music
video, for example. But for those
of you who have memories that
you don’t want to forget, time is
running out.
Many of you probably have
treasured family memories on
VHS or, if you were a bit more
progressive or a little less lucky,
Betamax tapes. You might have
audio cassettes or even 8-tracks
that still work.
Well, if they’re more than 10
years old, they’re already on
borrowed time. Magnetic media,
or anything that you call a
“tape,” is subject to decay, no
matter how carefully it’s stored.
Even media that uses physical
storage — whether it’s an optical
CD, DVD or Blu-ray — is sub-
ject to degradation through
scratches or exposure to heat or
humidity.
Digital files don’t have the
same vulnerabilities. While
they’re prone to accidental dele-
tion or getting lost because of
poor organization, they won’t
become degraded by the envi-
ronment (the same cannot be
said for the hard drives or ma-
chines they’re stored on), and
duplicating them or sharing them
is far simpler.
So how do you go about con-
verting your old VHS movies,
records or cassettes into digital
files? There are a number of
ways.
There are gadgets out there
that you can simply attach to
your existing VCR or turntable
and “play” the file into your
computer for recording. These
devices range in price from $20
to $200 depending on the device
and software included and can be
found at Best Buy, on Ama-
zon.com or many other electron-
ics retailers. As with anything
else, the more you spend, the
better the quality and ease of use.
There are also services that
can handle the tasks for you.
Send them the video or tape, and
they’ll return the tape and the
digitized files. Many drug stores
and shopping centers can per-
form the service as well, for
photos in many cases and videos
in others.
If you’ve got particularly sen-
sitive or old tapes, you may want
to consider sending them to a
service, as the simple act of
playing an older video can often
destroy the cassette. If you’re
relatively savvy or you’re limited
on time or money, most of the
conversion tools you can buy are
relatively inexpensive and fairly
simple to setup. W
Preserving
the past
If you’ve got family videos stored on these, time is
running out to save them.
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Jacki Lukas,
Courtdale
J
acki Lukas is part of an exciting new venture.
Experiencing first-hand the growth of the Wilkes-
Barre YMCA, Jacki is busy networking and
sharing the news about the brand-new student
apartments. Active in the community with charity
walks and pretty much anything geared toward
good health, Jacki, perhaps unknowingly, is already a
perfect ambassador for the YMCAand its mission.
Get to know Jacki Lukas…
Favorite thing about your job: It’s so cool to be the
first community coordinator on this brand-new project. It’s
a totally new idea on student housing in our area … and
who would have thought it’s in an 80-year-old building!
It’s so cool to “wow” all of the people who come to see the
apartments. It’s not something you expect to see in Wilkes-
Barre because the apartments have such a big-city feel. 40
West is an amazing value because we offer services above
and beyond what your private off-campus landlord would
offer.
Community involvement: I always do my best to
participate in charity walks in the area. They are always
for such great causes and it helps me get up and moving!
My boyfriend and I recently walked in the 1st Annual Max
Fine Memorial Walk.
Recent news about yourself or place of
employment: We are nearing our project completion date
at the Wilkes-Barre YMCA. We’re very excited to show
off all of the different parts of the facility that have been
renovated, including the apartments!
Hobbies: I’m really into being healthy and staying
fit. I do my best to take my bike instead of my car and
walk wherever I can. I’ve been taking full advantage of
the Wilkes-Barre YMCA, and I am training for the swim
portion of the triathlon this summer with my brother and
sister, so I’ve been swimming every chance I get! About
a year and a half ago, I discovered NEPACrossFit and I
really enjoy training there as well.
What did you want to be when you grew up? I
wanted to be an English teacher because I’ve always loved
writing and reading.
Favorite quote: “You have to let go of fear because it
holds us back from our dreams.”
If you could teach more people to … eat healthy!
It’s so important to put good foods into your body.
What do you like to do in your spare time? I love
to go hiking and be outdoors with my family, boyfriend
and dog. Recently, I’ve really changed my eating habits,
so I really enjoy cooking in the kitchen and experimenting
with so many different natural foods. I love to bake healthy
treats, too!...
Who is...
Community Coordinator for 40 West
Apartments, located inside the
Wilkes-BarreYMCA
PHOTOGRAPH BY RACHEL A. PUGH
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Star:” Wed., through June 13, 6-7:30
p.m. Ages 6+. $6/class. Call to regis-
ter.
• Open Studio and Portfolio Prep:
Tues., 7-8:30 p.m. May 1, 8, 15, 22;
ongoing, $15/class, $60/all classes.
Call to register.
❏ Adult Classes:
• Pottery for Beginners: 7-8:30 p.m.
Series 1: April 25; Series 2: May 2, 9,
16, 23; Series 3: May 30, June 6, 20,
27. Ages 13+. $60/class. Call to regis-
ter.
• Decorative Painting: April 25, May
16, 23, 30. Ages 16+. $20/class plus
cost of painting surface. Pre-regis-
tration required, call to register.
❏ Special Events:
• Titanic Memorabilia Exhibit:
through April. Free.
• Spring 2012 Film Festival: through
April 26, excluding opening night
gala, $8 before 6 p.m., $9 evenings.
Visit website for movies and show
times.
• Philadelphia Art and History Bus
Trip: May 3, bus departs from theater
8 a.m., returns 11 p.m. $110, includes
bus, museum, exhibit admission,
map, does not include meals. Audio
tour of “Van Gogh Up Close.” Call for
reservations.
Dirty Girl Mud Run May 5,
Toyota Pavilion at Montage Moun-
tain, Moosic. Portion of registration
fees donated to National Breast
Cancer Foundation. For info/to regis-
ter, visit godirtygirl.com.
Doug Smith Music (dougsmith-
[email protected], 570.343.7271)
• April 28, May 12, 8:30-11 p.m., Skytop
Lodge, Skytop. 16-piece big band.
Info: 595.7401
Geneva School’s 7th Annual
“Taste of the Valley” May 2,
5:30-8 p.m., Fiorelli’s (Main Ave.,
Peckville). $15/advance adults, $5/
advance kids under 12. $20/door.
Taste foods prepared by some of
best local eateries. Live auction,
basket raffles. Restaurants/caterers
wishing to participate, contact reve-
[email protected],
570.489.7620. All proceeds benefit
The Geneva School. For info/tickets,
call or visit geneva-school.org.
Greater Hazleton Chamber
of Commerce events (20 W.
Broad St.):
• Chamber Breakfast Program:
Senator John Yudichak, April 25
7:45-9 a.m., Keystone Job Corps
Center Culinary Arts Building $20/
members, $25/public; Luzerne County
Manager Robert Lawton, May 31;
Senator John Gordner, June 21.
The Greater Scranton Cham-
ber of Commerce events:
•16th Annual Community Reading
Day: April 25, 9 a.m. Volunteers
needed to spend hour with second
graders. Individuals or companies.
Info: 570.342.7711, [email protected]
tonchamber.com.
King’s College: (133 North River
St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.208.5957 or
www.kings.edu) events:
• Global Landscapes Conference
Keynote: April 26, 7 p.m., Burke
Auditorium, William G. McGowan
School of Business. Free. Former CEO
Nilofer Merchant presenting “Why
Being Big Isn’t Big Enough, Any-
more.”
•10th Annual Spring Concert: April
28, 7:30 p.m., Carroll McCormick
Campus Ministry Center (Jackson St.,
Wilkes-Barre). Info: 208.6044
Lackawanna College events
(Mellow Theater, 501 Vine St., Scran-
ton, 570.955.1455)
❏ Environmental Institute events:
(Rt. 435, Covington Twp.,
570.842.1506, www.lackawanna.edu)
• Natural Wonders: Inside of an Egg:
every other Thurs., through June 7,
1-2:30 p.m. Ages 3-5 and guardian.
$40/series of 6. Pre-registration
required.
• Art in Nature: Ceramics for Se-
niors: April 26, 2-4 p.m. Hand building
techniques, includes pottery wheel.
No experience necessary. $100, all
materials provided. Pre-payment
required. Make-up dates available.
• Art in Nature: Children’s Clayplay:
April 26, 6-8 p.m. Hand building
techniques including pinch, coil and
slab pottery. No experience neces-
sary. Kids 7+. $100 per person, all
materials provided. Pre-payment
required. Make-up dates available.
Leadership Lackawanna
events
• Night at the Races Fundraiser:
April 28, 7-10:30 p.m.
Marywood University events
(2300 Adams Avenue, Scranton,
www.marywood.edu, 570.348.6211)
• Orchestra Concert: April 28, 7:30
p.m., Sette LaVerghetta Center for
Performing Arts. Free. For info, visit
marywood.edu/mtd.
Misericordia University
events (www.misericordia.edu,
570.674.6400, box office 674.6719):
• “Ensemble Evening: Music:” April
25, 7:30 p.m., Lemmond Theater,
Walsh Hall. Free, open to public.
• 2nd Annual Underdogs’ Time To
Shine (MUTTS) Dog Show: April 28,
registration 1 p.m., show 2 p.m. $10
registration fee/dog, $5/animal
supply donation (cat litter, treats,
dry/canned cat/dog food, leashes,
trash bags, cleaning supplies). Prizes.
All dogs must be leashed. Info: car-
[email protected], [email protected]
sericordia.edu
The Osterhout Free Library
events (71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-
Barre, www.osterhout.info,
570.821.1959)
• Open Computer Lab: Mon./Wed.,
5-8 p.m.; Sat., 1-4 p.m.
• Knit & Crochet Group: April 28,
May 12, 10:30 a.m.-noon. All ages.
Safe Haven Dog Rescue
(www.SafeHavenPa.org, Safe-
[email protected])
• Adoption Day: April 28, 10 a.m.-2
p.m., Berger’s Agway (Rte. 209,
Brodheadsville). Dogs available to
meet and get to know. Pre-adoption
application with references, home
visit required prior to adoption.
• Adoption Day: May 6, 10 a.m.-2
p.m., Wal-mart, Rte. 940, Mt. Pocono.
Dogs available to meet and get to
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 65
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 61
HEARD OF US NOW?
HEARD OF US NOW?
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Get out & try the many
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throughout the Electric City
for an unbeatable price!
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Look What
You Missed
Shinedown at the Scranton
Cultural Center
Photos by: Jason Riedmiller
know. Pre-adoption application with
references, home visit required prior
to adoption.
Sons of the American Le-
gion Post 781 (Church Rd. Moun-
tain Top, 570.474.2161, alpost781.org)
events:
• Flea Market and Chicken Roast
Dinner: May 6, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Vendors
wanted. Cost for flea market, $5,
bring table/tent. Registration by
phone, call 570.332.5658. Chicken
dinner, $8, includes 1/2 roasted chick-
en, baked potato, coleslaw, roll,
dessert; noon-5 p.m.
St. Mary Byzantine Catholic
Church (695 N. Main St., Wilkes-
Barre, 570.822.6028)
• Night at the Races: May 5, doors 5
p.m., post time 5:45 p.m. All you can
eat and drink. Free admission w/
purchase of $10 horse. 21+. Info:
762.4120, 822.7031
St. Michael’s Ukrainian Or-
thodox Church (540 N. Main
Ave., Scranton, 570.343.7165)
• Pierogi Sale every Fri., 11 a.m.-5
p.m.
St. Stephen’s Episcopal Pro-
Cathedral (35 S. Franklin St.,
Wilkes-Barre, 570.346.4600)
• Food Pantry open Mon.-Fri.,
noon-4 p.m.
• Clothing Closet: free clothing for
men, women, children. Open Tues.,
4-6:30 p.m., Wed., noon-3:30 p.m.
Tracey’s Hope Hospice Care
Programand Domestic Ani-
mal Rescue (570.466.7930, tra-
[email protected],
petservicesbydenise.com)
• 4th Annual Memorial Pet Walk:
May 5, McDade Park, Scranton. If you
chose to walk and not seek sponsors,
$15. For info/sponsor sheet, call
570.457.1625, visit website.
Treasures of the Earth 9th
Annual Show & Sale May 5, 10
a.m.-5 p.m.; May 6, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., St
Joseph Oblate Seminary (1880 Rte.
315, Pittston). Free parking. $3, under
12 free. Info: 800.473.3602
Tunkhannock Business and
Professional Women
• Wine Down at the Dietrich: April
26, doors 6:15 p.m., showing of “The
Help” 7:30 p.m. Wine, chocolate,
raffles. Advance tickets, $25, call
570.836.2111.
United Rehabilitation Ser-
vices (489 W. Broad St., Hazleton,
570.459.9784) events:
• Spring Bazaar: May 5, 11 a.m.-8 p.m.
Sherri O’Donnell, “All That Dancin,”
Our Proud Voices. May 6, 11 a.m.-5
p.m., Elite Dance Company, Richie
Molinaro, Mr. Lou.
• Charity Auction: May 6, regis-
tration 3:30 p.m., auction 4 p.m.
The University of Scranton
events:
• Schemel Forum Springtime in the
Hudson Valley bus trip: April 28, 7:30
a.m. Roosevelt Library at Hyde Park,
Storm King Sculpture Park, lunch at
Culinary Institute of America. Departs
from Linden Circle. Pre-registration
required. $70. Call 570.941.7816.
• Urban Beats Dance Show: April 28,
7 p.m., McIlhenny Ballroom, DeNaples
Center. Free. Call 570.941.5441.
• “29th Annual World Premiere
Composition Series Concert:” April
28, 7:30 p.m., Houlihan-McLean Cen-
ter. Free. Call 570.941.7624.
• Earth Week Lecture by William
Brady: April 30, 6 p.m. MosKovitz
Theater, DeNaples Center. Free. Call
941-7520.
❏ Schemel Forum Courses, $60/
person, $100/couple. To register,
contact 570.941.7816, [email protected]
ton.edu:
• “Madness, Mystery and Murderous
Desire: Charles Dickens’ ‘Bleak
House:’” May 1, 8. Weinberg Memorial
Library, 6-7:15 p.m.
Waverly Community House
(1115 N. Abington Rd., Waverly,
570.586.8191, www.waverlycomm.org)
events:
• Ballroom Dancing Lessons: Wed.,
7:15 p.m., Comm auditorium. Basic &
advanced ballroom, swing. $15/per-
son. For info, call Vince Brust at
489.3111.
• 20th Annual Spring Show: April 28,
10 a.m.-5 p.m., April 29, 11 a.m.-4 p.m.
The Flippin’ Bird, Paul Funke Photog-
raphy, Ethan Allen, Sugar Plum Choc-
olates, more. Raffle. Show tickets $6
at door, $5.50 with show card/ad.
Wayne County Builders As-
sociation
• Spring Home and Garden Festival:
April 28, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., April 29, 9
a.m.-4 p.m., Ladore Lodge Camp
Retreat & Conference Center, Way-
mart. Free. Vendors wanted. Food,
arts and crafts vendors, seminars,
raffles, auction, more. Vendor starts
$125 depending on booth size, loca-
tion. Info: WayneCountyBuilders.com,
570.226.4941.
• 6th Annual Children’s LEGO Build-
ing Contest: April 28, sign-in 1 p.m.,
contest 1:30 p.m. Ladore Lodge Camp
Retreat & Conference Center, Way-
mart. Ages 5-8, 9-12. Prizes. Pre-
registration required. For form, call
570.226.4941, visit Estemerwalt Log
Homes (505 Adams Pond Road,
Honesdale).
• Electronic Recycling Event: April
28, drop off 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Ladore
Camp & Conference Center, Waymart.
No fee, donations welcome. Large
amount, pre-register for designated
drop off time. Info: 570.226.4941,
[email protected]
West Pittston Chapter of
The Salvation Army 100th
Anniversary May 10-12. Banquet,
open house, more. Info:
570.655.5947, Sheryl.her-
[email protected]
West Pittston Rams Parents
Association 1st Annual Golf
Tournament April 28, Four Sea-
sons Golf Course (750 Slocum Ave.,
Exeter). Funds go to purchase of
safety equipment for football, cheer-
leading departments. $50, $100
sponsors, call 570.954.0329. Info:
westpittstonrams.com.

World Laughter Day May 6,
12:30-3:30 p.m., pavilion pool, Nay Aug
Park, Scranton. Mini laughter yoga
every 30 min.; Kids Joke Telling
Showcase 1:30 p.m. Judith Youshock
on hand w/art supplies for painting
of community mural for Humor
Therapy Fund of the Scranton Area
Foundation. Basket raffles. Info:
570.650.7518, LaughToLive.net
Wyoming County Chamber
Of Commerce
• “The Danger of Disconnect:” May
9, 11:45 a.m.-1p.m., Twig’s Cafe, Tunk-
hannock. To reserve, contact
570.875.8325, [email protected]
• Business Expo: June 1, 10 a.m.-4
p.m., Wyoming County Fairgrounds.
Deadline to register May 1. Info/
register: 570.836.7755, 875.8325.
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 66
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 63
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Wyoming Seminary Per-
forming Arts Institute (201
North Sprague Avenue, Kingston,
570.270.2186). Events free and open
to public.
• Wind Ensemble/Jazz Ensemble/
Percussion Ensemble Present Con-
cert of Jazz and Music: May 1, 7 p.m.,
Buckingham Performing Arts Center
(N. Sprague Ave., Kingston). Free,
open to public. Info: 270.2192
HISTORY
Everhart Museum(1901 Mulber-
ry St., Scranton, 570.346.7186,
www.everhart-museum.org)
• 4th International Migratory Bird
Day: April 28, 1-4 p.m. World-wide
event in celebration/support of
migratory bird conservation. Conser-
vation of Rare Species lecture, 1-2
p.m.; Painting Nature, 2-3 p.m.; Rap-
tors Rule lecture, 3-4 p.m. Work-
shops: Can Birds Talk?; Birds as
Symbols Tour; Avian Adaptation;
Feathers & Flies; Birds & Books;
Guided tours. Free w/ paid admission.
Lackawanna Historical So-
ciety (The Catlin House, 232 Monroe
Avenue, Scranton, 570.344.3841)
• 3rd Annual You Live Here You
Should Know This Local History Game
Show: May 11-12, 6-9 p.m., Shopland
Hall, Scranton Cultural Center. Family
Feud style. Food/drinks for purchase.
$10 admission, $5 students. Open to
public.
Luzerne County Historical
Society (49 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-
Barre, 570.823.6244, [email protected])
• 2nd Annual Classic Car Show: May
6, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Historic Swetland
Homestead (885 Wyoming Ave.,
Wyoming). Open to any vehicle.
$15/vehicle; free for spectators. All
proceeds benefit LCHS. DJ Steel
Dragon, 50/50, prize raffle, food.
Trophies, dash plaques, goody bags.
Rain date May 20.
LEARNING
A.C. Moore (2190 Wilkes-Barre
Twp. Marketplace, 570.820.0570)
• Mom and Me art classes: every
Fri., noon-1 p.m. $15, includes supplies.
Sign up 24 hours in advance, call to
register.
AFA Gallery (514 Lackawanna
Ave., Scranton, 570.969.1040 or
Artistsforart.com)
• Children’s Art Start: Sat. through
May 12, 12:30-1:30 p.m. $80, ages 6-12.
Drawing, painting, clay.
• Theatre for Children: Wed. through
May 9, 4:30-6 p.m. $75, ages 4 and
up.
Academy of Northern Mar-
tial Arts (79 N. Main St., Pittston)
Traditional Kung Fu & San Shou. For
Health and Defense. Adult & Chil-
dren’s Classes, Mon.-Thurs., Sat. First
class free. Walk-ins welcome, call
371.9919, 817.2161 for info.
Adult Kung Fu (Kung Fu & Tai Chi
Center, Wilkes-Barre: 570.829.2707)
Ongoing classes. Tues./Thurs., 6:30
p.m. Study of Chinese Martial Art
open hand, weapons sets. Mon., Wed.,
6:30 p.m. Covers Chinese style theo-
ries, concepts, applications. “Sport”
fighting concepts explained, prac-
ticed.
ArtWorks Gallery & Studio
(502 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton.
570.207.1815):
❏ Children’s Spring Workshops:
• Art Start: Sat., through May 12,
12:30-1:30 p.m. $80 for 6-week series
in drawing, painting, clay.
• Theatre: Wed., through May 9,
4:30-6 p.m.
BallroomDancing Class
through June 14, Thurs., 6-7 p.m.,
Mid-Valley Senior Center (310 Church
St., Jessup). $5/class 55+, $7/class
others. Taught by certified members
of Dance Educators of America
Joanne and Ed Samborski. Foxtrot,
waltz, swing, rumba, tango, samba,
hustle, more. Call 570.489.4415.
BallroomDance Class through
June 29, Fri., 12:30-1:30 p.m. U.N.C.
South Side Senior Center (425 Alder
St., Scranton). Taught by certified
members of Dance Educators of
America. Foxtrot, samba, waltz,
rumba, swing, more. $5/class for 55+,
$7/class others. Info: 570.346.2487
Dance Contours (201 Bear Creek
Blvd., Wilkes-Barre, 570.208.0152,
www.dancecontours.com)
• Adult classes: ballet, tap, lyrical,
CardioSalsa, ballroom dance.
• Children/teen classes: ballet, tap,
CheerDance, HipTech Jazz, a form of
dance blending basic Jazz Technique
with styles of street dance, hip hop.
• Zumba classes for adults: Tues., 6
p.m., Sat., 10 a.m. First class free.
• Adult ballet: Sat. morn.
Danko’s Core Wrestling
Strength Training Camp
(DankosAllAmericanFitness.com)
• Four sessions/week, features two
clinics, two core strength. 4 ses-
sions/week. Increase power, speed,
agility. Group discounts, coaches,
teams, clubs, free stuff. Visit website
or call Larry Danko at 570.825.5989
for info.
Downtown Dojo Karate A-
cademy (84 S. Main St., Wilkes-
Barre, 570.262.1778)
Offering classes in traditional karate,
weapons, self defense. Mon-Thurs.,
5:30-8:45 p.m.; Sat., 9 a.m.-noon.
• Zumba Classes: Tues., Thurs., 7-8
p.m.; Sat., 12:30-1:30 p.m. $5/class. Call
for info.
Drawing and Painting Les-
sons: Realist painter teaches tech-
niques of old masters. Private les-
sons Fri.-Sun. To schedule, call
570.820.0469, e-mail [email protected]
hoo.com or visit www.artistvs.com.
Everhart Museum(1901 Mulber-
ry St., Scranton, 570.346.7186,
www.everhart-museum.org)
• “Everybody’s Art” New Series of
Adult Art Classes: $25/workshop
members, $30 non-members. Pre-
registration required.
• Rosen Method easy movement
program, Thurs., 2-3 p.m., Folk art
gallery, $5/class, free to members.
Must pre-register.
• Early Explorers: Mon., 1-1:45 p.m.
Free, suitable for ages 3-5. Pre-
registration required, groups wel-
come. For info, to register, call or
e-mail [email protected]
seum.org.
Fazio’s Hapkido Do Jang (61
Main St., Luzerne, 570.239.1191)
Accepting new students. Children
(age 7-12) Mon./Wed., 5:30-6:30 p.m.
Teen/adult Mon./Wed., 6:45-8:15 p.m.;
Tues.-Thurs., 6:30-8 p.m. Private
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 68
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 65
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lesson also available.
Learn Hapkido. Self defense applica-
tions. $50 monthly, no contract.
Hazleton Art League (225 E.
Broad St., Hazleton, 570.454.0092,
Hazletonsartleague.org)
• Figure Drawing Class: through
April 30, Mon., 4-7 p.m. Call
570.453.1337 for info.
Harris Conservatory for the
Arts (545 Charles St. Luzerne,
570.287.7977 or 718.0673)
• Instrumental Music Instruction
• Private Ballroom Lessons
• Private Vocal Instruction: Tues.
evenings.
• Private Guitar Instruction: Classi-
cal, acoustic, electric for all ages.
• Dragons’ Tale Karate: Mon., 5:30-7
p.m.; Wed., 6-7:30 p.m. Ages 5+.
• Tumbling: Fri., 5:30-6:30 p.m. Ages
5+. $30/month.
Horse Back Riding Lessons
Elk Stables, Uniondale, by appoint-
ment only. All levels welcome. Call
570.575.8649 to schedule.
Kiss Theatre Company (58
Wyoming Valley Mall, Wilkes-Barre,
570.829.1901, kisstheatre.org)
❏ Spring/Summer 2012 workshops:
• Frog And Toad: Sat., 10 a.m.-noon,
starts April 28. Ages 4-10. Perform-
ances in July. $250 + $50 admin fee.
Kwonkodo Lessons – by reser-
vation at The Hapkido Teakwondo
Institute (210 Division St., Kingston).
$40/month. Call 570.287.4290 for
info.
NEPA Bonsai Society (Midway
Garden Center, 1865 Hwy. 315, Pitt-
ston, 570.654.6194, www.mys-
pace.com/nepabonsai).
• Monthly meeting last Wed., 7 p.m.
Features business sessions, demon-
strations/programs/workshops.
Northeast Photography Club
(www.northeastphotographyclub.org)
meets first Wed. of month 7 p.m. in
boardroom of Prime Med (old Wes
Freedman Building) off Morgan Hwy.
Variety of topics, monthly contest,
guest speakers. Membership open.
Olympic Style Fencing classes
at The Fencing Exchange, above AFA
Gallery, 514 Lackawanna Ave., Scran-
ton, Mon.-Thurs. Foil, saber, epee
taught. For info, call 570.969.1224.
Osterhout Library (71 S. Fran-
klin St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.821.1959)
• ESL Class: May 1, 8, 22, 29, 5:30-
6:30 p.m. Adult English as a second
language for non-native speakers.
Free.
❏ Celebrate Money Smart Week:
• Student Loans & Saving for Col-
lege: April 25, 6-7:30 p.m. Wilkes’
Money Matters Club presents ways to
finance college, scholarships, loans,
grants, savings. Free.
• Couponing: Way to Save Money:
April 28, 10 a.m. Free.
Phoenix Performing Arts
Centre (409-411 Main St., Duryea,
570.457.3589, phoenixpac.vpweb-
.com, [email protected])
• Dimensions in Dance w/ Lee La-
Chette: Jazz, tap, ballet for adults &
kids. $10/hour, $5/second class.
E-mail or call 991.1817.
• Vocal lessons w/ Joelle Colombo
Witner: Wed., Sun. E-mail or call
991.1817.
Pocono Arts Council (18 N.
Seventh St., Stroudsburg.
570.476.4460. www.poconoarts.org)
❏ Ongoing Adult Classes
• Oil Painting: April 26, May 10, 17, 24,
31, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $72/members;
$80/non-members; $60/seniors
members; $65/senior non-members.
Materials list.
❏ Adult Classes
• Drawing Workshop: April 25, May 9,
16, 23, 30, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $72/mem-
bers; $80/non-members; $60/senior
members; $65/senior non-members.
Materials list.
• Watercolor Painting: April 30, May
7, 14, 21, 28, 1:30-4:30 p.m. No previous
drawing ability required. $72/mem-
bers; $80/non-members; $60/senior
members; $65/senior non-members.
Materials list.
Royce Gracie Jiu-Jitsu Net-
work, Scranton. Day, evening class-
es for men, women, children. Ongo-
ing classes 6 days/week. Covers
sport, combat, self-defense aspects
of Gracie Jiu-Jitsu. For info visit
gracie-nepa.com or call 570.347.1107.
Shaolin White Crane Fist
(Wyoming)
Teaching traditional Chinese martial
arts of Shaolin White Crane Fist, Wing
Chun Gong Fu, Yang Style Taijiquan,
Qigong-Energy work, Shauijiao-
Chinese Wrestling, more. $35/week,
first week free. Three levels of train-
ing, ages 15+. Contact Master Mike
DiMeglio 570.371.8898.
Sil-LumKung-Fu & Tai-Chi
Academy (509 Pittston Ave.,
Scranton)
• Yang Style Tai-Chi: Taiji Qigong,
Taiji Sequence, Taiji Stationary Push-
ing Hands, Taiji weapons classes. For
info, call Master Mark Seidel,
570.249.1087.
St. Joseph’s School classes
(1627 N. Main Ave., Scranton,
570.963.0500):
• Traditional Weapons Class: Thurs.,
7-9 p.m. Self-defense techniques
using cane, club, short stick, wooden
sword, escrima sticks, more. Learn
history principles, practical use. No
prior martial arts experience. $10/
class.
• Women’s Self-Defense Class: Sat.,
10 a.m.-12 p.m. Self-defense tech-
niques to protect from variety of
attacks. No prior martial arts experi-
ence. Wear loose fitting clothes.
$10/class.
MIND AND BODY
2&4 Hand Drumming Circle
Freestyle drum circle, every second/
fourth Sat., any time between 1-4
p.m., Everything Natural (426 S. State
St., Clarks Summit). All ages, new-
comers, old timers welcome. Hand
drums, percussion provided. Free, no
pressure.
Arts YOUniverse (47 N. Franklin
St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.970.2787,
www.artsyouniverse.com)
❏ Studio J, 2nd floor
• Meditation in tradition of Gurdjieff,
Ospensky: Sun., 12-1 p.m., $5
• Children’s Meditation: Thurs., 6-7
p.m. Ages 9-14, $5
• Tarot Card Readings, by appoint-
ment. $20 first half hour, $10 addi-
tional half hours.
Balance Ultimate Fitness
(Belladaro Prof Bldg, 570.862.2840)
• Early Morning Fitness Bootcamp:
Tues./Thurs., 6:30 a.m.-7:30 a.m., Sat,
9:30 a.m.-10:30 a.m., $15 or 12 classes
for $150.
Bellas Yoga Studio (650 Boule-
vard Ave., Dickson City,
570.307.5000, www.bellasyoga.com,
[email protected]ga.com)
All workshops $15, pre-registration
suggested.
• Sun. Class: 10-11:15 a.m. Features
Alternating Vinyasa style yoga w/
yoga fusion.
Club Fit (1 West Broad St., Hazle-
ton, 570.497.4700, www.clubfithazle-
ton.com)
• Boxing classes w/ Rich Pastorella
(pastorella.net26.net). Mon., 7-8 p.m.
$40/month.
Dietrich Theater, Tunkhan-
nock (60 E. Tioga St., Tunkhannock:
570.996.1500)
• Kundalini Yoga: April 28, May 5, 12,
19, 10-11:30 a.m. Ages 16+. $60/series of
6 classes, $15/single class. Bring yoga
mat, blanket. Call to register.
• Yoga for You: Wed., 10-11:15 a.m.
Series 1: April 25, May 2, 9, 16; Series
2: May 23, 30, June 6, 13, 20, 27,
$60/6 classes, $15/single class. Call to
register.
Egyptian Belly Dance Class-
es with Dianna Shahein. Call
570.343.2033 for various times/
locations. Private/group classes
available.
Goddess Creations Shop &
Gallery (214 Depot St., Clarks Sum-
mit, 570.575.8649, [email protected]
creations.net)
• Tarot Card Readings by Rev.
Whitney Mulqueen by appointment.
Call.
• Tarot Readings: Thurs., 6-9:30 p.m.
at Montrose Inn, Restaurant & Tavern
(26 S. Main St., Montrose). $25 for
15-20 min.
• Monthly astrology workshop with
Holly Avila: first Sun., $45. Call.
Harris Conservatory for the
Arts (545 Charles St. Luzerne,
718.0673)
• Cardio Kickboxing: Wed., 7-8 p.m.;
Sat., 9-10 a.m. $5/class. Call for info.
• Hoop Fitness Techniques: Mon.,
7:30-8:30 p.m. $5/class. Call for info.
Hoop Fitness Classes (whirli-
gighoopers.com)
• Beginner/Intermediate: Mon., 7:30
p.m., Harris Conservatory (545 Char-
les St., Luzerne). $5. Call 718.0673 to
reserve.
• Beginner/Intermediate: Thurs.,
5:30 p.m., Studio 32 (32 Forrest St.,
Wilkes-Barre) $5.
Inner Harmony Wellness
Center (Mercy Hospital General
Services Bldg., 743 Jefferson Ave.,
Scranton, 570.346.4621, www.inner-
harmonywellness.com, peterama-
[email protected])
• Meditation Technique Workshops:
Wed., 6:30 p.m. $15/session. Goal
setting/stress reduction, more. Call
for info/reservation.
Jeet Kune Do Fighting Con-
cepts Teaches theories of move-
ment in Martial Arts. $100/month. Call
instructor Mike DiMeglio for info,
570.371.8898.
Kwon Kodo Lessons: Learn
self-defense system that combines
Korean Martial Arts such as Hapkido,
Taekwondo & Kuk Sool. Lessons held
at Hapkido Taekwondo Institute (150
Welles St., Forty Fort). $40/month.
For info, call 570.287.4290 or visit
htkdi.com.
Leverage Fitness Studio (900
Rutter Ave., Forty Fort, 570.338.2386,
www.leveragetrainingstudio.com)
• Morning Wake-Up Workout: Full
body metabolic, Mon., Wed., Fri.,
7-7:45 a.m.
• Primal Scream Classes: Tues.,
Thurs. 7-8 p.m.
• Inferno: High Intensity Interval
Training: Sat., 10 a.m.
All classes free to members, $10
non-members.
Melt Hot Yoga (#16 Gateway
Shopping Center, Edwardsville,
570.287.3400, melthotyogastu-
dio.com)
• Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m., 5:30 p.m. (90
minutes)
• Tues., Thurs., 4 p.m. (one hour)
• Sat., Sun., 9 a.m., 3 p.m. (90 min-
utes)
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 69
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 66
Color fix
The exhibit “Living in Colour,” featuring work by Denise Tho-
mas, will be on display Friday, May 4 at Marquis Art and Frame
(515 Center St., Scranton). There will be a free meet-the-artist
reception from 6-8:30 p.m. with wine and refreshments in cele-
bration of First Friday.
Thomas is a native of Kingston and teaches art in the Pocono
Mountain School District. She is a painter who works in acrylic
and oil, and she also enjoys digital photography, drawing and
mixed media work.
For more info, call the gallery at 570.344.3313.
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PITTSTON 570.602.7700
MONTAGE 570.414.7700
The Sapphire Salon
KINGSTON 570.714.2323
close up
STEPHANIE KEARNEY
WITH THE MODEL OF THE WEEK
HAIR, MAKEUP, AND WARDROBE
PROVIDED BY
SAPPHIRE SALON AND DAY SPA
BEFORE
Odyssey Fitness (401 Coal St.,
Wilkes-Barre, 570.829.2661, odyssey-
fitnesscenter.com)
• Yoga Classes: Sun., 12:30 p.m.;
Mon., 7:15 a.m.; Tues., 7 a.m., 5 p.m.;
Wed., 8 a.m., 6:30 p.m.; Thurs., 6:30
p.m.; Sat., 10:30 a.m. All levels wel-
come.
• ZumbAtomic: Lil Starz, ages 4-7:
5:30 p.m.; Big Starz, ages 8-12: 6:15
p.m.
Open Your Eyes To Dream
(143 W. Main St., Bloomsburg,
570.239.7520, www.oyetd.com)
❏ Open-Eyed Yoga. Call 394.2251 or
go online for current updates/can-
cellations. E-mail: [email protected]
• Beginner Vinyasa: Mon., 5:30-6:30
p.m.
• Level II Vinyasa: Mon., 7-8:30 p.m.
• Mixed Level Vinyasa: Tues., 9-10:30
a.m., Wed., 6:30-7:45 p.m.
Mats & props available. Student/
package discounts available. Bring
friend to first class, get two for price
of one.
Pocono Yoga & Meditation
Classes (570.472.3272, www.Poco-
noYoga.com) Classes with Suzi,
certified yoga instructor
• Gentle Yoga: Thurs., 6:30 p.m., East
Mountain Apartments. Free to resi-
dents.
• Private Yoga Instruction: Only by
appointment. $35 per hour. Call.
• Private Meditation Instruction:
Only by appointment. $35 per hour.
Call.
Prana Yoga Studio (1112 Wheeler
Ave., Dunmore, 570.341.8886,
www.pranayogadunmore.com) Class-
es taught in vinyasa flow, geared for
all levels
• Mon.: Advanced, 6 p.m.; tai chi
with Blake Wheeler 7:30-8:45 p.m.,
Thurs., 8:45-10 p.m., $45/month, on
class/week, $65/month, two classes/
week. Contact Blake at 434.989.1045
or [email protected] for info.
• Tues.: Beginner, 10 a.m.; Open
Level, noon; Beg./Intermediate, 5:30
p.m.; Intermediate, 7:30 p.m.
• Wed.: Beginner, 5:30 p.m.; Ad-
vanced 7:30 p.m.
• Thurs.: Open Level, 10 a.m.; Beg./
Intermediate, 5:30 p.m.; Intermediate,
7:30 p.m.
• Fri.: Open Level, 10 a.m.; Advanced,
6 p.m.
• Sat.: Beg./Intermediate, 10 a.m.;
Intermediate, noon.
• Sun.: Intermediate, noon; Candle-
lit Open Level, 6 p.m.
Sandy Seyler Studio (House of
Nutrition, 2nd floor, 50 Main St.,
Luzerne, 570.288.1785, SandySeyl-
er.com)
• Emotional Rescue Workshop: May
20, 2-5 p.m. $40.
❏ April Schedule
• Yoga: Mon., 6:30 p.m.; Wed., 10:30
a.m.; Thurs., 7:15 p.m.; Sat., 9:30 a.m.
Multi-level, beginners and intermedi-
ate. Hatha Yoga postures, Pranayam,
deep relaxation. $11. Check web calen-
dar for weather cancellations.
• Meditation: Mon., 10:30 a.m.; Thurs.,
6 p.m. Pranayam/mantra meditation.
No experience necessary. $11. Check
web calendar for weather cancella-
tions.
Studio Brick (118 Walnut St.,
Danville, 570.275.3240)
• All Levels Yoga: Wed. (ongoing),
10-11 a.m.
Symmetry Studio (206 N. Main
Avenue, 3rd Floor, Scranton,
570.290.7242)
• Mon.: Gentle Yoga 5:30 p.m.; Core
Yoga 6:30 p.m.
• Tues.: Beginners Yoga 5 p.m.; Yoga
Strength and Flexibility 6 p.m.; Car-
dio Kickboxing 7:30 p.m.
• Wed.: Slow Flow 5:30 p.m.; Core
Yoga 6:30 p.m.
• Thurs.: All Levels Vinyasa 5:30
p.m.; Cardio Kickboxing 7:30 p.m.
• Fri.: Community Ballroom (call for
registration details)
• Sat.: Prenatal Yoga 9:30 a.m.;
Essential Yoga All Levels 11 a.m.
• Sun.: Slow Flow 11 a.m.
Tarot Readings every Sun., 11
a.m.-5:30 p.m., Shambala, Scranton,
located at Mall At Steamtown, first
floor outside Bonton. By Whitney
Mulqueen. Walk-ins welcome. Info:
570.575.8649, 344.4385, find Sham-
bala on Facebook.
[email protected]
hoo.comIndividual attention for
physical/spiritual advancement. All
levels welcome. Call 570.709.2406 for
info. Classes held at The Studio at 32
(32 Forrest St., Wilkes-Barre) Sat.,
10:30 a.m.-noon.
The Vintage Theater (119 Penn
Avenue, Scranton, 570.589.0271,
www.scrantonsvintagetheater.com)
• The Ellen Doyle Dance Experience:
Tues., 8-10 p.m., ft. strength training,
cardio, stretching, dance warm-up
classics. Free and open to the public,
wear dance shoes/socks, bring yoga
mat/water.
Waering Stained Glass Stu-
dio (336 N. Washington St., Wilkes-
Barre).
• Tarot Card Readings: $50/first half
hour, $10 additional. Appointment
only. Call 570.417.5020.
White Dragon Internal
Strength Chi Kung (330 Sandra
Dr., Jefferson Twp & Scranton,
570.906.9771) Tai chi, yoga, med-
itation, chi kung, white lotus, pai lum,
flowing water, inner tiger. Beginners-
advanced. Mon.-Fri., open 6 a.m.-10
p.m. Sat. 8 a.m.-9 p.m. Sun 9 a.m.-5
p.m. Private and group. Any ages.
Whole Earth 7th Annual
2012 Holistic & Psychic Fair
([email protected]) April 28,
10 a.m.-6 p.m., April 29, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Hilton Garden Inn (242 Highland Park
Blvd., Wilkes-Barre Twp.). $3, under 12
free. Kirilain photography, holistic
body workers, massage therapy/
reiki, gemstones, more.
Wilkes-Barre YMCA events
(570.823.2191)
• Membership Special: Beginning
New members joining in April, one-
time enrollment fee will be cut in
half, get $50 credit toward program
of choice.
• Zumbatomic: Sat., 1 p.m. $16/8
week session for YMCA members,
$20/non-members. Designed for ages
7-12, now offering parent class.
Pre-registration required.
• Healthy Kids Day: April 28, 10
a.m.-2 p.m. Vendors, activities for
children/families. Any adult or family
purchasing an annual membership
this day will receive the first month
free.
The Yoga Studio (210 Wyoming
Ave., Wyoming, 570.301.7544)
• Yoga: Mon., 9:30 a.m., 6:30 p.m.;
Wed., 10:30 a.m.; Thurs., 9:30 a.m.,
6:30 p.m.; Sat., 10:30 a.m.
• Zumba: Tues., 5:30 p.m.; Wed. 9
a.m., 7 p.m.; Fri., 5:30 p.m.
YMCA of Greater Pittston (10
N Main St, Pittston, 570.655.2255 ext.
104, [email protected]
ca.org)
• Early Tikes Gymnastics: Wed.,
9-9:30 a.m. $30.
• Just 3’s: Wed., 9:45-10:15 a.m. $30.
• Twinkie Fitness: Thurs., 5:15-6 p.m.,
$30. Age 4.
• Beginner Gymnastics: Young
beginner (ages 5-7), Sat., 9-9:45 a.m.;
beginner (ages 7+), Sat., 10-10:45 a.m.;
intermediate (ages 10+), Sat., 11 a.m.-
noon. $40/member, $30/family
member, $55/non-members.
• Basketball: Beginner (kindergar-
ten, grades1-2), Tues., 5:30- 6:15 p.m.
• Basketball Basics: (grades 3-5)
Tues., 6:30-7:30 p.m. $50/members,
$40/family member, $65/non-mem-
bers.
• Basketball and Softball: Tee Ball
(ages 5-6), Sat., 9-9:45 a.m.; pre-
minors baseball (ages 7-10), Sat., 10-11
a.m.; pre-minors softball (ages 7-10),
Sat., 11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m., $50/members,
$40/family members, $65/non-
members.
OUTSIDE
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 70
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 68
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Enter your pet for Weekender’s
PET OFTHEWEEK
by sending photo, pet’s name, breed
if applicable, owner’s name and
hometown to:
[email protected]
subject line: Pet of the Week
Owner:
Bruce Ridilla, Swoyersville
ARIES AND
ATHENA
Adventures in the Wilder-
ness (570.343.5144 or [email protected]
jane.com)
❏ Greater Scranton YMCA outings (Y
members/$5, non-members/$8):
• Big Pine Hill (Thornhurst): April 29,
9:15 a.m., meet Y parking lot, Dun-
more. 4 miles moderate.
• Woodbourne Sanctuary (Mon-
trose): May 6, 9:15 a.m., meet Y park-
ing lot, Dunmore. 5 miles steep.
❏ Senior Citizens Outings (Y mem-
bers/$5, non-members/$8):
• Kirby Dike (Wilkes-Barre): April 26,
9 a.m., meet Y lobby, Dunmore.
Widmann Art Gallery, Kings College
campus, Katana. 3 miles easy.
• Drakes Creek (Lake Harmony): May
10, 9 a.m., meet Y lobby, Dunmore. 3
miles moderate. Tokyo Tea House.
Endless Mountains Nature
Center: (Camp Lackawanna, Tunk-
hannock, 570.836.3835, www.EMN-
Conline.org)
• Bird ID for Beginners: April 26,
6:30-8:30 p.m., Tunkhannock Public
Library. Adults, serious teens only.
Free.
• Bird Watching Walks: April 27, 8-11
a.m. Bring binoculars, field guide.
Free.
❏ Programs for Homeschool/Cyber
School Families (For registration
info, program schedule, calendar of
events, go online or call):
• “Wetlands & Salamanders:” April
25, 9:30 a.m.-noon. Kindergarten-high
school. $6/student, $3/parent. Regis-
tration deadline one week in ad-
vance.
Frances Slocum State Park
(565 Mt. Olivet Road, Wyoming,
570.696.9105)
• Move it Outside Hike: April 25, 6
p.m., meet gravel parking area at
bottom of campground road, not
suitable for baby strollers.
Hickory Run State Park (1137
Honey Hole Road, 570.403.2006)
• 2012 Hickory Run: April 26, 9 a.m.
Northern section Lehigh Gorge Rail
Trail, 3 miles, meet park access at
intersection of Main/Susquehanna
St., White Haven.
Lacawac Sanctuary (94 Sanc-
tuary Rd., Lake Ariel, 570.689.9494,
[email protected])
• Walk in the Woods with Nathaniel
Whitmore in Search of Edible Plants:
April 28, 1 p.m. Small fee. Registration
recommended.
• “All About Wildlife:” April 29, 10
a.m. Family friendly, hands-on. Regis-
tration recommended.
Nescopeck State Park (1137
Honey Hole Rd., Drums,
570.403.2006) All events free, unless
noted otherwise. Reservations re-
quired.
• Move It Outside Day Guided Hike:
April 25, 6-8 p.m., meet park office.
Leisurely 2-mile walk. Wear sturdy
shoes, bring water/snack.
• Spring Into Action Park Cleanup:
April 28, 9 a.m.-noon, meet park
office. Register your group so pro-
jects can be planned accordingly,
specify if you’re bringing younger
helpers.
• Plant Swap: May 5, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Exchange extra/unwanted plants.
Native plants encouraged, not re-
quired.
• Wildflower Walk: May 6, 10-11:30 a.m.
1 mile. Free.
Salt Springs State Park
(Montrose, 570.967.7275, www.friend-
sofsaltspringspark.org)
To register for classes, call
570.833.4034
• Salt Springs Roadside Cleanup:
May 5, 9 a.m.
Scranton Ghost Walk (Scran-
tonGhostTours.com, 570.383.1821)
• Daily, 90-minute tours, usually
7:30 p.m., 9 p.m. $20/adults, $15/
under 11. Rain or shine. Reservations
required. Secret meeting place
divulged upon reservation. Daytime
walks available on limited basis. Call
to reserve.
Wallenpaupack Scenic Boat
Tour 11 a.m.-6 p.m., $14/regular,
$13/senior, $10/12 and under. Cele-
brating 50th year on the lake with
daily one-hour cruises. Info:
570.226.3293, wallenpaupackboat-
tour.com.
SOCIAL GROUPS
Alcohol Anonymous: Mon./Fri 7
p.m. (373 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre),
Tue. 7 p.m. (25 Church St., Wilkes-
Barre), Wed. 10:15 a.m. (301 Shoemaker
St., Swoyersville), 7 p.m. (1000 E.
Mountain Blvd., Wilkes-Barre), 8 p.m.
(562 Wyoming Ave., Kingston), Thurs.
10 a.m. (75 S. Prospect St., Nanti-
coke), 7:30 p.m. (301 Lake St., Dallas),
Fri. 7:30 p.m. (Triangle 24 Hour Club,
Dallas), Sat. 7:30 p.m. (1003 Wyoming
Ave., Forty Fort), Sun. 7 p.m. (128 W.
Washington St., Nanticoke). Call
570.288.9892 for info.
Food Addicts Anonymous
Meetings (St. Vincent DePaul
Church, Scranton: 570.344.7866)
Meetings every Fri. night, 8 p.m.
Geisinger Wyoming Valley
(Kistler Learning Center Specialty
Clinic, 1000 E. Mountain Blvd., Wilkes-
Barre)
• Geisinger Partners in Pediatrics
Forty Fort: Free Asthma Screening:
May 1, 2-6 p.m., Geisinger Partners in
Pediatrics, Forty Fort Clinic (180
Welles St., Suite 122, Forty Fort).
Monroe County Garden Club
• Donate/Plant Cleveland Pear Tree
at Dansbury Depot, S. Kistler St.,
Analomink St., East Stroudsburg:
April 25, 11 a.m. Info: 570.420.0283,
[email protected]
• 85th Anniversary Celebration: May
9, 11:30 a.m., Chateau Resort and
Conference Center, Tannersville.
$20/person, register by April 30.
Roaring Twenties Tea Party, tea
luncheon, raffle, best dressed award.
Encouraged to dress in period cos-
tume, presentation on herbal crafts.
Info: 570.420.0283, [email protected]
Narcotic Anonymous Meet-
ings every Tues. at 7 p.m., down-
stairs in the Methodist Education
Building, located off Courthouse
Square, on the corner of Marion and
Warren Street in Tunkhannock. There
are no fees or dues. Newcomers
always welcome.
The NEPA Rainbow Alliance
(www.gaynepa.com)
• As part of the NEPA SafeZone
Project, NEPA RA is creating an “It
Gets Better” video. Video features
local representatives from the LGBT
community, allies and more offering
words of encouragement. To be a
sponsor, e-mail [email protected]
pa.com; to be in the video, visit
gaynepa.com for details/application.
• NEPA Rainbow Awards Gala: April
28, 5-11 p.m., Radisson Lackawanna
Station Hotel (700 Lackawanna Ave.,
Scranton). $75.
Oakwood Terrace (400 Gleason
Dr., Moosic, 570.451.3171 ext. 116 or 101)
• Support Group Meetings: third
Wed. of each month, 6:30 p.m.
Overeaters Anon. meetings
Mon., Tues., Thurs., 7 p.m.; Wed., 7:30
p.m.; Sat., 10 a.m. No fee, newcomers
welcome. Call 570.829.1341 for details/
meeting locations of visit
www.oa.org.
Weight Watchers 8-Week
Program Thurs., 5:45-6:45 p.m.,
Mountainview Community Church (N.
Lehigh Church Road, White Haven).
Upfront fee $84. Registrants will be
contacted with exact date. Call
570.443.7618 or 262.6418.
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Re-
solve Infertility Peer Sup-
port Group: Last Sun. of month,
6:30-8 p.m., Kistler Learning Center
at Geisinger Wyoming Valley. Contact
Jennifer for info, 610.393.8098. W
- compiled by Amanda
Riemensnyder, Weekender
Intern
Send your listings to
[email protected],
90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre,
PA18703 or fax to 570.831.7375
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 69
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TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20)
You are not widely known for your
ability to compromise — for good reason.
You rarely do it, you stubborn Bull. But
that doesn’t mean you’re not capable of it
when there’s compelling reasons to do so.
However, because you’re not practiced at
bending in these particular directions, you
might need a little help from an unbiased
third party who can help you and your
“negotiating partner” come to a reasonably
happy agreement and call you out when
you’re just plain being unrealistic or unfair
(which is bound to happen once or twice).
This can be an easy conversation if you
include the right people. Please do.
GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20)
Most of you are upstanding ethical
human beings almost all of the time. But
generally every Gemini has had a moment
or two in their life where they wanted
something so badly that they at least seri-
ously considered using whatever methods
they could imagine to get what they desir-
ed. It’s nothing to be ashamed of. You
wouldn’t be the first person who struggled
with the urge to allow the ends to justify
the means. But hopefully if a moment like
that occurs in the near future, you’re now
wise enough to know that getting what you
want by doing something you’re not proud
of pretty much ruins it. Get it legitimately
or not at all.
CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22)
It’s one thing to indulge in a brownie.
Other kinds of temptations, however, carry
with them more dire consequences. It’s
easy to allow the compelling quality of
whatever (or whoever) is in front of you to
eclipse all those ramifications, but this
week you must carefully look past its
delightfulness at what will probably hap-
pen sooner or later if you go there. It’s a
little less wonderful now, isn’t it? You
should have the kind of maturity right now
to take in this big picture, and keep your
life on track — or if you decide to take it
off the rails it’s been on, to do so with your
eyes wide open.
LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22)
Over time, you’ve concocted rules for
yourself and how you deal with relation-
ships, particularly romantic ones. Most (or
perhaps even all) of these rules are sen-
sible, logical and based on your own expe-
rience and self-knowledge. Here’s the
thing, though. People change (even you),
sometimes without even noticing it. Some
of those rules might no longer apply.
What’s also true is that, like it or not, they
may also be keeping you from experiences
you’d be better off having. Experiment
with breaking a rule or two now and again,
just to make sure they’re still worth abid-
ing by. You may be very glad you did.
VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22)
When your problem has a simple, attain-
able solution, don’t resist using it just
because it doesn’t conform to how you
originally wanted to address this problem
or match up with what you consider an
ideal solution. Don’t be a masochist (if
you can help it). Why make life more
complicated for yourself? It has enough
unavoidable tangles as it is. Since unravel-
ing this one is as simple as making a
phone call or throwing a small amount of
money at it, I’d say embrace the simplicity
and effectiveness and take pleasure in
crossing this quandary off your list.
LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22)
Libras, while excellent mediators for
others’ conflicts, tend to avoid ones where
you’re directly involved, because that’s
when stuff gets messy and unpleasant, and
your diplomatic powers do you no good
whatsoever. Unfortunately, as hard as you
try, you can’t be agreeable all the time and
just go along with whatever’s happening.
Sometimes it’s important for you to take a
stand and stick up for what you believe in
or want to do. The important thing to
remember is to stick to your guns once you
pull them out of their holsters. If you back
down at the first sign of trouble, you might
as well not bother; go buy a T-shirt with
the label “Doormat” instead.
SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21)
Never apologize for how deeply you
care about the loves in your life. It might
freak some people out or scare others off,
but that’s their problem, not yours. View
them with compassion — their bullshit
comes from being afraid or maybe for
never having deeply loved anyone or any-
thing. In that case, showing them how to
passionately be into someone or some-
thing is the coolest thing you can do. Be an
example. The end result can only be more
love (and yes, probably more sex) in the
world — and that’s got to be a good thing.
SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21)
Being the unapologetic truth-teller you
are, playing the role of squeaky wheel,
when necessary, comes naturally to you.
Keep playing it. But recognize that your
candor has put you in the very cool posi-
tion of saying nice things about others and
having it seem like more than just a lot of
ass-kissing hot air. Just imagine how much
more lovely our world would be if people
dished out more compliments than com-
plaints. Help bring us closer to that sweet
spot by singing the praises of everything
great in your life this week and onwards
into the future.
CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19)
Occasionally, when we start having
those feelings that the grass is greener
elsewhere, it’s because we actually do
regret the path we’ve chosen and would be
happier elsewhere. But most of the time
it’s because we idealize that other place,
and the truth is, if we got there, we’d be
just as unhappy. Most of the sources of
your own discontent are internal, not ex-
ternal. That may be hard to wrap your
head around and even harder to do any-
thing about; nevertheless, learning how to
simply be happy where you are instead of
fantasizing about being somewhere else is
this week’s task.
AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18)
A wonderful thing about you, Aquarius,
is that you find it easier than most to keep
your eyes on the big picture and rarely
make mountains of molehills based on
your own emotional response. As you’ve
surely observed, however, some people
lack this knack. They somehow make
everything about them, and there’s not
much you can do to successfully redirect
their attention to the situation that’s actual-
ly happening instead of the self-obsessed
scenario inside their heads. Of course,
sometimes you have to work with these
people despite the annoyance and hassle.
Fortunately this week isn’t one of those
times. When they get stuck in their self-
rut, just leave them to it. Walk away.
PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20)
Sometimes when you’re done, you’re
done. It would’ve been nice if you could
have realized this earlier and possibly said
or done something to avoid ending up
here. But occasionally you don’t realize
you’ve crossed the point of no return until
it’s already miles behind you. If that’s
happened, recognize that there’s no salvag-
ing this situation (for you), and be as kind
as possible — which may involve brutally
and finally dashing anyone else’s hopes of
altering the outcome. It’s not fair that it’s
too late for that, but that doesn’t change
the fact that it really is simply too late for
that.
ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL19)
One of the best things about you is your
ability to surprise people with unexpected
layers and facets of your personality. At
times you seem endearingly focused and
simple, like a loveable cartoon character.
So it’s delightful when you reveal your
many other aspects and depths. This week,
those are your secret weapons. Your sin-
gle-mindedness up until now has set you
up perfectly to delight and amaze with the
wonderful versatility you’re going to dis-
play this week. Be flattered, not insulted,
by their shock, and they’ll be that much
more impressed. Go on, Aries. Get out
there and rock some worlds. W
To contact Caeriel, e-mail
[email protected]
By Caeriel Crestin
Weekender Correspondent
RENEE ZELLWEGER
April 25 1969
KEVIN JAMES
(pictured)
April 26 1965
PATRICK STUMP
April 27 1984
JESSICA ALBA
April 28 1981
UMA THURMAN
April 29 1970
WILLIE NELSON
April 30 1933
TIM MCGRAW
May 1 1967
sign language
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motorhead
Ride of
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By Michael Golubiewski
Special to the Weekender
1980
FORD MUSTANG
Engine:
4.2 liter, 8-cylinder
Owner:
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“All my life I have loved Mustangs,”
says Rosica, who bought his Mustang
about 10 years ago. “They are, to me,
the ultimate American car. I have loved
every minute of driving it. I have tried to
keep it as near original as possible.” W
show us some skin
Name: Jeff Colarusso
Town: Hanover Twp.
E-mail a photo of your tattoo (at least 200 dpi) with your full name,
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Must be 18 to participate
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April Cook &
Kris Arthur,
Hazleton
Curt & Rebecca
Palmer,
Shavertown
Michelle Belles
& Randall Jones,
Lehman
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100 Announcements
200 Auctions
300 Personal Services
400 Automotive
500 Employment
600 Financial
700 Merchandise
800 Pets & Animals
900 Real Estate
1000 Service Directory
MARKETPLACE
To place a Classified ad: Call 570-829-7130 or 1-800-273-7130 Email: classifi[email protected]
theweekender.com
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
ALL JUNK
VEHICLES
WANTED!!
CALL ANYTIME
HONEST PRICES
FREE REMOVAL
CA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
WANTED
ALL JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
DUMPTRUCKS
BULLDOZERS
BACKHOES
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call
Vito & Ginos
Anytime
288-8995
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
120 Found
FOUND. Male cat.
Black. white on
face, neck, stomach
& paws. Very friend-
ly. Found in Plains
Call 570-822-8701
120 Found
FOUND: adult gray,
fluffy female cat in
Duryea area. Yellow
eyes, very friendly.
570-457-3983
150 Special Notices
P PA AYING $500 YING $500
MINIMUM
DRIVEN IN
Full size 4 wheel
drive trucks
ALSO PAYING TOP $$$
for heavy equip-
ment, backhoes,
dump trucks,
bull dozers
HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
542-2277
6am to 8pm
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
310 Attorney
Services
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
*Unemployment
Hearing?
*Sued by Credit
Card Company?
*Charged with
DUI? *Sued for
Custody or Child
Support? Call the
Law office of
Michael P. Kelly
570-417-5561
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
HAWK 2011 UTILITY ATV
NEW!! Full size
adult ATV. Strong 4
stroke motor. CVT
fully automatic
transmission with
reverse. Electric
start. Front & rear
luggage racks.
Long travel suspen-
sion. Disc brakes.
Dual stage head
lights. Perfect for
hunters & trail rid-
ers alike. BRAND NEW
& READY TO RIDE.
$1,995 takes it
away.
570-817-2952
Wilkes-Barre
TOMAHAWK`11
ATV, 110 CC. Brand
New Tomahawk
Kids Quad. Only
$695 takes it away!
570-817-2952
Wilkes-Barre
412 Autos for Sale
DODGE `00 DURANGO
SPORT
4.7 V8, 4WD, 3rd
row seat, runs
good, needs body
work $1900.
570-902-5623
HONDA ‘08 ACCORD
4 door, EXL with
navigation system.
4 cyl, silver w/
black interior. Satel-
lite radio, 6CD
changer, heated
leather seats, high,
highway miles. Well
maintained. Monthly
service record
available. Call Bob.
570-479-0195
412 Autos for Sale
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
ALL
JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
JAGUAR `00 S TYPE
4 door sedan. Like
new condition. Bril-
liant blue exterior
with beige hides.
Car is fully equipped
with navigation sys-
tem, V-8, automatic,
climate control AC,
alarm system,
AM/FM 6 disc CD,
garage door open-
er. 42,000 original
miles. $9,000
Call (570) 288-6009
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
VOLKSWAGEN ‘00
BEETLE
2.0 automatic, air
67k miles $6400.
570-466-0999
412 Autos for Sale
TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA GT
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVY ‘30 HOTROD COUPE
$49,000
FORD ‘76 THUNDERBIRD
All original $12,000
MERCEDES ‘76 450 SL
$24,000
MERCEDES ‘29
Kit Car $9,000
(570) 655-4884
hell-of-adeal.com
To place your
ad call...829-7130
DESOTO CUSTOM
‘49 4 DOOR SEDAN
3 on the tree with
fluid drive. This All
American Classic
Icon runs like a top
at 55MPH. Kin to
Chrysler, Dodge,
Plymouth, Imperial
Desoto, built in the
American Midwest,
after WWII, in a
plant that once
produced B29
Bombers. In it’s
original antiquity
condition, with
original shop &
parts manuals,
she’s beautifully
detailed and ready
for auction in Sin
City. Spent her
entire life in Ari-
zona and New
Mexico, never saw
a day of rain or
rust. Only $19,995.
To test drive, by
appointment only,
Contact Tony at
570-899-2121 or
[email protected]
gmail.com
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
FORD `52
COUNTRY SEDAN
CUSTOM LINE
STATION WAGON
V8, automatic,
8 passenger,
3rd seat, good
condition, 2nd
owner. REDUCED TO
$6,500.
570-579-3517
570-455-6589
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
MERCEDES 1975
Good interior &
exterior. Runs
great! New tires.
Many new parts.
Moving, Must Sell.
$1,300 or
best offer
570-362-3626
Ask for Lee
MERCEDES-BENZ
`73 450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. Reduced
price to $26,000.
Call 570-825-6272
MERCURY `79
ZEPHYR
6 cylinder
automatic.
52k original miles.
Florida car. $1500.
570-899-1896
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
OLDSMOBILE
`68
DELMONT
Must Sell!
Appraised
for $9,200
• All original
45,000 miles
• 350 Rocket
engine
• Fender skirts
• Always
garaged
Will sell for
$6,000
Serious
inquires only
570-
690-0727
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY ‘08 3500
HD DUMP TRUCK
2WD, automatic.
Only 12,000 miles.
Vehicle in like
new condition.
$19,000.
570-288-4322
439 Motorcycles
BMW ‘07 K1200 GT
Low mileage. Many
extras. Clean.
$9,000
(570) 646-2645
BMW 2010 K1300S
Only 460 miles! Has
all bells & whistles.
Heated grips, 12 volt
outlet, traction con-
trol, ride adjustment
on the fly. Black with
lite gray and red
trim. comes with
BMW cover, battery
tender, black blue
tooth helmet with
FM stereo and black
leather riding gloves
(like new). paid
$20,500. Sell for
$15,000 FIRM.
Call 570-262-0914
Leave message.
439 Motorcycles
HARLEY ‘07
SCREAMING EAGLE
DYNA
Assembled by
Custom Vehicle
Operations. Very
Unique, Fast Bike.
1800cc. 10,000
miles. Performance
Rinehart pipes,
comfortable
Mustang seat with
back rest and
detachable rack ,
Kuryakyn pegs and
grips, color
matched frame, SE
heavy breather air
filter comes with
HD dust cover and
gold CVO owners
key. Excellent
condition. Silver
Rush/ Midnight
Black. Asking
$13,500
Call Ron @
570- 868-3330
HARLEY ‘10 DAVIDSON
SPORTSTER CUSTOM
Loud pipes.
Near Mint
174 miles - yes,
One hundred and
seventy four
miles on the
clock, original
owner. $8000.
570-876-2816
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
HARLEY 2011
HERITAGE SOFTTAIL
Black. 1,800 miles.
ABS brakes. Securi-
ty System Package.
$15,000 firm.
SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY
570-704-6023
HARLEY DAVIDSON `07
Road King Classic
FLHRC. Burgundy /
Cream. 6 speed.
Cruise control. Back
rests, grips, battery
tender, cover. Willie
G accessories.
19,000miles. $13,250.
Williamsport, PA
262-993-4228
MATTIE
AUTOMOTIVE
220 Bennett
Street, Luzerne
Motorcycle State
Inspection,
Tire Sales &
Maintenance
570-283-1098
Wanna make your
car go fast? Place
an ad in Classified!
570-829-7130.
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412 Autos for Sale
515 Creative/Design
412 Autos for Sale
515 Creative/Design
412 Autos for Sale
515 Creative/Design
412 Autos for Sale
515 Creative/Design
412 Autos for Sale
515 Creative/Design
412 Autos for Sale
515 Creative/Design
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
468 Auto Parts
515 Creative/Design
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
468 Auto Parts
Discover an exceptional opportunity
to deliver quality healthcare to
America’s Veterans.
The Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center is currently recruiting for the
following position at the Medical Center:
In addition to an attractive salary, we offer vacation/sick leave, health and life insurance coverage and a retirement package including a tax deferred savings plan.
Interested applicants MUST apply at www.usajobs.gov to vacancy number 693-12-CLP-633107.
For additional information please call (570) 824-3521, extension 7887.
DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS
VA MEDICAL CENTER
1111 EAST END BOULEVARD
WILKES-BARRE, PA 18711
THE VA IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.
INTERIOR DESIGNER
Responsible for performing all major duties in order to provide a complete Interior Design
Program at the Wilkes-Barre VA Medical Center and its associated outpatient facilities
ensuring an environment conducive to healing.
D on’t w a it
for g a sp r ice s
to re a ch $5.00 / g a llon
G e t you r V E SP A now
a nd SAV E $$$ a t
TE A M E F F O RT CY CL E
12 80 Sa nsSouciPk w y,H a noverTw p,Pa .1870 6
570 -82 5-4581 w w w .tea m effortcycle.com
Two person crew, no experience necessary,
company will train. The work is outdoor,
fast-paced, very physical and will require the
applicant to be out of town for eight day intervals
followed by six days off. Applicants must have a
valid PA drivers license and clean driving record.
Starting wage is negotiable but will be no less than
$14.00 per with family health, dental and 401k.
ENTRY LEVEL
CONSTRUCTION LABORER
Apply at R.K. Hydro-Vac, Inc.
1075 Oak St., Pittston, PA 18640
E-mail resume to:
[email protected]
or call 800-237-7474
Monday to Friday8:30 to 4:30
E.O.E. and Mandatory Drug Testing.
BUYING JUNK
VEHICLES
$300 AND UP
$125 EXTRA IF DRIVEN,
DRAGGED OR PUSHED IN!
NOBODY Pays More
570-760-2035
Monday thru Saturday 6am-9pm • Happy Trails!
439 Motorcycles
SUZUKI ‘01 VS 800
GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no
rust, lots of
chrome, black with
teal green flake.
Includes storage
jack & 2 helmets.
$3600
570-410-1026
439 Motorcycles
YAMAHA ‘97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
Find A NewFriend
In The Times Leader Classified
To place an ad call 829-7130
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542 Logistics/
Transportation
548 Medical/Health
542 Logistics/
Transportation
548 Medical/Health
542 Logistics/
Transportation
542 Logistics/
Transportation
542 Logistics/
Transportation
548 Medical/Health
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
542 Logistics/
Transportation
548 Medical/Health
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
542 Logistics/
Transportation
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1298 Keystone Blvd.
Pottsville, PA 17901
Phone: 570-544-3140 • Fax: 570-544-8084
Fanelli Brothers Trucking has established a new and increased driver pay package and an
increased sign on bonus. Due to additional business, Fanelli Bros. Trucking Co. is adding
both regional and local drivers to our Pottsville, PA terminal operation. Drivers are home
most nights throughout the week. Drivers must have 2-3 years of OTR experience,
acceptable MVR and pass a criminal background check.
• .38 cpm for qualified drivers • $1,500 sign on bonus
• Paid vacations and holidays
• Health/Dental/Vision Insurance • 401K Plan
Contact Gary Potter at
570-544-3140, Ext. 156
or visit us at
1298 Keystone Blvd. • Pottsville, PA
Full-Time
Therapeutic Staff
Support Workers
(Experience working with
male adolescents beneficial)
Bachelor’s Degree/Associate Degree in
Human Services. Provide 1:1
interventions & support to children.
Full-time benefits include:
competitive pay, health insurance,
paid holidays and vacation days.
Please send, fax or e-mail your
resume & letter of interest to:
Children’s Behavioral
Health Services, Inc.
has immediate openings for:
BEHAVIORAL SPECIALIST
CONSULTANTS
Must have a Master’s Degree
in a Clinical field.
Children’s Behavioral
Health Services, Inc.
Attn: Susan Hurd
104 Woodward Hill Road
Edwardsville PA 18704
Email [email protected]
or Fax to 714-7231
EOE
NOW HIRING CLASS A
OTR DRIVERS
Van Hoekelen Greenhouses is a family owned
business located in McAdoo, PA. We have
immediate openings for reliable full-time
tractor trailer drivers, to deliver product to our
customers across the 48 states. Our premier
employment package includes:
PLEASE CONTACT SHARON AT
800-979-2022 EXT 1914,
Mail resume to P.O. Box 88, McAdoo, PA
18237 or Fax to 570-929-2260
Visit our website at
www.vhgreenhouses.com
for more details.
Requirements are: Valid Class A CDL, minimum 1 year OTR
experience, must lift 40lbs, and meet driving and criminal
record guidelines
• Hourly Pay- including paid detention time,
and guaranteed 8 hours per day
• Safety Bonus - $.05/mile paid quarterly
• Great Benefits - 100% paid health insurance,
vision, dental, life, STD, 401K, vacation time,
and holiday pay.
• Pet & Rider Program
• Well maintained freightliners and reefer trailers
• Continuous year-round steady work with home
time
Do you wake up every day excited about what
you do for a living? Did you become a
Caregiver because you have a true calling to
care for those who need help? If you answered
yes, call Visiting Angels today!
We have opportunities for you.
Visiting Angels is looking for
Caregivers for 1st, 2nd and 3rd shifts.
Immediate shifts available and must work
one weekend a month.
Regular duties of a Caregiver may include:
• Providing companionship
•Assisting with bathing, dressing and grooming
• Running errands and providing transportation
• Light housekeeping such as laundry,
dishes and vacuuming
• Meal preparation • Medication reminders.
We offer flexibility, competitive wages,
weekend shift differential and a friendly
and supportive staff.
Come join the Visiting Angels team
and make a difference!
Call 570-270-6703 or email
[email protected]
“Invisible Fence” technology keeps dogs
safer. Training is provided to operate
ditch witch and install underground
wire and components. Full time physical
job. Must have good math skills, clean
driving record and be courteous.
Must pass physical & drug test.
Invisible Fence Installer
Call or email Brian at Harvis
Interview Service for application
or questions: 542-5330 or
[email protected]
439 Motorcycles
HARLEY DAVIDSON
‘80
Soft riding FLH.
King of the High-
way! Mint origi-
nal antique show
winner. Factory
spot lights, wide
white tires,
biggest Harley
built. Only
28,000 original
miles! Never
needs inspec-
tion, permanent
registration.
$7,995 OBO
570-905-9348
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
442 RVs & Campers
FLAGSTAFF `08
CLASSIC
NOW BACK IN PA.
Super Lite Fifth
Wheel. LCD/DVD
flat screen TV, fire-
place, heated mat-
tress, ceiling fan,
Hide-a-Bed sofa,
outside speakers &
grill, 2 sliders,
aluminum wheels, ,
awning, microwave
oven, tinted safety
glass windows,
fridge & many
accessories &
options. Excellent
condition, $22,500.
570-868-6986
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHRYSLER `02
TOWN & COUNTRY
Luxury people
mover! 87,300 well
maintained miles.
This like-new van
has third row seat-
ing, power side &
rear doors. Eco-
nomical V6 drive-
train and all avail-
able options. Priced
for quick sale
$6,295. Generous
trade-in allowances
will be given on this
top-of-the-line vehi-
cle. Call Fran
570-466-2771
Scranton
REDUCED! REDUCED!
FORD `10 F150
BLACK KING RANCH
4X4 LARIAT 145”
WB STYLESIDE
5.4L V8 engine
Electronic
6 speed auto-
matic. Brown
leather “King
Ranch” interior.
Heat/cool front
seats. Power
moonroof, rear
view camera,
18” aluminum
wheels, tow
package,
navigation
system.
23,000 miles.
Asking $30,000
Call Jeff @
570-829-7172
FORD ‘02 EXPLORER
Red, XLT, Original
non-smoking owner,
garaged, synthetic
oil since new, excel-
lent in and out. New
tires and battery.
90,000 miles.
$7,500
(570) 403-3016
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
GMC `01 JIMMY
Less than 5,000
miles on engine.
4WD. Power acces-
sories. Inspected.
Runs great. $4,500
or best offer. Call
570-696-9518 or
570-690-3709
GMC `05 SAVANA
1500 Cargo Van.
AWD. V8 automatic.
A/C. New brakes &
tires. Price reduced
$10,250. Call
570-474-6028
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542 Logistics/
Transportation
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
VAN DRIVERS –
TRANSPORTATION AIDES
The Luzerne County Transportation Authority is
accepting applications for PART TIME VAN
DRIVERS and PART TIME AIDES for Sum-
mer programs . These positions are responsible
for assisting van clients with transportation to
area Summer Camps. Applicants must be 18
years or over, Driver applicants must have valid
PA Drivers License. All applicants must pass a
pre-employment drug screen, background check
and complete training program.
Applications are available at LCTA, 315
Northampton Street, Kingston, PA 18704
The Luzerne County Transportation
Authority is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
MERCURY `03
MOUNTAINEER
AWD. Third row
seating. Economical
6 cylinder automat-
ic. Fully loaded with
all available options.
93k pampered miles.
Garage kept. Safety /
emissions inspected
and ready to go. Sale
priced at $7595.
Trade-ins accepted.
Tag & title process-
ing available with
purchase. Call Fran
for an appointment
to see this out-
standing SUV.
570-466-2771
Scranton
MITSUBISHI `11
OUTLANDER SPORT SE
AWD, Black interi-
or/exterior, start/
stop engine with
keyless entry, heat-
ed seats, 18” alloy
wheels, many extra
features. Only Low
Miles. 10 year,
100,000 mile war-
ranty. $22,500. Will-
ing to negotiate.
Serious inquires
only - must sell,
going to law school.
(570) 793-6844
460
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
Line up a place to live
in classified!
472 Auto Services
$ WANTED JUNK $
VEHICLES
LISPI TOWING
We pick up 822-0995
472 Auto Services
WANTED
Cars & Full Size
Trucks. For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto
Parts 477-2562
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
CARPENTERS
NEEDED
Call 570-654-5775
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
515 Creative/Design
ARCHITECT/DETAILER
Scranton based
design Firm seeks
full-time architect/
detailer. Candidates
must have a Bache-
lors degree, 5+
years experience
with commercial
projects, CAD,
Revit, drawing
capabilities and
have proficient
computer skills.
Competitive salary
based on experi-
ence, healthcare,
401K and paid vaca-
tion. Resumes:
[email protected]
designltd.com
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
CLIENT SERVICES/
TELEPHONE
RECEPTIONIST
Our busy animal
hospital is looking
for a motivated,
dependable person
to work in our client
services and tele-
phone receptionist
departments. Cus-
tomer service and
experience answer-
ing multi-line tele-
phones is preferred.
Ability to work well
with the public and
attention to detail a
must! Hours will
include weekdays,
some Saturdays
and evenings.
Please reply to: c/o
The Times Leader
Box 3095
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
HOTEL
BEST WESTERN PLUS
EAST MOUNTAIN INN
HIRING THE FOLLOWING
PART TIME POSITIONS:
Housekeepers;
Banquet/Restaurant
Personnel; Front Desk
UNIFORMS AND MEALS
PROVIDED. WEEKENDS
AND HOLIDAYS A MUST.
APPLY IN PERSON.
NO PHONE CALLS.
OFF ROUTE 115
WILKES-BARRE
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
BODY SHOP
MANAGER
Our company is
seeking an individ-
ual that has exten-
sive experience in
all BODY SHOP
OPERATIONS.
Applicants must
have first hand
knowledge of DRP
repair require-
ments and esti-
mating systems.
They must show
leadership skills
with an emphasis
on production,
quality, and cus-
tomer satisfaction.
PA State Apprais-
ers Licenses
Required. A full
benefit package &
competitive salary
is offered.
COCCIA FORD
LINCOLN
COCCIA COLLISION
CENTER
577 East Main St
Wilkes-Barre, Pa
18701
Rudy Podest
570-823-8888
[email protected]
cocciacars.com
ALL APPLICANTS
ARE CONFIDENTIAL.
GasSearch Drilling
Services
Corporation is look-
ing for the following
position:
Experienced Mechanic
- Medical, Dental,
Vision Insurance
- 401K
- Quarterly Safety
Bonus
- Paid Holidays
- Paid Vacation
Apply within or
online: GasSearch
Drilling Services
Corporation
8283 Hwy 29
Montrose, PA 18801
570-278-7118
www.
gassearchdrilling.
com
LANDSCAPE
FOREPERSON
3 years experience
& Valid PA Driver’s
License a must.
570-779-4346
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
KALINOSKY
LANDSCAPING INC.
Is seeking experi-
enced persons for
Landscape & Main-
tenance positions.
Driver’s License
a must. Please call
570-696-4606
PLUMBERS AND
PIPEFITTERS
Penn State Mechan-
ical Contractors has
openings for ener-
getic, motivated,
experienced
plumbers and pip-
efitters. Experi-
enced foremen are
also encouraged to
apply. We offer
competitive wages
and a comprehen-
sive benefit pack-
age based on expe-
rience. We are an
Equal Opportunity
Employer.
Send resume with
work history to:
Penn State
Mechanical
Contractors, Inc.
PO Box 1027
Wilkes Barre, PA
18703
Fax: 570-823-0736
[email protected]
mechanical.com
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
542 Logistics/
Transportation
Drivers CDL-A:
Local Hazleton ded-
icated route! Home
every night! Great
Pay, Benefits!
Estenson Logistics
Apply:
www.goelc.com
1-866-336-9642
542 Logistics/
Transportation
CDL-A DRIVER
Gas field/landscape
drivers plus hands
on labor required.
Operate dump
trucks & load equip-
ment on lowboy.
Deliver to job site.
Must operate skid
steer excavator,
hydro-seed truck,
etc. Will plow in win-
ter. Must have clean
driving record and
pass drug test. Top
Wages Paid.
Call Harvis
Interview Service @
542-5330. Leave
message. Will send
an application.
Or forward resume:
[email protected]
gmail.com
Employer is
Varsity, Inc.
No walk-ins. EOE
DRIVER/
WAREHOUSE
Immediate opening
for an experienced
driver/warehouse.
Air brake CDL pre-
ferred, but not
required. Must
have experience
driving a 26 foot
straight truck.
Excellent starting
rate and full bene-
fits package.
Apply in person to:
INTERSTATE BUILDING
MATERIALS, INC.
Attn: Director of HR
322 Laurel St.
Pittston 18640
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
FORKLIFT
FORKLIFT OPERATORS
NEEDED FOR 2ND SHIFT
IN THE PITTSTON AREA.
EXPERIENCE REQUIRED.
APPLY IN PERSON
MONDAY THROUGH
THURSDAY
9 A.M. TO 2 P.M. AT:
Team Employer
Solutions
20 REYNOLDS ST.
KINGSTON, PA 18704
570-714-5955
545 Marketing/
Product
MARKETING/SALES
Full Time, Part Time
experienced Mar-
keting/Salesper-
sons. Identify and
connect with senior
executives, open
doors and arrange
meetings. Must
have excellent
phone skills.
Fax Resume to:
(866)969-0690
Email to:
[email protected]
verizon.net
548 Medical/Health
ACTIVITY ASSISTANT
Kingston Commons,
a Long Term Care
Nursing Facility, is
seeking an ener-
getic, outgoing indi-
vidual to direct
activities for Long
Term Care Resi-
dents. Must be a
certified nursing
assistant with previ-
ous experience in
long term care.
Position is Full-Time
with benefits.
APPLY IN PERSON TO:
KINGSTON COMMONS
615 WYOMING AVE.
KINGSTON, PA
18704
570-288-5496
DRUG FREE
WORKPLACE/E.O.E.
Medical Equipment
Technician
PRIOR EXPERIENCE
DELIVERING &
INSTRUCTING ON
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT
& SUPPLIES. FULL TIME
POSITION, REQUIRES
SOME ON CALL. MUST
BE DETAIL ORIENTED,
GOOD VERBAL & WRIT-
TEN SKILLS A MUST.
RESUMES TO
[email protected]
america.com.
To place your
ad call...829-7130
MEDICAL SECRETARY
A FULL TIME POSITION
FOR A MEDICAL SECRE-
TARY IS AVAILABLE AT
THE FREELAND HEALTH
CENTER IN FREELAND,
PA. PLEASE GO TO
WWW.RCHNEPA.COM
FOR INFORMATION ON
SALARY, BENEFITS,
AND APPLYING
FOR THE POSITION.
EOE M/F/V/H AA
Physical Physical
Therapists Therapists
GOLDEN CARE HOME
HEALTH, an elite
homecare provider
for 26 years is hir-
ing contracted PTs
for local visits in
Luzerne County.
Excellent per visit
rates. Call today at
570-654-2883
(EOE)
548 Medical/Health
RESIDENTIAL WORKER
Part time positions
available days,
evenings, over-
nights & weekends
serving female
youth in 24 hour/7
day a week residen-
tial treatment facili-
ty. Experience with
youth MH/MR popu-
lation is a plus. BS in
social work or relat-
ed field is preferred
Excellent compen-
sation, salary
Fax resume to:
570-829-6547 or
e-mail
[email protected]
EOE
RNS AND LPNS
needed for private
duty case in the
Dallas area for 3-11
and 11-7 shifts.
Call Jessica at
451-3050 for
immediate interview.
Therapeutic
Staff Support
Must be a reliable
self-starter.
Competitive wages.
Send resume to:
1264 Wyoming Ave.
Forty Fort, PA 18704
Attn: Jane Andrews
Or email
[email protected]
551 Other
LABORER
Seasonal help need-
ed until May 28th to
clean and plant
around cemetery
stones. Apply at:
Ketler Florist &
Greenhouses
1205 S. Main St.
Hanover Twp.
* * O P T I C A L O P T I C A L * *
• MACHINE
OPERATOR
3pm-8pm
• STOCK ROOM
Full time
Benefits for full
time. Send resume
or apply in person,
Monday-Friday,
8:30a - 6pm to:
LUZERNE OPTICAL
180 N. WILKES-
BARRE BLVD.
WILKES-BARRE, PA
18702
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
SALES OPPORTUNITY
DelBaso Ford is now
accepting applica-
tions for Sales Posi-
tions. We are look-
ing for an energetic,
self-motivated indi-
vidual to join our
award winning
organization.
Apply in person to:
249 Market Street
Kingston
Email: PatandDans
@aol.com or
Call 570-288-4501
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
MRG
EXCLUSIVE CASINO
RESORT RETAILER
IS LOOKING FOR
SALES
ASSOCIATES
WE OFFER A
GREAT BENEFITS
PACKAGE!!!!
QUALIFIED CANDI-
DATES CAN APPLY IN
PERSON AT OUR MAR-
SHALL ROUSSO STORE
IN MOHEGAN SUN
CASINO, ON-LINE AT
www.marshall
retailgroup.com
OR FAX YOUR RESUME
TO 609-317-1126
A PHENOMENAL
PLACE TOWORK!
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
Sales
Business to
Business
Successful, local
marketing com-
pany is looking
for experienced
B2B salesperson
to work Lack-
awanna and
Luzerne Coun-
ties. Company
provides guaran-
teed confirmed
appointments
each week to
compliment cold
calling efforts.
$24,000.00 base
salary to start
plus 5-20% com-
mission, fitness
membership,
health benefits,
cell phone, etc...
Please e-mail
resume to
prminc510
@aol.com
SALESPERSON
To work the jewel-
ry floor. Previous
experience is a
plus. Must have
great personality
and able to work
days, nights and
some weekends.
Part time or full
time. Full benefits
available.
Send resumes to:
The Times Leader
Box 3090
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
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548 Medical/Health
906 Homes for Sale
548 Medical/Health
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
554 Production/
Operations
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
554 Production/
Operations
BANK ORDERED
AUCTION
800-262-3050
www.auctionworldusa.com
Saturday, April 28th
SAVE $$$
69 Girard Avenue
Plymouth, PA 18651
Convenient 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath,
Single Family Home with Living
Room, Dining Room, Kitchen, Cov-
ered Front Porch, Rear Deck. Living
Area 1,800 SF+/-
11:00 AM
267 Gardner Street
Plymouth, PA 18651
Comfortable 2 Bedroom, Single
Family Home with Living Room,
Dining Area, Kitchen, Freshly Painted
Interior, Newer Carpet, Covered
Front Porch, Complete with Garage.
12:00 PM
68 GrahamAvenue
Hanover Twp., PA 18706
Surprising 4 Bedroom, Single Family
Home with Living Room, Dining
Room, Spacious Kitchen, Bay
Window, Covered Front Porch
and Exceptional Backyard.
1:30 PM
Auction World USA, Inc.
PA License # AY-59-L
CNA
7-3 & 3-11 Shifts
Part Time (5-9 days bi-weekly) with benefits
11 PM -7 AM CNA (Per Diem)
Apply online @
https://home.eease.com/recruit/?id=296360
**********************
Restorative CNA
6:30A.M.-2:30 P.M. Shift
Part Time (5-9 days bi-weekly) with benefits
Apply online @
https://home.eease.com/recruit/?id=1411181
Apply in person:
4 East Center Hill Road
Dallas PA 18612
Or
Email Resume – [email protected]
Individualized orientation program.
Competitive starting rates.
Vacation, Holiday and Personal Days.
Tuition Reimbursement.
Health Insurance and Pension Plan.
e.o.e.
Meadows Nursing &
Rehabilitation Center
Lawn Care
Technician
Looking for career change?
We provide initial & ongoing training.
Our technicians apply fertilizer, lime & weed
preventatives as well as insect control & turf
aeration services for residential & commercial
customers. Full time work. Monday-Friday.
8 AM – 5 PM. Must have good math skills, clean
driving record & pass physical & drug test.
Apply online at:
www.grasshopperlawns.com
Or stop in for application at:
470 E. State Street Larksville, PA 18651
Questions? Email Brian Phillips at:
[email protected]
Distribution Clerks
Wilkes-Barre
Are you a night owl looking for part-time work?
Position is TEMP-HIRE $9.75 Per Hour!
Thursday-Saturday 3pm-1:30am
REQUIREMENTS FOR CONSIDERATION:
PROFESSIONAL RESUME
with Solid Work History
Submit to a Background & Drug Screen
HS Diploma/GED
Stand on Feet All Day
Basic Computer Skills
Apply Today At
www.adeccousa.com
Or Call 570.451.3726
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
COFFEE SHOP
Turn key operation
in a wonderful area.
A must see! Deli &
ice cream. Will train,
excellent opportuni-
ty. $25,000.
570-262-1497
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
FIRE FIRE YOUR BOSS!!!! YOUR BOSS!!!!
“WORK FOR
YOURSELF”
INVEST IN
YOURSELF
WITH
JAN – PRO
*Guaranteed Clients
* Steady Income
*Insurance &
Bonding
* Training & Ongoing
Support
* Low Start Up
Costs
*Veterans Financing
Program
* Accounts available
through
0ut Wilkes-Barre
& Scranton
570-824-5774
Janpro.com
610 Business
Opportunities
NEPA FLORAL &
GIFT SHOP
Including delivery
van, coolers, all
inventory, displays,
computer system,
customer list, web-
site and much
more. Turn key
operation in prime
retail location. Seri-
ous inquiries please
call
570-592-3327
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
TURN KEY OPERATION
Located at
Wyoming Valley Mall
must sell. $125,000
negotiable. Ask for
Rob 570-693-3323
630 Money To Loan
“We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED.” Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say they’ve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
It’s a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
702 Air
Conditioners
AIR CONDITIONER
Ductless for large
room, 11,500 btu,
very good condition
$500. 388-6348
AIR CONDITIONERS
Frigidaire 5000 BTU,
manual $75. 11,000
BTU Frigidaire
portable, manual
$295. 570-636-3151
LG AIR CONDITIONER
& Heat Pump
18,000.4 SEER
R410 Refrigerant
Wall mounted, duct-
less. 220 volt. One
indoor, one outdoor
unit with remote
control. Call
570-288-0735
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
ANTIQUES: China
Cabinet $500. Desk
$200. Sewing
machine $100.
570-578-0728
COINS complete Set
Franklin half dollars,
excellent condition,
in book. $450.
570-823-6035
710 Appliances
DISHWASHER 24”
white, 2 years old
$150. obo.
RANGE HOOD 30”
Broan, white $50.
obo. 570-574-3899
DRYER, electric -
Maytag with power
cord 10 years. Good
Condition. $40.
570-592-0402
REFRIGERATOR
Frigidaire Gallery 26
cu. ft. with ice &
water, like new used
very little. $225.
570-457-7854
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
WASHER & DRYER,
full size, Maytag
$50. 570-696-3606
712 Baby Items
BABY CRIB com-
plete, excellent con-
dition, no recalls list-
ed. Dark Cherry
wood & drop down
side. Paid $250 for
crib and $40 for
mattress sell for
$90. 570-793-6040
CRIB MATTRESS
$20 used for one
child.570-825-0569
UMBRELLA Stroller
$7.
570-779-9791
714 Bridal Items
WEDDING GOWN
size 9-10 used
once, preserved in
box $30. 825-0569
726 Clothing
COAT
KENNETH COLE
Beige, size 6,
hardly worn. $75.
570-855-5385
JACKETS, leather,
black, 1 small- 1
large new $50.
each. Dolce Gab-
bana handbag $150.
570-654-4440
730 Computer
Equipment &
Software
COMPUTER, Dell
Windows XP 3GHZ
processor, 120 GB
hard drive, fast, bet-
ter than 7. $100.
570-824-7354
732 Exercise
Equipment
CROSS BOW legend
exercise machine,
very good condition,
sacrifice $200.
570-788-2388
744 Furniture &
Accessories
BED queen, tubular
steel head & foot
board, $175. Black
wicker chair $25.
SHELVING, metal, 4
shelves, $5.
570-654-4440
BEDROOM SET
white girl’s double
dresser with mirror,
desk with hutch &
chair, 2 end tables,
moving 0 must sell
$75. 570-718-0187
COFFEE TABLE,
solid oak, great con-
dition, measures
53" Lx24" x 17" h
$75. 570-690-6087
COUCH & Loveseat
camelback, bur-
gundy, like new
$200. Chair like new
$35. green.
570-822-5460
COUCH, loveseat,
chair, glass & brass
coffee table, 2
matching end
tables, 2 table top
lamps with coordi-
nating floor lamp,
like new $450. Din-
ing room table, 4
matching chairs, 2
leafs $200. X-large
dark green recliner
chair $25. Walnut
kitchen set, 4 chairs
$2o. 570-696-3606
DINING ROOM SET
Solid Oak. Table
with 2 leaves, 6
chairs, buffet, pro-
tective table pads
included. $800
570-299-5046
DINING ROOM SET,
walnut, table, 6
chairs (2 captain), 2
leafs, huge match-
ing glass front door
hutch $350. Dark
wood bedroom
suite, double bed,
head & footboard,
chest of drawers,
mirrored dresser, 2
night stands $200.
.570-693-3462
ETAGERE. Curved
wrought iron unit
with glass shelves.
$60. 570-288-5251
744 Furniture &
Accessories
DRESSER Lexington
mirrored cherry
dresser top with
drawers, excellent
condition $285.
570-542-5622
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
FURNITURE. Huntley
2 pieces corner
lighted china cabi-
net & buffet, blond
mahogany accent-
ed with shabby chic
painted accent
design, versatile
pieces. Motivated
seller. $200 OBO
570-466-6481
HUTCH 1970s solid
walnut hutch. 6’h
x4’w, glass doors,
excellent condition.
$300. Solid walnut
bookcase, 5’hx3’w
$75. 570-881-5809.
KITCHEN TABLE 6
chairs& hutch $400
Sleeper sofa $300
Tiffany style double
light lamp $75
10,000 btu air condi-
tioner $75. All excel-
lent condition.
570-825-2888
Mattress
Queen P-Top Set
New in Plastic
Can Deliver
$150
570-280-9628
ROCKING CHAIR
Boston $100.
570-847-336
TABLE 45” drop leaf
oak table $25. Cane
oak chairs $5. each.
22” round oak lamp
table $5. Oak plant
table $8. 9 table
lamps $5 each.
570-639-1653
WEST WEST WYOMING WYOMING
6th Street
OPEN YEAR ROUND
SPACE
AVAILABLE
INSIDE & OUT
ACRES OF
PARKING
OUTSIDE
SPACES
- $10
Saturday
10am-2pm
Sunday
8am-4pm
FLEA
MARKET
752 Landscaping &
Gardening
LANDSCAPING
CURBING MACHINE
Whiteman multi
quipped brand
includes trailer.
Going out of busi-
ness. $6000 neg.
570-357-2753
756 Medical
Equipment
Jazzy Powerchair
1113, needs battery
$550. Wheelchair
$85. Walker with
wheels $35.
570-829-2411
WALKER for
handicap $6.
570-779-9791
758 Miscellaneous
AIR PURIFIER Oreck
XL, manual was
$299. asking $149.
2 oscillating fans
both $25. 636-3151
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
AUTO PAINT BASE
COAT, 1 gallon GM
rally red Corvette
color sell for $100.
obo. 570-883-7007`
BOAT 12’ aluminum
with oars, 5 HP gas
outboard engine
$600. Angle iron
rack for pickup
extends over cab
$70. 570-655-0546
CANOE 16’ with
trailer & lots of
extras. $595.
570-542-5622
CHRISTMAS TREE
7 1/2’’ Martha Stew-
art used 3 times
asking $50.
570-825-0569
COFFEE MAKER
Bunn automatic,
two burner, stain-
less $75. 847-3368
MALIBU LIGHT
Expressions, tier
lights with auto
timer, 12 fixtures.
New $74. sell $50.
Aluminum fine
screen 48”w, 15’ roll
$10. 570-779-9791
RECORDS LPs,
78s, 45s, $1. each.
570-829-2411
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
,
A
P
R
I
L
2
5
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
7
9
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
HDI METALS
39 S. Prospect St.
Nanticoke PA • 570-735-1487
GOLD - SILVER
COINS - JEWELRY
Buying Daily 11AM - 6PM
No nonsense guarantee
We will beat any competitors
advertised price by up to 20%
758 Miscellaneous
DINNERWARE 64
piece $35. Black
carpet 60”x*0” $20.
White lace 50 yards
8” straight piece
with 3” gather riffle
$35. Wedding
bows, white lace 24
for $12. Farberware
coffee urn 12 to 55
cups, need stem
$25. Sewing
machine $20. Elas-
tic 5 factory rolls
1/4” $25. 654-4440
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
OFFICE DESK with
pull out drawers in
great shape $25;
new bathroom sink,
white $10; bathroom
sink, tan $10; School
classroom desk
$20. 570-262-7923.
PROSUN TANNING BED
Asking $2,700. or
best offer. Great
condition! Contact
Jodi 570-574-4376.
REVEREWARE,
clean, shiny & very
good condition, 8
pieces $3-$6 each.
Corelle Spring Blos-
som Crazy daisy 60
pieces @.30 each.
Flatware 26 piece
Everbrite stainless
deluxe in case $8.
Vintage style 12
piece pumpkin tea
set $10. Ceramic
Christmas tree with
lights $5. 639-1653
SAFE/Yale $50.
Heater Tower, elec-
tric, portable, $20.
570-825-5847
770 Photo
Equipment
CAMERA. Nikon
35mm zoom touch
470 AF. $75
570-847-3368
MANFROTTO
MONO-POD model
681B excellent con-
dition $50.
570-788-2388
772 Pools & Spas
HEATER: Laars Lite
2 - gas above
ground pool heater,
4 years old, pur-
chased new asking
$200. 498-2716
776 Sporting Goods
DRIVER. Callaway
Ftiz 13 degree
Senior shaft. Very
good condition. $75
570-287-5745
PULL-CART for golf
bag good condition,
$15. 570-788-2388
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
780 Televisions/
Accessories
TV 13” color, manu-
al, remote, wall-
mount bracket $75.
570-636-3151
784 Tools
LAWN MOWER 19”
rechargeable rotary
mower with charg-
er, model no 247.
370480. Like new
gently used 2 years
on small townhouse
plot. New $400;
asking $150.
570-825-2961
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
ALL
JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
800
PETS & ANIMALS
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
“The World of Pets
Unleashed”
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
LABRADOR RETRIEVER
Pups. 5 Black
males, 1 yellow
female, ACA regis-
tered, shots and
wormed. $350.
Ready April 23.
570-556-0357
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
LHASA-POO &
SHIH-TZU PUPPIES
Shots current.
$400
570-250-9690
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
EXETER
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
362 Susquehanna
Ave
Completely remod-
eled, spectacular,
2 story Victorian
home, with 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
new rear deck, full
front porch, tiled
baths and kitchen,
granite counter-
tops, all Cherry
hardwood floors
throughout, all new
stainless steel
appliances and
lighting, new oil fur-
nace, washer dryer
in first floor bath.
Great neighbor-
hood, nice yard.
$174,900 (30 year
loan, $8,750 down,
$887/month, 30
years @ 4.5%)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
SHAVERTOWN
105 Summit Street
Fire damaged
home. Sold as is.
60’ x 235’ lot. Pub-
lic sewer,
water & gas.
$34,500 negotiable
Call 570-675-0446,
evenings.
WEST PITTSTON
225-227 Boston Ave
Double block.
Wyoming Area
schools. Out of flood
zone. 1 side rented
to long term tenant
at $525 /month.
Other side remod-
eled - move in or
rent at $650/month.
3 bedrooms each
side, gas furnaces,
sunrooms, large
yard. $149,000. Call
570-357-0042
906 Homes for Sale
LEHIGH VALLEY
Charming remod-
eled 2 story is in
excellent move in
condition. 4 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
carpeted floors,
patio/balcony,
basement, central
heating, deck/
porch, Pool, view
& 2 car garage.
It has new roof,
windows & siding.
Located in quiet
development
close to every-
thing, walking
distance from
grocery store.
School District is
one of the best in
the area. Taxes
are cheap yet
across from a
wildlife preserve,
so you will feel like
your on vacation
when sitting on
your porch. For
sale by owner.
Act fast this
charming home
isn’t going to be
available long!
$219,000
Call 696-2009
for details or view
http://1580spring
creekcircle.
blogspot.com
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
SWOYERSVILLE
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
52 Barber Street
Beautifully remod-
eled 3 bedroom, 1
bath home in the
heart of the town.
With new carpets,
paint, windows,
doors and a mod-
ern kitchen and
bath. Sale includes
all appliances:
refrigerator, stove,
dishwasher, washer
and dryer. Nice yard
and superb neigh-
borhood. Priced to
sell at $89,900 or
$433.00 per month
(bank rate; 30
years, 4.25%, 20%
down). Owner also
willing to finance
100% of transaction
with a qualified
cosigner. Call Bob at
570-654-1490
906 Homes for Sale
WEST WYOMING
438 Tripp St
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
Completely remod-
eled home with
everything new.
New kitchen, baths,
bedrooms, tile
floors, hardwoods,
granite countertops,
all new stainless
steel appliances,
refrigerator, stove,
microwave, dish-
washer, free stand-
ing shower, tub for
two, huge deck,
large yard, excellent
neighborhood
$154,900 (30 year
loan @ 4.5% with 5%
down; $7,750 down,
$785/month)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
WYOMING
DOUBLE BLOCK
Easily converts to
single home. New
roof, electric,
windows & 2 car
garage. Remod-
eled. 66 x 100 feet,
fenced lot,
$120,000.
570-693-2408
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
912 Lots & Acreage
SUSQUEHANNA
COUNTY/MONTROSE
10.66 ACRES
Mostly wooded.
$100,000.
Well & electric, no
running water.
Small bunk bed
cabin with base-
board heat.
No septic.
610-760-1308
UPSTATE NY
FARM LIQUIDATION!
5 Acres $19,900
10 Acres $29,900
23 Acres - Mini
Farm - $189,900
Gorgeous views,
woods, streams!
2 1/2 hours NY City!
Call (888) 793-7762
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
DUPONT
Completely remod-
eled, modern 2 bed-
room townhouse
style apartment.
Lots of closet
space, with new
carpets and com-
pletely repainted.
Includes stove,
refrigerator, wash-
er, dryer hook up.
Nice yard & neigh-
borhood, no pets.
$595 + security. Call
570-479-6722
EDWARDSVILLE
Small 2 bedroom,
water included
$500/mo.+ security.
PITTSON
Small 1 bedroom, all
included, no electric
$500/mo. + securi-
ty. 570-406-1061
EXETER
First floor,
1 bedroom.
Freshly painted,
washer/dryer
hook-up. $395/
month + utilities.
Security required.
NO PETS.
570-477-6018
leave message.
FORTY FORT
1 BEDROOM APTS
Very nice, clean,
great neighbor-
hood, hardwood
floors, a/c, washer
/dryer with newer
appliances, stor-
age, 1st/last/securi-
ty with one year
lease. References
required. $650-
$695 + utilities.
Water/sewer by
owner, no pets,
non-smoking.
Call 202-997-9185
for appointment
FORTY FORT
2nd floor, 4 rooms,
wall to wall carpet,
heat, public water,
sewer & recycling
fees included. Tile
bathroom with
shower. Attic &
yard. Stove & fridge
furnished. Washer /
dryer hookup. Good
location, off street
parking, No pets. 1
year lease & securi-
ty, $650. Call
570-655-0530
HARDING
Renovated 1st floor,
2 bedroom apart-
ment. New carpet-
ing and paint. Fridge
& stove. Water
Included. $600 +
security & utilities.
Call 570-240-6620
or 570-388-6503
NANTICOKE
Honeypot Section
2nd floor, 3 room
apartment. Nice
neighborhood. $400
+ utilities & security.
No pets. Call
570-885-6878
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
FORTY FORT
30 DAY
MAKEOVER
America Realty
Rentals
First Floor,
Renovated,
Compact,
1 Bedrooms,
Gas Fireplaces,
new wall to wall,
Appliances,
Decks.
EMPLOYMENT
VERIFICATION/
APPLICATION,
2 YEAR SAME
RENTS START-
ING AT $500 +
Utilities.
NO PETS OR
SMOKING
288-1422
KINGSTON
EATON TERRACE
317 N. Maple
Ave. Large Two
story, 2 bed-
room, 1.5 bath,
Central Heat &
Air, washer/dryer
in unit, parking.
$840 + utilities &
1 month security
570-262-6947
LUZERNE
378 Miller St.
Recently remod-
eled, 1st floor. 1
bedroom, living
room, large modern
kitchen with stove.
New bath, clean
basement, laundry
hookups. Enclosed
porch, parking. No
pets/smoking.
$475/mo. includes
heat and water.
570-288-9843
NANTICOKE
1st floor. 1 bed-
room. ALL UTILI-
TIES INCLUDED!
Off street parking.
Fresh paint.
NO PETS
$525 + security
570-477-6018
leave message
NANTICOKE
Great 1st floor 1
bedroom apart-
ment, heat included,
with a detached
garage in a great
location. Hardwood
floors & appliances
included. Shared
washer / dryer.
Large yard. $750 +
electric, security &
references. Call
570-371-3271
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
PITTSTON
2 or 3 bedroom, 1st
floor, full kitchen.
Heat included, no
pets. $650 + 1
month security. Call
570-451-1038
P
A
G
E
8
0
W
E
E
K
E
N
D
E
R
,
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
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,
A
P
R
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2
5
,
2
0
1
2
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
NANTICOKE
Spacious 1 bed-
room 1st floor. New
carpeting, gas
range and fridge
included. Garage
parking, no dogs.
References and
security required.
$450/mo. Water,
sewer, garbage fee
incl. Tenant pays
gas and electric
570-696-3596
30+
DAY
BEING
REMODELED
NORTH
WILKES-BARRE
FIRST FLOOR
EFFICIENCY /
1 BEDROOM,
BRAND NEW
FLOORING,
CARPETING,
MODERN/APPLI-
ANCES, ELEC-
TRIC/GAS FIRE-
PLACE. APPLI-
CATION/EMPLO
YMENT VERIFI-
CATION “being
considered” NO
PETS/SMOKING
2 YEARS @
$500+ UTILITIES.
MANAGED!
Amer|ca Rea|ty
Renta|s
288-1422
PITTSTON
1st floor, 2 bed-
rooms. All appli-
ances included. All
utilities paid; elec-
tricity by tenant.
Everything brand
new. Off street park-
ing. $750 + security
& references. Call
570-969-9268
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
PITTSTON
2nd floor, 2 bed-
rooms, living room,
eat in kitchen. Stove
fridge, washer &
dryer included. Car-
peted & newly
painted. Off street
parking for 1 car. No
smoking. No pets.
$575 + utilities,
security & 1st month
570-696-1485
Leave Message
PLAINS
Newly remodeled, 2
bedroom. Living
room, dining room,
eat in kitchen, stove
w/d hookup. Heat,
water, sewer
included. No smok-
ing or pets.
$625/month, secu-
rity and references.
570-905-0186
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WEST WYOMING
425 West 8th Street
New 1st floor, 2
bedroom with off
street parking,
washer/dryer hook
up, stove. No pets.
$550/mo + security.
Sewer & garbage
included, other utili-
ties by tenant.
570-760-0458
WEST WYOMING
932 Shoemaker
Ave. 1 bedroom, 1st
floor, carpet, pri-
vate drive. Gas
heat, fridge, stove,
w/d hookup. $425
plus utilities.
No pets.
570-693-4226
WEST WYOMING
First floor, 1 bed-
room, $450 per
month + utilities.
No pets, no
smoking. Call
570-693-1000
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
WILKES-BARRE
1 bedroom. Heat &
hot water included.
$550 month +
security required
973-879-4730
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
155 W. River St.
1 bedroom, some
appliances included,
all utilities included
except electric,
hardwood floors,
Pet friendly. $600.
570-969-9268
944 Commercial
Properties
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Rte. 315
1,000 &
3,800 Sq. Ft.
WILL DIVIDE
OFFICE / RETAIL
Call 570-829-1206
RETAIL
SHOPPES
30-60 day
availability
FORTY FORT
WYOMING AVE
"Amer|ca Rea|ty"
Renta|s
Lease one or
more "d|v|ded|
sma|| shoppes".
Starting @ $550 -
2 years, 500/600
approximate sq.
ft. Inquiries apply:
570-288-1422
Line up a place to live
in classified!
315 PLAZA
1,750 SQ. FT. &
3,400 SQ.FT
OFFICE/RETAIL
570-829-1206
WEST PITTSTON
OFFICE SPACE
Containing Six sepa-
rate offices, 1 large
meeting room. Seg-
regated bathrooms.
Kitchenette. Total
recent renovation.
Great location. Lot
parking in rear.
$3,500 monthly. Call
570-299-5471
950 Half Doubles
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
1 Regina St
3 bedrooms, 1.5
bath. All appliances
included. New car-
pet. Large kitchen &
living room. $875 +
utilities. Security
deposit + back-
ground check. Call
570-765-4474
HARVEYS LAKE
3 bedroom, 1 bath,
eat-in kitchen,
washer/dryer hook-
up, off street park-
ing. $700 + utilities.
570-606-7917
leave message
950 Half Doubles
KINGSTON
Penn St.
1/2 Double, 2 bed-
room. Newly
remodeled. Gas
Heat. Washer &
dryer hookup, yard,
parking. Section 8
Not Approved. No
pets. $550 + utili-
ties. 570-714-1530
NANTICOKE
HALF DOUBLE
3 bedrooms, Gas
heat. Sewer &
garbage included
$575 month, + utili-
ties, Call
570-740-7016
PITTSTON TWP
MAINTENANCE FREE!
2 Large Bedrooms.
Off-Street Parking
No Smoking.
$600+utilities, secu-
rity, last month.
570-885-4206
WEST PITTSTON
3 bedrooms, eat in
kitchen, hardwood
floors, natural
woodwork, garage.
Walking distance to
churches and
schools. Non smok-
ing, no pets.
Call 570-655-2195
WILKES-BARRE
Parsons Section
3 bedroom. Off
street parking. Pets
welcome. $550/mo.
Credit / Criminal
check required. Call
570-266-5336
953Houses for Rent
DALLAS
FOR SALE
OR RENT
Single home in
gated retirement
village. 3 bedroom,
2 bath, 2 car
garage. Granite
countertops, hard-
wood floors, gas
fireplace, appli-
ances included.
Quiet 55 plus com-
munity. No Pets.
One year lease.
$1675/mo + utilities
& security. Monthly
maintenance fee
included.
570-592-3023
HARVEYS LAKE
2 small bedrooms,
All appliances. New
wall to wall. Secu-
rity & first
month’s rent.
NO PETS.
570-762-6792
WILKES-BARRE
ELEGANT
VICTORIAN
5 bedroom. 1.5
baths.
www.aptilike.com
Ad #547
953Houses for Rent
SWOYERSVILLE
Completely remod-
eled Large 2 story, 3
bedrooms, 2 baths,
single family home
including refrigera-
tor, stove, dish-
washer & disposal.
Gas heat, nice yard,
good neighbor-
hood,. Off street
parking. Shed. No
pets. $995 / month.
570-479-6722
959 Mobile Homes
HARVEYS LAKE
Available May 1
2 bedroom mobile
home. Newly
remodeled. All new
carpet, flooring &
appliances, includ-
ing washer & dryer.
$575 + utilities &
security deposit.
Call 484-571-8356
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
HARVEYS LAKE
Furnished Summer
Home. Weekly and/
or Monthly. Starting
June to end of
August. Washer &
dryer. Free boat
slips. Call for more
details.
570-639-5041
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1039 Chimney
Service
A-1 ABLE
CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair
Chimneys. All
types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed &
Insured
570-735-2257
1042 Cleaning &
Maintainence
HOUSE CLEANING
We would love to
clean your home.
We clean around
your schedule.
We clean weekly,
bi-weekly, and
monthly. We also
do one time clean-
ing. Call Eddie
570-677-0344 or
online at www.
empresacleaning.
com
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
Wi l l i ams & Franks I nc
Masonry - Concrete
Brick-Stonework.
Chimneys-Stucco”
“NO JOB TOO
SMALL”
“Damage repair
specialist”
570-466-2916
1057Construction &
Building
GARAGE
DOOR
Sales, service,
installation &
repair.
FULLY
INSURED
HIC# 065008
CALL JOE
570-735-8551
Cell 606-7489
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars,
Garages, we’re
cheaper than
dumpsters!.
Free Estimates,
Same Day!
570-822-4582
ALWAYS READY
HAULING
Moving, Deliver-
ies, Property &
Estate Cleanups,
Attics, Cellars,
Yards, Garages,
Construction
Sites, Flood
Damage & More.
CHEAPER THAN
A DUMPSTER!!
SAME DAY
SERVICE
Free Estimates
570-301-3754
1162 Landscaping/
Garden
CO$T CO$T U LE$$ U LE$$
LANDSCAPING
Specializing in
Grass Cutting,
Trimming of Shrubs
& Hedges,
& Mulching
Call for estimates
570-239-4011
GARDEN TILLING
call Stan at
570-574-3050
1165 Lawn Care
GRASS CUTTING
Affordable, reliable,
meticulous. Rates
as low as $20.
Emerald Green
570-825-4963
YARD CLEAN UP
Attics & Basements
Complete clean ups
Garden tilling
Call for quotes
570-954-7699 or
570-926-9029
1183 Masonry
H O S CONSTRUCTION
Licensed - Insured
Certified - Masonry
Concrete - Roofing
Quality Craftsman-
ship
Guaranteed.
Unbeatable Prices
Senior Citizen Dis-
counts
Free Estimates
570-574-4618 or
570-709-3577
• Local news
• National news
• Sports
• Weather
andmuchmore.
Plus, report
your own
news tips,
photos and
video
directly
to our
newsroom!
FREE!
GET THE
TIMES
LEADER
APP.
ALL FORFREE.
ALL FROM
YOURMOBILE
DEVLICE
FINDIT
ATYOUR
APPSTORE
TODAY.
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242 N. M em orial H wy., Sh avertown,PA
675-1245
H E AL T H &
RE L AX AT IO N S PA
M E E T O UR S T AF F !
K AT IE • M O N A • S E L E N A
GO DL IE • C O O K IE • AM BE R
$10 O F F AN Y S E RV IC E
W IT H C O UPO N
E x pire s 5/ 2/ 12
2
0
6
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9
SENSATIO NS
New A m ericanStaff
A cceptingallm ajor credit cards
5 70 -779 -4 5 5 5
14 75 W.MainSt.,Plym outh
COM E IN & M E E T
ANNA, CH R ISTIANA
D AILY SP E CIAL
1 H OUR $40
TUE SD AY
2 F OR 1
TH UR SD AY 4-9P M
H AL F OF F AL L
SE SSIONS
SATUR D AY
30 M INUTE S
$2 0
NOW H IR ING —
1 P OSITION
P AR K ING IN TH E R E AR
2
5
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The Aroma A Spa
405 N. River Street • Wilkes-Barre
ORIENTAL SHIATSU
BODY MASSAGE
570-991-8566
10 AM
to 10 PM
DAILY
2
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Magical Asian
Massage
570-540-5333
177 South Market Street, Nanticoke
OPEN:
9:30 A.M.-12:30 A.M.
Featuring Table Shampoo
Seductive
Seductive
Pleasures
Pleasures
570-991-8444 570-991-8444
SPECIALS! SPECIALS! SPECIALS!
OPEN 24/7 NOW HIRING! OPEN 24/7 NOW HIRING! OPEN 24/7 NOW HIRING!
South Rt. 309
Hazleton
(entrance on
2nd floor)
FREE
PARKING PPAARRK KINNNGG
570-861-9027
Spa 21
S w e d is h & R e la xa tion M a s s a ge
750 Ju m p e r R oa d , W ilk e s - B a rre
M in u te s from
the M ohe ga n S u n Ca s in o
$10 off 60 m in . m a s s a ge
H EAVEN LY TOU CH
M AS S AGE
Tra c to rTra ilerPa rk ingAva ila b le
Sho w erAva ila b le
8 29- 30 10
Im m e d ia te H irin g
N ew Cu s to m ers Only
M&R Agency
Rt. 11, West Nanticoke
735-4150
SPECIAL
$30 OFF
HALF HOUR SESSION. W/COUPON
EXP 5-9-12
MOST MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED
HOWHIRING
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NEW HOURS: Mon-Sat 10-12
12-6 pm Sunday
Aura
Massage
460 S. Empire St.
Wilkes-Barre •970.4700
HALF HOUR
$20
HOUR
$40
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ELITE SPA
N E W S TA F F !
Orien ta l S ta ff
Body S ha m poo
M a ssa ge-Ta n n in g
318 W ilkes-Ba rre Tow n ship Blv d., R ou te 309
L a rge P a rkin g A rea • Open D a ily 9a m -M idn ight
570.852.3429
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539 R e a r Scott Str e e t, W ilk e s-B a r r e
570.82 9.3914 • H our s: 10 a m – 1 a m • Op e n 7 D a ys A W e e k
Or ie n ta l Sta ff
M a ssa g e
B od y Sh a m p oo
Ta n n in g
Sa un a
539 SPA
7
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Exotica Massage & Day Spa
MISTY MYSTIQUE MISTY MYSTIQUE
Call for appt. 830am-8 pm Mon.-Thurs. Call for appt. 830am-8 pm Mon.-Thurs.
Weekends 9 am-10 PM Weekends 9 am-10 PM
EXOTIC JAZMINE EXOTIC JAZMINE
8am-8pm Mon-Thurs., Sat. by Appt. 8am-8pm Mon-Thurs., Sat. by Appt.
570-496-3127 570-496-3127
NOW HIRING! DAY SPA OPENING IN JUNE! NOW HIRING! DAY SPA OPENING IN JUNE!
CALL FOR DETAILS! CALL FOR DETAILS!
Secret Moments
RELAXING BODY RUBS
PRIVATE AND DISCRETE
CALL BY APPOINTMENT
10AM-8PM • 570.344.5395
19 Asian
Spa
Open 7 Days 10am-11:30pm
FEATURING BODY AND
FOOT MASSAGES
$10 OFF HOUR
SESSIONS
570-337-3966
Unit 19A Gateway Shopping
Center, Edwardsville
SUPERHOT
TRANSEXUAL IN TOWN!
5 STAR EXPERIENCE THAT
WILL LEAVE YOU SATISFIED!
GREAT FOR THE STRAIGHT
MAN, PERFECT FOR YOU!
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED!
GOOD WITH FIRST TIMERS!
36DD, 22, 34
TS VERONICA
323-863-3495
theweekender.com
weekender
TO PLACE
AN AD
CALL
JOHN
831.7349
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Get your head
inside the motor
Motorhead
To Enter email pictures to: [email protected]
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MAKE A NIGHT OF IT!
Complementary admission into Club Evolution with dine in dinner.
STREAM SIDE DINNING.
Half price sushi Sunday all day & Mon-Sat 11am-3:30pm.
TAKE OUT AVAILABLE
Inside the Woodlands • 1073 Highway 315 Wilkes-Barre 570.270.9168
Mon-Thurs 11am-10pm • Fri & Sat 11am-11pm • Sun 11:30am -10pm
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TAKE THE WEEKENDER
WHEREVER YOU GO.
CHECK OUT OUR
MOBILE SITE TODAY.
THEWEEKENDER.COM
weekender
weekender
LISTEN TO THE
WEEKENDER CHECKLIST
WITH EDITOR
NIKKI M. MASCALI
ON 105 THE RIVER
WITH
BRYAN THOMPSON
EVERY FRIDAY
DURING THE
5 P.M. HOUR!
BRYAN
THOMPSON
NIKKI M.
MASCALI
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Rt. 11 S. Plymouth Twp.
570.779.4145
Rt. 11 S. Plymouth Twp
570.779.4145
HAPPY HOUR DAILY 4:30-6:30 $2.50 DOMESTIC BOTTLES
OPEN DAILY:
MONDAY - SUNDAY 1PM-2AM
THANK YOU FOR VOTING THE GETAWAY LOUNGE RUNNER UP FOR BEST STRIP CLUB
SATURDAY, APRIL 28TH
GONE
CRAZY
9:30-1:30 • NO COVER
THURSDAY
OPEN CALL FOR DANCERS
FROM 8-12
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MAN OF
THE WEEK
Age: 19
Status: Single
Occupation: Student, lifeguard, coach
Favorite Weekender feature: MP3 of the Week
Favorite body part: Back
Favorite body part on the opposite sex: Breasts
Favorite sport: Football
Favorite restaurant: Perkins
Most embarrassing moment?
Giving my shirt away to some random kid at a track
meet. I almost got our team disqualifed for the year
Last iPod download?
“Wishing Well” by Blink-182
If you could have a one-night stand with anyone,
no strings attached, who would it be?
Katy Perry
Guilty pleasure?
Sleeping really late
What wouldn’t you do for a million dollars?
Doing pull ups off a bumper on the side of a cliff
Secret to keeping yourself in shape?
Just staying motivated every day. And to prove some
people wrong
Were you ever grounded growing up? If so
for what? Yes, me and my friends were throwing
snowballs at cars, and we hit this one guy who had
his window open. It clocked him right in the face
One thing most people don’t know about you?
I’m really shy
MATT MALAK
weekender
TO ENTER, SEND TWO RECENT PHOTOS TO [email protected]
Include your age, full name, hometown and phone number. (must be 18+)
FOR MORE PHOTOS OF MATT, VISIT US AT THEWEEKENDER.COM
PHOTOS BY NICOLE ORLANDO • SHOT ON LOCATION AT THE SAPPHIRE SALON
PITTSTON 570.602.7700
MONTAGE 570.414.7700
The Sapphire Salon
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MODEL OF
THE WEEK
Age: 18
Hometown: Taylor
Status: In a relationship
Occupation: Student
Favorite Weekender feature: Model/Man of the Week
Favorite body part: My long torso or legs
Favorite body part on the opposite sex:
Muscular arms
Favorite sport: Gymnastics
Most embarrassing moment? I walked into a
swinging door at work with a tray full of beer bottles.
They ended up smashing all over the foor
Last movie you watched: “Friends with Benefts”
If you could have a one-night stand with anyone,
no strings attached, who would it be? Joseph
Gordon-Levitt or male model Francisco Lachowski
Guilty pleasure? Bread, I am obsessed
One thing most people don’t know about you?
I live most of my life in a fantasy world. I love to
daydream
What would your autobiography be titled?
“Life as an Ambitious Fashion Student”
If you had nothing to do all day, how would you
spend your time?
Go on a road trip without a set destination
TO ENTER, SEND TWO
RECENT PHOTOS TO
[email protected]
Include your age, full name, hometown and
phone number. (must be 18+)
weekender
STEPHANIE KEARNEY
HAIR AND MAKEUP PROVIDED BY SAPPHIRE
SALON AND DAY SPA
Hair by Christine Appnel
Makeup by Genny Tabone
FOR MORE PHOTOS OF STEPHANIE,
VISIT US AT THEWEEKENDER.COM
PHOTOS BY NICOLE ORLANDO
SHOT ON LOCATION AT SAPPHIRE SALON AND DAY SPA
WARDROBE PROVIDED BY
SAPPHIRE SALON AND DAY SPA
PITTSTON 570.602.7700
MONTAGE 570.414.7700
The Sapphire Salon
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Our shelves are restocked! We have the cars and we have the deals! Highest Prices Paid for Trades!
NO CREDIT APPLICATION WILL BE REFUSED.
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560 Pierce Street
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570-714-9924
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L.T. VERRASTRO * IMPORTING BEER DISTRIBUTOR * 1-800-341-1200 * WWW.LTVERRASTRO.COM
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A CLAUSE ............................................................ CARBONDALE
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BEER CITY USA ......................... SOUTH SIDE SHOPPING CENTER
BORO BEVERAGE ...................................................... MOSCOW
BREWER’S OUTLET .................................................. DUNMORE
CADDEN BROTHERS .................... LUZERNE STREET - SCRANTON
CROWN BEVERAGE ...................................... CLARK SUMMIT
FLANNERY CASE BEVERAGE ............................ MOOSIC STREET
JOE’S BEERMAN ....................................... MAIN ST. - PECKVILLE
MANCUSO BEVERAGE .......................................... CARBONDALE
NORTH POCONO BEVERAGE ............... BILL’S PLAZA - DALEVILLE
OLD FORGE BEVERAGE ..................... S. MAIN ST. - OLD FORGE
OLYPHANT BOTTLING ....................................... BURKE BYPASS
PIONEER DISTRIBUTING ............................ GREEN RIDGE STREET
SUMMIT BEVERAGE .......................................... CLARK SUMMIT
POCONO AREA
BREWSKIES BEVERAGE ................................... E. STROUDSBURG
MOUNT POCONO BEVERAGE .......................... MOUNT POCONO
SUSQUEHANNA AREA
MONTROSE BEVERAGE..............................................MONTROSE
SUSQUEHANNA BEVERAGE ......................................HALLSTEAD
TUNKHANNOCK AREA
B&R DISTRIBUTING ...........................................TUNKHANNOCK
PLAZA BEVERAGE..............................................TUNKHANNOCK
WYOMING COUNTY BEVERAGE ..........................TUNKHANNOCK
LUZERNE COUNTY
B&G DISTRIBUTING.....................................................PITTSTON
BEER SUPER.......................................................WILKES-BARRE
J&M UNION BEVERAGE.................................................LUZERNE
LAKEWAY BEVERAGE.......................................................DALLAS
MOUNTAIN BEVERAGE ...........................S.RIVER STREET - PLAINS
NANTICOKE BEER DISTRIBUTOR .................................NANTICOKE
PLAZA BEVERAGE ........................................PITTSTON BYPASS
QUALITY BEVERAGE NEPA .............................................LAFLIN
WYCHOCK’S BEVERAGE ...............................................MT. TOP
WYCHOCK’S BEVERAGE ......................................WILKES-BARRE
WYOMING VALLEY BEVERAGE ...........................EDWARDSVILLE

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