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1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Some believe that leaders are born, not made, while others think that leadership is a quantifiable set of skills and ways of thinking that can be taught (Kanter, R.M.1994). Leadership is a process by which a person influences others to accomplish an objective and directs the organization in a way that makes it more cohesive and coherent. Knowledge and skills contribute directly to the process of leadership, while the other attributes give the leader certain characteristics that make him or her unique (Brown, 2003). Explaining and understanding the nature of good leadership is probably easier than practicing it. Good leadership requires deep human qualities, beyond conventional notions of authority. Good leaders typically have a keen understanding of relationships within quite large and complex systems and networks(Ross, 2009). According to Gavino (1997), successful leadership requires behavior that unites and stimulates followers towards defined objectives in specific situations. Without leadership, an organization would be a confusion of people and machines.The traditional concept of a leader being the directing chief at the top of a hierarchy is nowadays a very incomplete appreciation of what true leadership must be. According to Brasco (2010), leadership can be performed with different styles. Some leaders have one style, which is right for certain situation and wrong for others. Some leaders can adapt and use different leadership styles for given situations.A collaborative leadership style suggests that leader should involve the staff in setting the direction of the organization. Rubin(2002) defines collaboration as a purposeful relationship in which all parties strategically choose to cooperate in order to accomplish a shared outcome.As a political science student, the researcher is interested to know the leadership styles of department heads specifically in terms of collaboration. At present no data yet have been established on the collaborative leadership styles of the department heads in the municipal government of Mambusao, Capiz. It is on this premise that this study was conducted.

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Statement of the Problem The study aimed to determine the collaborative leadership styles of the department heads in the municipal government of Mambusao, Capiz. It specifically sought answers to the following questions: 1. What is the socio-demographic profile of the respondents as to age, sex, civil status, monthly family income, status of appointment,and number of years in service? 2. What is the collaborative leadership style of the department heads in the municipal government of

Mambusao, Capiz as perceived by their subordinatesand when categorized into contributive leadership,

cooperative leadership, or connected leadership? 3. Is there a significant difference in the perception of their subordinates in the collaborative leadership style when grouped according to age, sex, civil status, monthly family income, status of appointment and number of years in service? Is there a significant difference in the perception of the respondentsin the three categories of collaborative leadership style when they are grouped according to age, sex, civil status, monthly family income, status of appointment, and number of years in service? Significance of the Study This study will help the readers understand the nature of leadership of the department heads in their municipal government. Specifically, this study will provide information to the following. The Department Heads.The results of this study will be beneficial to the department heads of the municipal

4.

3 government for they will understand the nature of their leadership style. These will also provide them ideas on how they treat their subordinates and how they are look up by their subordinates with the leadership style they have. The Staff of the Different Departments. Results of the study will make them aware of the collaborative leadership style of their department heads. With these, they will know how to adjust and at least they know what to do and how to deal with their respective department heads in terms of cooperation and collaboration. Likewise, the findings will make them understand better their department heads. The Municipal Officials. The results of the study will give further information to the municipal officials especially the local chief executive and the council on how the department heads work with their colleagues and subordinates with regards to collaboration for it will directly affect the kind of services they offer to the public. The Community.The study will give the public the knowledge of the type of leadership the municipal government specifically the department heads have who directly facilitate the services of the government to the people in the community. The Future Researchers. Finally, this study may be beneficial to future researchers who may be interested in pursuing further studies on collaborative leadership style of the department heads and even other officials appointive or elective not only in the municipal government but even in the provincial level. Scope and Delimitations of the Study The study was conducted in all departments of the municipal government of Mambusao, Capiz during the school year 2011-2012. The respondents were all the subordinates of the department heads of the municipal government of Mambusao. The study determined the perception of the subordinates of the leadership style of their department heads.The collaborative leadership styleof department heads was categorized into contributive leader, cooperative leader and connected leader.A questionnaire was utilized which consists of 15 item statements in each category of collaborative leadership style. Frequency counts, mean, and average were used in the descriptive

4 analysis, while a T-test and analysis of variance were used in the differences. Definition of Terms Collaborative leadership is an emerging body of

theory and management practice which is focused on the leadership skills and attributes need to deliver results across organizational

boundaries(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leadership). Contributive leadership refers to a type of

leadership that avoids entitlement over others and makes efforts to contribute productively with others (Hanson, 2009). Cooperative leadership refers to a type of leadership that avoids domination over others and makes efforts to cooperate respectfully with others (Hanson, 2009). Connected leadership refers to a type of leadership that avoids withdrawal from others and makes efforts to connect trustfully with others(Hanson, 2009). Leadership is the process of social influence in

which one person can enlist the aid and support of others in the accomplishment of a common task.Leadership is a relationship and guiding that of involves others the mobilizing, desired influencing,

toward

goals(Wolinski,

2010).

5

CHAPTER II REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE Leadership Style Leadership providing style is the manner and approach of

direction,

implementing

plans,

and

motivating

people. According modern age more which

to Lewin(2004),good leadership in the importantly requires and attitudes relate and to

behaviors

characterize

humanity.According to Clark (2008), implicit in leadership behavior is the ability to work with others, to be in relationship, and to collaborate. Contemporary theories

6 about leadership have shifted toward from a focus on act the of

individual

“leader”

the

collective

“leadership.” For leadership to work well, it must be able to connect their expectations, aims and activities to a basic purpose or philosophy of the organization. vital This

foundational points for

philosophy employees' significant

should

provide and

reference an

decisions factor in

actions

increasingly organizations. Effective challenge

modern

'empowered'

leaders to

inspire

followers to

because risky

they but

them

contribute

sometimes

potentially beneficial ventures. In many cases, a leader acquires skills through years of trial and error, often adapting strategies and techniques to suit the occasion. One of the most critical elements of leadership is team building. Successful leaders are renowned for their

ability to entrust workers on to great individual feats, and to achieve superb organizational results through the efforts Leaders of are their workforce (Sarros& in Woodman, their 1993). to

effective

primarily

ability

comprehend, visualize and articulate to their peers and subordinates the opportunities and threats facing the

organization through team involvement. The involvement of individuals and teams in everyday life of an organization

7 are essential tools of team building leaders. In terms of organizational leadership, team building requires the

ability to lead by example, to generate commitment and trust through and that to example, clearly to involve and a inspire vision.

followers,

communicate

Essentially, effective team building means that leaders take on the mantle of role model. Motivation and

involvement of followers is the key to team building and effective team leadership. Leadership skills are based on leadership behavior. Skills alone do not make leaders - style and behavior do. If you are interested start with in leadership leadership training and “Good

development

behavior.

leaders are made not born”. Good leaders develop through a never ending process of self-study, education, training, and experience (Lewin, 2004). It is clear that effective leadership performance. success are can make a the difference to organizational of leadership is on that a

However, not as

determinants What is

clear-cut.

clear relies

successful combination and

organizational of traits,

leadership

skills,

attitudes,

environmental Woodman,

intra-organizational

conditions

(Sarros&

1993). The five main attributes or competencies required for effective leadership within an organization are

8 identified setting as follows; (1) vision and creativity; (3) (2)

objectives/achieving

targets;

confident

decision making; (4) team building; (5) coaching. However with these five skills in place hand in hand with the organizational goals in mind, organizational outcomes and effective leadership success will more often than not be achieved. A appears major to aspect the and of effective of of leadership clear those and therefore specific

establishment the attainment

objectives

objectives.

Achieving objectives requires the alignment of staff to the vision underlying these objectives consistent (Rubin, and 2002).

Without

alignment

through

constant

communication, objectives are not realized and the vision fails, leaving followers with a sense of bewilderment.

Setting and achieving realistic objectives means making the hard decision; that is, being prepared to take small losses for bigger gains in the long is term. When a

sufficiently

long-term

approach

adopted,

leaders

encourage organizations to become more market driven and competitive. also need Setting be and achieving realistic and objectives control

to

customer-focused

quality

driven, otherwise they will operate under a meaningless cloud.

9 Another key element of effective leadership within organizations is action-centered focus, identified through confident decision-making behavior. In the modern age good leaders are an enabling force, helping people and

organizations to perform and develop, which implies that a sophisticated alignment be achieved - of people's needs, and the aims of the organization. Effective leadership does not necessarily require

great technical or intellectual capacity. These attributes might help, but they are not pivotal. Decision making of this nature encourages participation and commits the

organization to plans and strategies that result from the decision-making confident conviction, process. Because it is action-centered, of initiative, risk-taking

decision

making

consists and

assertiveness

calculated

(Sarros& Woodman, 1993). Leaders maintain their calm and make decisions that infuse This themselves infusion of the throughout is achieved the by

organization‟s involving staff

culture. in

every

facet

decision-making

process, and ensuring that the process is consistent with performance of staff and organizational a major role objectives. in Participation demand on

plays

situational

leadership. Today‟s leaders must be willing and able to identify situational demands, and of selecting or

10 designing appropriate methods of dealing with them. In the normal scheme of things, leaders take time to consult and decide, to plan ahead with calculated risk. However, in a world of turmoil and unpredictable market forces, quick but sound decisions are the norm. This type of decision making takes conviction, guts, and determination: leaders must become more comfortable in being assertive and “going for it” (Kanter, of the 1994). need for There‟s leaders an to increasing generate and

understanding

communicate visions, to inspire and involve others. The major outcomes of team building leadership are motivated followers, practices, increased and self-esteem, focus and innovative enthusiasm. work Many

achievement

organizations are relying on their leaders to assume a coaching role in order to achieve performance excellence in individuals and teams. The coaching process is vital to achieving performance excellence in today‟s streamlined, diverse, global, and knowledge-based organizations

(Brocato, 2003). Rather than leading by intuition, leaders will have to learn what people want, study the nature of thought and human desire, and be expert listeners (Brown, 2003). Organizations are in transition from an old

paradigm of constancy, conformity and command driven, to a new paradigm of change, collaboration, and coaching

11 (giving guidance and preparing others to be self-reliant). The word “coach” (originally a four-wheeled carriage) is to “convey a valued person from where he or she is to where he or she wants to be” (Brocato, 2003). It is

important to note that in this meaning we are carrying a person to where he or she wants to be, not pushing them to where we want them to be. From this concept we understand that the coach is the vehicle that facilitates performance change; however, it is up to each individual we are

coaching to have the “want” to make the change. The coach merely helps the change happen (Brocato, 2003). Different types, performance issues and problems that exist may be addressed by the coaching process, or in other words

addressed by providing guidance to others so that they may be self-reliant and resolve many of the issues themselves. Self-awareness is the coach‟s quantum leap to

understanding. Self-awareness is the hallmark of effective leaders. Successful leaders understand what motivates people and how their strengths and weaknesses influence their

decisions, actions, and relationships. Successful leaders also understand the importance of developing a critical quality called leadership character (Clark, 2008). One of the best ways to achieve this self-awareness and

12 leadership character is through self-reflection on

personal skills and behaviors. The instrumented learning (self-directed effective assessment) in the approach is one of the most Being

tools

self-reflection

process.

self-aware increases an individual‟s effectiveness in a range of people situations and provides insights into the behaviors of others. It helps develop a role essential for today‟s leaders and managers, coaching for improvement

(Brocato, 2003). Collaborative Leadership Clark efforts (2008) to discussed from a study of organization‟s organizational

change

autocratic

leadership to a more collaborative working environment. Taking the form of a literary portrait, the study analyzes an example of action learning about collaborative leadership. The portrait will be of the agency‟s change, with special attention given to the issue facing the

leadership team as it wrestles to change from top-down to collaborative leadership practice. There have been a

number of research projects and reviews of key lessons for Collaboration leaders but it all came down to some similar themes. Carter (2000) defines five qualities of a

collaborative leader:  Willingness to take risks

13     Eager listeners Passion for the cause Optimistic about the future Able to share knowledge, power and credit In a similar way, Cameron (1998) list ten key lessons for a successful collaborative leader:   Find the personal motive for collaborating Find ways of simplifying complex situations for your people  Prepare for how you are going to handle conflict well in advance  Recognize that there are some people or organizations you just can‟t partner with   Have the courage to act for the long term Actively manage the tension between focusing on delivery and on building relationships   Invest in strong personal relationships at all levels Inject energy, passion and drive into your leadership style   Have the confidence to share the credit generously Continually particular: develop empathy, your interpersonal skills, in

patience,

tenacity,

holding

difficult conversations, and coalition building.

14 Rubin (2002), author and President of the Institute of Collaborative Leadership Leadership: has written Developing in his book

“Collaborative

Effective

Partnerships for Communities and Schools‟ asks “Who is a collaborative leader?” and answers “You are a

collaborative leader once you have accepted responsibility for building – or helping to ensure the success of – a heterogeneous team to accomplish a shared purpose. Your tools are (1) the purposeful exercise of your behavior, communication, and organizational resources in order to affect the perspective, beliefs, and behaviors of another person (generally a collaborative partner) to influence that person‟s relationship with you and your collaborative enterprise and (2) the structure and climate of an

environment that supports the collaborative relationship. Cameron collaborative (1998) leader identifies as the the basic of task results of the

delivery

across

boundaries between different organizations. Getting value from difference is at the heart of the collaborative

leader‟s task… they have to learn to share control, and to trust a partner to deliver, even though that partner may operate very differently from themselves. If it‟s not clear already, leadership is without

doubt mostly about behavior, especially towards others.

15 People who strive for these things generally come to be regarded and respected as a leader by their people:  Integrity – the most important requirement; without it everything else is for nothing.  Having an effective appreciation and approach towards corporate responsibility, so that the need to make

profitis balanced with wider social and environmental responsibilities.  Being very grown-up – never getting emotionally negative with people – no shouting or ranting, even if you feel very upset or angry.  Leading by example – always be seen to be working harder and more determinedly than anyone else.    Helping alongside your people when they need it. Fairness – treating everyone equally and on merit. Being firm and clear dealing with bad or unethical

behavior.  Listening to and really understanding people, and show them that you understand (this doesn‟t mean you have to agree with everyone – understanding is different to

agreeing).  Always taking the responsibility and blame for your

people‟s mistakes.

16     Always giving your people the credit for your successes. Never self-promoting. Backing-up and supporting your people. Being decisive – even if the decision is to delegate or do nothing if appropriate – but be seen to be making fair and balanced decisions.  Asking for people‟s views, but remain neutral and

objective.  Being honest but sensitive in the way that you give bad news or criticism.  Always doing what you say you will do – keeping your promises.  Working hard to and become at expert at what your you do

technically,

understanding

people‟s

technical abilities and challenges.  Encouraging your people to grow, to learn and to take on as much as they want to, at a pace they can handle.  Always accentuating the positive (say „do it like this‟, not „don‟t do it like that‟).  Smiling and encouraging others to be happy and enjoy themselves.

17  Relaxing – breaking down the barriers and the leadership awe – and giving your people and yourself time to get to know and respect each other.     Taking notes and keeping good records. Planning and prioritizing. Managing your time well and helping others to do so too. Involving your people in your thinking and especially in managing change.  Reading good books, and taking advice from good people, to help develop your own understanding of yourself, and particularly of other people‟s weaknesses (some of the best books for leadership are not about business at all – they are about people who triumph over adversity.  Achieve the company tasks and objectives, while

maintaining your integrity, the trust of your people, are a balancing the corporate aims with the needs of the world beyond. In the study of Pascal (2008), collaboration creates high trust which leads to high performance and high

accountability: The best way to create a high-performance team that is and truly accountable that and is is through built the as are trust, people natural

ownership

alignment

collaborate.

Performance

accountability

outcomes when people contribute their experience, wisdom,

18 and knowledge while simultaneously building ownership and alignment for the result. Becoming a collaborative leader and creating a collaborative work culture is a journey not a destination: it took years to develop this current

approach to leadership and organizations. The journey to a collaborative way of working is a daily challenge of

learning and transformation. Participative leadership theories state that it is important to involve lower-rung team members in decisionmaking processes. These theories argue that participation leads to a greater understanding of the issues at hand and increased commitment among team members The role of the leader has expanded to include coach, visionary, motivator, strategist and team builder, while setting the best direction for the company. To keep up with the changes in today's marketplace, effective leaders must continually uncover innovative ways to enhance their organization's success and increase their team's

performance as well as their own personal productivity. A collaborative leadership style suggests that the supervisor involves the staff in setting the direction of the school(Cameron,1998).If each party of must the collaboration recognize other. and And is to be the

effective, different

respect

culture

traditional

19 development traditional paths don‟t prepare leaders which well is for this on

management

development,

based

giving potential managers a team of people and a set of resources to control - and success is rewarded with more people and more resources to control. By contrast,

collaboration requires managers to achieve success through people and resources outside their control and for this they have had no preparation.

Cooperative Leadership Cooperative leadership enables the manager or leader to empower people and maximize their own potentials as well as their the move staff while of creating a learning culture whose mutual

within efforts

workplace them

people a

acting

together for

towards

shared

vision

benefit (Carter, 2000). In this program, you'll be introduced to the core skills, characteristics leader; and competencies you with the of the highly to

effective

providing

foundation

accelerate your success not only in your career but in your personal life as well. The cooperative leadership model delivers incredible results, such as an increase in profitability, performance

20 and productivity as well as a decrease in internal

conflicts, problems and attrition. Whether you're a staff of one or one provide hundred, utilizing and these leadership with a

principles

businesses

individuals

unique competitive advantage that will keep you positioned on top and enable you to become a successful coach and leader. A cooperative leader really values and trusts the

interdependence of relationships. Active listening is a leading characteristic of a cooperative leader and crosses all job functions. Executives who are cooperative leaders give their companies a tremendous competitive advantage since they are open to listening and learning so are less likely to be blindsided by surprise market developments, new technology or an emerging competitor(Ross,2009). Connected Leader Connected leadership views leadership holistically,

as an inclusive and collective activity shared by many, if not all, organizational members. It broadens the approach to leadership as development to by going beyond the work with

leaders

individuals

include

links

between

individuals and the systems and cultures in which they work, enacting leadership helps together. The connected their

leadership

approach

organizations

transform

21 leadership direction culture of and leadership practices engagement in the

greater

collaboration,

across

boundaries, dialogue and learning, embracing differences, and the direct involvement of people at all levels of the organization in leadership work (Pascal,2008).

CHAPTER III METHODOLOGY Time and Place of the Study The study was conductedin all the departments of municipal government of Mambusao, Capiz during the second semester of school year 2011-1012. Respondents of the Study The respondents of the study were all the subordinates of all the department heads in the different departments under the municipal government of Mambusao, Capiz. There were 52(permanent and casual) employees under the different department headsof the municipal government of Mambusao, Capiz. (The researcher decided to include the total population as respondents). The Research Instrument A questionnaire was used to gather the data in this study. It was a collaborative leadership style questionnaire adopted from Hanson (2009).It was first pilot tested in the municipal government of Jamindan, Capiz.

22 To test its reliability, it was subjected to Cronbach‟s Alpha. The coefficient of reliability was .967. This result indicated that the questionnaire was reliable. The instrument of this study was composed of two parts. Part One gathered the socio-demographic profile of the respondents such as age, sex, civil status, monthly family income, status of appointment and number of years in service. Part Two of the questionnaire was used to measure the collaborative leadership style of the department heads which wascategorized into three aspects of collaboration: the contributive leadership, cooperative leadership, and connected leadership. Each category was made up of 15 item statements. In answering the instrument, the following response set was used: Always- 5, Often - 4, Occasionally – 3, Seldom – 2,and Never – 1. Operational Definition of Terms Important terms wereoperationally defined in this

section for the purpose of providing a definite point of reference and to clarify certain points in the study. Collaborative obtained leadership by the style leadership respondents refers using to the the scores

collaborative the three

questionnaire

involving

categories. Scores werearbitrarily categorized as: Scale 4.21 – 5.00 3.41 – 4.20 2.61 – 3.40 1.81 – 2.60 1.00 – 1.80 Description Excellent Very Good Good Fair Poor

23 Contributing leadership refers to the scores obtained by the respondents in the contributing leadership aspect of collaborative leadership style questionnaire. Scores

were arbitrarily categorized as: Scale 4.21 – 5.00 3.41 – 4.20 2.61 – 3.40 1.81 – 2.60 1.00 – 1.80 Description Excellent Very Good Good Fair Poor

Cooperative leadership refers to the scores obtained by the respondents in the cooperative leadership aspect of collaborative leadership style questionnaire. Scores were arbitrarily categorized as: Scale 4.21 – 5.00 3.41 – 4.20 2.61 – 3.40 1.81 – 2.60 1.00 – 1.80 Description Excellent Very Good Good Fair Poor

Connected leadership refers to the scores obtained by the respondents in the connected leadership aspect of

collaborative leadership style questionnaire. Scores were arbitrarily categorized as:

24 Scale 4.21 – 5.00 3.41 – 4.20 2.61 – 3.40 1.81 – 2.60 1.00 – 1.80 Description Excellent Very Good Good Fair Poor

Age refers to the actual age of the respondents at the time it wasconducted. Age was categorized into: 56 years old and above 46-55 years old 36-45 years old Below 35 years old Sexrefers female. Civil status refers to whether the respondents were single, married, or separated/widow/widower. Status of appointmentrefers to the present Plantilla position of the respondents. It was categorized into to whether the respondent was male or

permanent and casual employees. Monthly family income refers to the total monthly

earnings of the respondents in the family or household. It was categorized into: Php20,001 and above Php10,001-Php20,000

25 Php10,000 and below Number of years in servicerefers to the number of years the respondents have stayed in their position as subordinates. It was categorized into: 21 years and above 11-20 years 10 years and below Data Gathering Procedure In gathering the data, the researcher asked the approval of the Campus Administrator to conduct the study. The researcher also sought permission from the municipal government executive to conduct the study in the different offices. It was then followed by the actual conduct and distribution of questionnaires to the respondents. After gathering the needed data, tabulation, processing and interpretation followed. Statistical Tools For descriptive purposes, measures such as mean, frequency distributions, and percentage were used to analyze the data. T-test and One-way ANOVA were also used to determine significant differences.

26

CHAPTER IV RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Socio-demographic Profile of the Respondents Table 1.0 presents the socio-demographic profile of the respondents in terms of age, sex, civil status,

monthly family income, status of appointment, and number of years in service. Data show that most (42.3%) of the respondents were in the age bracket of 36-45 years old, 14 (26.9%) were in the age bracket 46-55, 9 (17.3%) were below 35 years old and only 7 (13.5%) were 56 years and above of age. The mean of 43.48 years old indicates that the respondents were middle aged. As to sex, majority were females (34 or 65.4%) while males were 18 (34.6%). This shows that majority of the

27 employees in the municipal government of Mambusao, Capiz were females. In terms of civil status, respondents who are married were 42 (80.8%), and only 10 (19.2%) were single. This means that majority of the employees were married. As to monthly family income, most or 22 (42.3%) of the respondents had amonthly family income of Php10,001Php20,000, 21 (40.4%) had an income below Php10,000, and only 9 (17.3%) had a monthly family income of Php20,001 and above. The mean monthly family income of Php15,221.54 indicates that the employees receive a salary just enough for the basic needs of the family. The same table (Table 1.0) reveals the status of

appointment of the respondents. Of the 52 subordinates, majority(43 or 82.7%) had a permanent status, while 9

(17.3%) were casual employees. This means that there were still employees who could be removed or replaced. As to the number of years in service, 21 (40.4%) of the respondents were 10 years and below in service,

19(36.5%) were 11-20 years in service, and12 (23.1%) were 21 years and above in service.

28 Table 1.0 Socio-demographic profile of the respondents. VARIABLEFREQUENCY Age 56 years old and above 46-55 years old 36-45 years old Below 35 years old TOTAL MEAN AGE 43.48 7 14 22 9 52 13.5 26.9 42.3 17.3 100 PERCENTAGE

Table 1.0 continued… VARIABLE Sex Male Female TOTAL Civil status Single Married TOTAL Status of Appointment Casual 9 17.3 10 42 52 19.2 80.8 100 18 34 52 34.6 65.4 100 FREQUENCY PERCENTAGE

29 Permanent TOTAL Family Monthly Income Php20,001 and above Php10,001-Php20,000 P10,000 and below21 TOTAL MEAN 52 Php15,221.54 100 9 22 40.4 17.3 42.3 43 52 100 82.7

Table 1.0 continued… VARIABLE FREQUENCY PERCENTAGE

Number of Years in Service 21 Years and above 12 11-20 10 Years and below TOTAL MEAN 52 14.76 21 100 19 40.4 23.1 36.5

Perception of the Respondents on the Different Categories of the Collaborative Leadership Style of Department Heads

30 Contributive Leadership Style Table 2a reflects the collaborative leadership style of the department heads in the municipal government of Mambusao, Capiz as perceived by their subordinates in

terms of contributive leadership style. Data show that most (21 or 40.4%) of the respondents perceived department the contributive “very leadership a little style over of their

heads

good”,

one-fourth

(26.9%) perceived it “excellent”, and the same percentage perceived it “good”. Only 2 (3.8%)and 1 (1.9%) perceived the contributive leadership style of their department

heads “fair” and “poor” respectively. The mean of 3.74 indicates that the contributive leadership of the

department heads as perceived by their subordinates was “very good”. This means that department heads give their subordinates chance to contribute their knowledge and

skills in leading or managing the department. Cooperative Leadership Style The same table (Table 2a) shows that of the 52

respondents, 24 (46.2%) of them perceived the cooperative leadership style of their department heads “very good”; 15 (28.8%), “good”; 11 (21.2%) “excellent” and only 1 (1.9%) perceived the cooperative leadership style of their

department heads“poor” and “fair”, respectively. The mean

31 of 3.69 indicates This a “very that good” the cooperative department leadership heads work

style.

implies

cooperatively with their subordinates. Connected Leadership Style Data in the same table (Table 2a) reveals that more than half or 31 (59.6%) of the respondentsperceived the connected leadership style of their department heads“very good”; 1 (26.9%) perceived it “excellent”; 3 (5.8%)

“good”and “fair”, respectively. The mean of 4.0 indicates a “very good” connected leadership style.This implies that department heads communicates to their subordinates their plans and programs and show high regards for the

collaborative tasks. Table 2a.Contributive leadership of the department heads. LEADERSHIP STYLE Contributive Leadership Excellent Very Good Good Fair Poor TOTAL 2 3.8 1 1.9 52 100 14 26.9 21 14 26.9 40.4 FREQUENCY PERCENTAGE

32 MEAN 3.74VERY GOOD

Cooperative Leadership Excellent Very Good Good Fair Poor TOTAL MEAN Table 2a continued… LEADERSHIP STYLE Connected Leadership Excellent Very Good Good Fair TOTAL Mean 3 5.8 3 52 4.00 5.8 100 VERY GOOD 15 31 59.6 26.9 FREQUENCY PERCENTAGE 1 52 3.69 11 24 15 1 1.9 100 VERY GOOD 21.2 46.2 28.8 1.9

Collaborative Leadership Style of the Department Heads in the Municipal Government of Mambusao, Capiz as Perceived by their Subordinates

33 Table 3.0 presents the summary of the collaborative leadership style of the department heads as perceived by their subordinates. Result showed that the subordinates of the department heads perceived their contributive

leadership style as “very good” with the mean score of 3.74. The cooperative leadership style, had a mean 3.69, interpreted as “very good”, while for the connected

leadership style, the subordinates perceived it as “very good” with a mean of 4.00. As a whole, the collaborative leadership style of the department heads in the municipal government of Mambusao, Capiz as perceived by their subordinates was “very good” with the grand mean of 3.81. Collaborative Leadership Styleof the Department Head as Perceived by the Respondents per Item Statement in Different Categories Contributive Leadership Table 3.1 shows the perceived collaborative

leadership style in terms of contributive leadership. The respondents department perceived heads the contributive as style of by their their

“excellent”

indicated

responses in item 10. Their perception as “very good” as revealed by their responses in items 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 11, 12, 13, 14 and 15. The respondents perceived their

34 department heads “good” as indicated in items 3, 5, 7 and 9. Cooperative Leadership Table 3.2 shows the perceived collaborative

leadership style in terms of cooperative leadership. Of the 15 item statements, only item 2 revealed that the perception of the respondents was “excellent”. Their

response in item statements 4, 6, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 and 15 revealed that the perception of the respondents was “very good”. The respondents of the perceived the heads cooperative “good” as

leadership

style

department

indicated by their responses in items 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9. Connected Leadership Data in Table 3.3 further revealed the collaborative leadership style of the department heads in terms of

connected leadership. The perception of the respondents was “excellent” as revealed by their responses in items 6, 10, 11, 12 and 13. Their responses in items 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 14 and 15 indicated that their perception was “very good”. Table 3.0 Collaborative leadership style of the department heads.

35 VERBAL
COLLABORATIVE LEADERSHIP STYLE MEAN SD INTERPRETATION

Contributive Leadership Cooperative Leadership3.69 Connected Leadership GRAND MEAN

3.74 .61902 4.00 3.81

.74738Very Good Very Good .60872 Very Good .57775Very Good

Table 3.1 Contributive leadership style as perceived by the respondents per item statement. VERBAL ITEM STATEMENT

MEAN

INTERPRETATION

1. He/she does not view self as “all knowing” or “all powerful” and rule over others.3.4231 Very Good 2. He/she masterfully lead organizations into the future with visionary thinking. 4.0577Very Good 3. He/she does not arrogantly bragabout own accomplishments asbeing superior. 3.2500 Good 4. He/she makes special efforts toinvest in workbeyond own self-interest. 3.9423 Very Good 5. He/she does not dictate and intimidate others with a presumed sense of self-importance.3.0385 Good 6. He/she strives to respectfully persuade others.3.8077 Very Good

36 7. He/she does not create special privileges for self and expect special treatment from others. 3.1154 8.He/she creates activity that promotes useful contributions to the organization. 4.1538Very Good 9. He/she does not place selfcentered interests ahead of useful effort. 3.0192 Good 10.He/she creates activity that promotes meaningfulwork.4.3269 Excellent

Good

Table 3.1 continued… VERBAL ITEM STATEMENT

MEAN

INTERPRETATION

11. He/she helps others to turn concerns into positive actions that connect to the larger goals. 4.0192 12. He/she is open to feedback.4.0192 13. He/she can frame complex problems in ways thatothers can understand and respond competently. 4.0000 Very Good 14. He/she valued the differences of opinion and perspectives.4.1154 15. He/she can successfully facilitate a group without his/ her own issues or agendas getting in the way. 3.7885Very Good Grand Mean 3.74 Very Good

Very Good Very Good

Very Good

37 Table 3.2 Cooperative leadership style as perceived by the respondents per item statement. VERBAL ITEM STATEMENT 1. He/she does not control others for the purpose of demonstrating power; or act in a stubborn manner. 2.9808 Good 2. He/she promotes the attitude for treating others as equals. 4.2692 Excellent

MEAN

INTERPRETATION

3. He/she tries to control others with the use of personal criticism.2.9808 Table 3.2 continued… VERBAL ITEM STATEMENT 4. He/she works toward helping others do better. 4.0385 5. He/she does not manipulate others or maneuver others for self-serving advantage. 2.9615 6. He/she guides others toward creating mutualwork benefit.4.1731 7. He/she does not resist cooperation or intentionally works against others.3.3846 Good 8. He/she seek out ways to affirm others. 3.6538 Very Good 9. He/she does not become quick to retaliate inmoody and crabby ways.3.2692 10. He/she understands the importance ofencouraging others. 3.7500Very Good

Good

MEAN

INTERPRETATION

Very Good

Good

Very Good

Good

38 11. He/she can effectively get input from everyone “at the table”.

3.7115Very Good

12. He/she can tap the expertise of others and utilizethem in effective and appropriate ways. 3.9423Very Good 13. He/she listens carefully to the views of others. 4.1154Very Good 14. He/she can separate people and personalitiesfrom the problems.3.8846Very Good
15. He/she can adapt to changing demands.4.1923Very Good

Grand Mean 3.69 Very Good Table 3.3 Connected leadership style as perceived by the respondents per item statement. VERBAL ITEM STATEMENT 1. He/she does not seem indifferent to task related activities. 3.6731 2. He/she express positive energy toward task related activities.

MEAN

INTERPRETATION

Very Good

4.1923

Very Good

3. He/she does not act as if cannot relate to others orseems insensitive to others. 3.5769 4. He/she initiate efforts in response to others.

Very Good

3.8462 Very Good

5. He/she does not avoid using energy for ordinary work activity. 3.5385

Very Good

6. He/she responds constructively and initiate action toward the tasks. 4.2500 Excellent

39 7. He/she is not hesitant to express thoughts and ideas or remain inexpressive. 3.9615 Very Good 8. He/she assertively expresses ideas and thoughts. 4.0962 9. He/she does not avoid interacting with others and become disconnected with others. 3.5769

Very Good

Very Good

10. He/she is friendly and initiate friendly interactions with others. 4.4038 Excellent

Table 3.3 continued… VERBAL ITEM STATEMENT 11. He/she can make concessions in his/her own viewpoints to achieve results for the greater whole or cause. 4.2115 12. He/she is comfortable and successful working with different belief, gender, age and religion. 4.3846 Excellent 13. He/she can connect actions to larger goals. 4.4423 14. He/she is resilient when confronted or attacked verbally. 3.7692

MEAN

INTERPRETATION

Excellent

Excellent

Very Good

15. He/she can effectively confront difficultinterpersonal issues. 4.0769 Grand Mean 4.00

Very Good Very Good

40

Differences in the Perception of the Subordinates of the CollaborativeLeadership Style of the Department Heads when Grouped According to Variables In Table 4.0presents style the of the differencein department the heads

collaborative

leadership

when grouped according to different variables. Statistical analysis revealed that casual and permanent subordinates differed significantly, a significant difference, t=3.23 with p=.002, in their perception. There was also a

significant, F=3.937 with p=.026, in the perception of the subordinates when they were grouped according to monthly family income. Differences in the Perception of the Subordinates of the Different Categories of Collaborative Leadership Style When Grouped According to Variables Contributive Leadership Style Table 4.1 presents the difference in the perception of the respondents on the contributive leadership style of the department heads when grouped according to different variables. Result revealed that there was a significant difference, t=2.343 with p=.023, in the perception of the respondents when they were grouped according to status of appointment. A significant difference, F=4.146 with

41 p=.022, also existed in their perception when grouped

according to monthly family income. Cooperative Leadership Style Table 4.2 shows the difference in the perception of the respondents of cooperative leadership style of their department variables. heads Result when grouped that according status to of different appointment

revealed

(t=3.528, p=.001), monthly family income (F=4.941, p=.011) and number of years in service (F=3.649, p=.033)

significantly affected the perception of the respondents of the cooperative leadership style of the department

heads in the municipal government of Mambusao, Capiz. Connected Leadership Style Table 4.3 presents the difference on the perception of the respondents of the connected leadership style of their department heads when grouped according to different variables. difference Data on show that there of was the a significant when

the

perception

respondents

classified according to status of appointment (t=2.581, p=.013) and monthly family income (F=1.857, p=.017). Table 4.0. Difference in the subordinates of the collaborative grouped according to variables. perception leadership of the stylewhen

42 VARIABLE Age Sex Civil Status Status of Appointment Monthly Family Income STATISTICS F-test t-test t-test t-test F-test VALUE 2.669 .023 1.419 3.230* 3.927* 1.226 P-VALUE 0.58 .982 .162 .002 SIGNIFICANCE Not Significant Not Significant Not Significant Significant

.026Significant .302 Not Significant

No. of Years inF-test Service

*Significance set at 0.05 alpha Table 4.1.Difference in the perception of the subordinates of the contributive leadership style when grouped according to variables. VARIABLE Age Sex Civil Status Status of Appointment STATISTICS F-test t-test t-test t-test VALUE P-VALUE SIGNIFICANCE

2.3400.85Not Significant .093 1.585 .926 .119 Not Significant Not Significant

2.343* .023Significant

Monthly Family F-test4.146* .022Significant Income No. of Years in Service F-test .271.764Not Significant

*Significance set at 0.05 alpha

43 Table 4.2.Difference in the perception of the subordinates of the cooperative leadership style when grouped according to variables. VARIABLE Age Sex Civil Status Status of Appointment STATISTICS F-test VALUE P-VALUE SIGNIFICANCE

1.202 0.20Not Significant

t-test .357.723Not Significant t-test t-test 1.499 3.528* 4.941* .140Not Significant .001 Significant

Family Monthly F-test Income

.011Significant

No. of Years F-test 3.649*.033Significant in Service *Significance set at 0.05 alpha Table 4.3.Difference on the perception of the subordinates of the connected leadership style when grouped according to variables.

VARIABLE Age Sex Civil Status Status of Appointment

STATISTICS F-test t-test t-test t-test F-test F-test

VALUE 1.479

P-VALUE 0.232

SIGNIFICANCE Not Significant

.412.682Not Significant .574.568 Not Significant 2.581* 1.857 .013Significant .017Significant

Monthly Family Income No. of Years in Service

1.480 .238 Not Significant

44 *Significance set at 0.05 alpha.

CHAPTER V SUMMARY, CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATION Summary This study was conducted in all the department in the municipal government of Mambusao, Capiz during the school year 2011-2012. It aimed primarily to determine the perception of the subordinates of the collaborative

leadership style of their department heads. Specifically, it aimed to find out the socio-demographic profile of the respondents as to age, sex, civil status, status of

appointment, monthly family income, and number of years in

45 service; to determine the collaborative leadership style of the department heads in the municipal government of Mambusao, Capiz as perceived by their subordinates as a whole and when categorized into contributive leadership, cooperative determine leadership, the difference or in connected the leadership; of to the

perception

subordinates in the collaborative leadership style when grouped according to age, sex, civil status, status of appointment, monthly family income, and number of years in service; and to find out if there is a significant

difference in the perception of the respondents in the three categories of collaborative leadership style when grouped according to age, sex, civil status, status of appointment, monthly family income, and number of years in service. The respondents of in all the of the this study were the as 52 a

subordinates population, Capiz. The

department

heads

taken of

municipal instrument was used

government of to this gather of the

Mambusao, was on a the

main It the

study data

questionnaire. perception of

respondents

collaborative

leadership style adopted from Hanson (2009). Results of the study were analyzed using frequency count, percentage and mean. T-test and F-test were used to determine the

46 significant respondents. The study revealed that majority of the respondents were on the age bracket permanent of 36-45 years with old, female, family difference in the perception of the

married,

having

status,

monthly

income of Php10,001-Php20,000, and 10 years and below in service. Results further revealed that the respondents of this study perceived the overall collaborative leadership style of their department heads as “very good”. In terms of the categories of collaborative leadership style, the

respondents‟ perception was “very good” of contributive, cooperative, and connected leadership styles. To determine if there was a significant difference on the perception of the of respondents department t-test and on the collaborative when grouped used.

leadership according

style to

the

heads F-test

variables,

were

Results revealed that status of appointment and monthly family income significantly affected the perception of the respondents. In terms of cooperative leadership style, a significant difference existed in the perception of the respondents when grouped according to status of

appointment, monthly family income, and number of years in service. Likewise, there was a significant difference in

47 the perception style of the respondents grouped of the to connected status of

leadership

when

according

appointment and monthly family income. Conclusions Based on the findings of the study, the researcher had drawn the following conclusions. 1. Most of the students were on the age bracket of 36-45 years old, female, married, having permanent status of appointment, with and monthly within family the 10 income years of and

Php10,001-Php20,000, below in service. 2. The subordinates

of

all

the

department

heads

perceived the overall collaborative leadership style of their department heads as “very good,”and

considering the three categories of the collaborative leadership good” style, their perception was also “very

of the contributive, cooperative and connected styles of their the of their department heads. in This the work the

leadership result

implies

that

department Mambusao,

heads

municipal

government with they

Capiz in

collaboratively department where

subordinates They also

belong.

consider

their subordinates in the decision making since the

48 contributive leadership style was perceived as “very good.” It further as and implies that in they their manifest the

cooperation leadership

reflected connected

cooperative style as

leadership

perceived by their subordinates. 3. There was a significant difference on perception of the respondents when grouped according to the status of appointment and monthly family income.This means that were the leadership style of the by department those who heads were

perceived

differently

permanent and casuals as well as by those who had high income and low income. 4. There was also a significant difference on the

perception of the respondents when grouped according to status of appointment and monthly family income on the contributive leadership also style. existed on This the

meansSignificant

differences

perception of the respondents when grouped according to status of appointment, monthly family income, and number of years in service on cooperative leadership style. This means of the significant respondents differences found when on the

perception

grouped

according to status of appointment and monthly family income on connected leadership style.

49 Recommendations Based on the conclusions drawn, the researcher had come up with the following recommendations: 1. The department heads should work collaboratively with their subordinates without discrimination as to the status of appointment whether permanent or casual

employees in order to render quality service to the people. 2. The department heads should and also look into the

contributive,

cooperative

connected

leadership

styles of managing their departments so that their subordinates will work collaboratively when they are given the chance to contribute and are connected to the aims or objectives of the department where they belong in order to produce a collective output of service and have an excellent collaborative

leadership style in the department. 3. The subordinates and must work of hand in hand with to the

goals

objectives

the

department

ensure

productive service to the people not only to their department heads. They should be aware of the

leadership style of their department heads so that

50 they can make adjustment on how they would work that would suit to the leadership style of their heads. 4. Another study is recommended as to the collaborative leadership style of the department heads not only in the municipality agencies heads of Mambusao, Capiz, but in other the own

national department

or the

departments chance to

and

giving their

perceive

collaborative leadership styles.

LITERATURE CITED BROCATO (2003). Leadership Effectiveness within Virtual Teams: Investigating Mediating and Moderating Mechanismshttp://www.mastersthesiswriting.com/bl og/sample-dissertations/dissertation-on leadership.html (2003). Center for Creative Leadership.http://www.ccl.org/leadership/researc h/connected.aspx. (1998). Collaborative Leadership: How to succeed in an interconnected world. Lifted August 5, 2011 from http://www.businessballs.com/leadership.htm M. (2000).Information Access Service.http://virtualteamsblog.com/2010/leaders hip effectiveness-within-virtual-teams

BROWN

CAMERON,C.

CARTER,

CLARK, J.T. (2008). Developing Collaborative Leadership: A Study Of Organizational Change Toward Greater Collaboration And Shared Leadership. http://etd.ohiolink.edu/view.cgi?acc_num=antioch 1229720750

51 GAVINO, P. 1997. Leadership behavior of the school administrators in the Panay Island.(Unpublished Dissertation, PSPC Graduate School, Mambusao, Capiz).

HANSON, D. 2009. Collaborative leadership styleSynergisticPsychology Associates, PA. Lifted August 2, 2011 fromhttp://gemalead360.com/collaborativeleadersh ip.html. ANTER, R.M.1994.Harvard Business Review http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collaborative_leade rship K. (2004). Leadership S t y l e s . http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/leader/ leadstl.html M., Ph.D. (2008),Developing a collaborative leadership model for the restoration of the Southwest forests Northcentral University. http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?Ver=1&Exp=08-22D. (2009). Cooperative Leader & Active Listener http://cooperativeintelligenceblog.com/2009/02/0 5/diplomat-dennis-ross-cooperative-leaderactive-listener/ Woodman (1993).Collaborative Leadership in Schools.Leadership Development and School Improvement.http://www.essaytown.com/paper/colla borative-leadership-schools-leadershipdevelopment-school-improvement-effective50634retreived august 24, 2011.

LEWIN,

PASCAL

ROSS,

Sarros&

52

Appendix 1. Letter of Request
Republic of the Philippines CAPIZ STATE UNIVERSITY PoblacionMambusao Campus Mambusao, Capiz

December 14, 2011 HON. JOSE O. ALBA, JR. Municipal Mayor Mambusao, Capiz Sir: Good day! The undersigned is a Fourth Year Bachelor of Arts (AB) student major in Political Science at the Capiz State University, PoblacionMambusao Campus, Mambusao, Capiz. At present I am conducting my thesis study entitled: “Collaborative Leadership Style of the Department Heads of the Municipal Government of Mambusao”. In this regard, I would like to ask permission from your highly respected office to allow me to conduct the said study in the different departments of the municipal government of Mambusao. Rest assured that the data taken will be kept confidential and it will be used for such

53 purpose only. Thank you and more power. Very truly yours, (SGD) JEM JESHUA B. SALISTRE Thesis student Noted: (SGD) LALAINE E. RICARDO Chairman, Advisory com. (SGD) LILLIBETH G. LEONOR, Ed. D. Chairman AB Department

(SGD) NELSON L. BERONDO, Ph. D. Campus Dean (SGD) ROMAN V. BELLEZA, Ed. D. Campus Administrator Approved: (SGD)HON.JOSE O. ALBA, JR. Municipal Mayor

54

Appendix 2.Letter to the Respondents Republic of the Philippines CAPIZ STATE UNIVERSITY PoblacionMambusao Campus Mambusao, Capiz

Dear Respondent, Good day and God Bless. I would like to inform you that I am conducting a research entitled “Collaborative Leadership Styles of Department Heads in the Municipal Government of Mambusao, Capiz” as a requirement for the degree Bachelor of Arts major in Political Science at the Capiz State University, PoblacionMambusao Campus, Mambusao, Capiz. I have chosen you as one of my respondents for this study. Attached is my questionnaire. Kindly answer each item honestly. Rest assured that answers will be kept confidential. Thank you very much for your support and cooperation.

55
Very truly yours, (SGD)JEM JESHUA B. SALISTRE Thesis Student

Appendix 3. Research Instrument “Collaborative Leadership Styles of Department Heads in the Municipal Government of Mambusao, Capiz” Part I. Personal Information Instructions: Please check the item appropriate to your choice or supply the needed data. 1. Name: ___________________________ (Optional)

2. Age: ___________ (as of last birthday) 3. Sex: _______Male _______Female

4. Civil Status: ______Single ______Married _______Widowed _______Separated

5. No. of years in service: _____________ 6. Status of employment: ________permanent

56 ________casual 7. Monthly Family Income: P_________________ Part II. Collaborative Leadership Style Questionnaire Questionnaire A. Contributive Leadership

Below is a list of items that may be used to describe your collaborative leadership style as Department Head. Each item describes a specific kind of collaboration. This is not a test of ability but simply asks you to describe as accurately as you can, your collaborative style as a leader in your respective office or department.

Directions: a. Read each item carefully. b. Think about how frequently you engaged collaboration described by each item. in this

c. Decide whether you always, often, sometimes, occasionally, or never act as described by the item. d. Put a check ( ) on the space under each number corresponding your choice. 5 – Always 4 – Often 3 – Sometimes 2 – Occasionally 1 – Never 5 1. He/she does not view self as “all knowing” or “all powerful” and rule over others. 4 3 2 1

___

___ ___

___ ___

57 2. He/she masterfully lead organizations into the future with visionary thinking. ___

___

___

___

___

3. He/she does not arrogantly brag about own accomplishments as being superior. ___ 4. He/she makes special efforts to invest in workbeyond own self-interest. ___ 5. He/she does not dictate and intimidate others with a presumed sense of self-importance. ___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

5 6. He/she strives to respectfully persuade others. 7. He/she does not create special privileges for self and expect special treatment from others. 8. He/she creates activity that promotes useful contributions to the organization. 9. He/she does not place selfcentered interests ahead of useful effort. ___

4 ___

3 ___

2 ___

1 ___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

10. He/she creates activity that promotes meaningfulwork. ___ 11. He/she helps others to turn concerns into positive actions that connect to the larger goals.___ 12. 13. He/she is open to feedback.___ He/she can frame complex

___

___

___

___

___ ___

___ ___

___ ___

___

___

58 problems in ways thatothers can understand and respond competently.

___

___

___

___

___

14. He/she valued the differences of opinion andperspectives. ___ 15. He/she can successfully facilitate a group without his/ her own issues or agendas getting in the way. ___ Questionnaire B. Cooperative Leadership Directions: a. Read each item carefully.

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

b. Think about how frequently you engaged collaboration described by each item.

in

this

c. Decide whether you always, often, sometimes, occasionally, or never act as described by the item. d. Put a check ( ) on the space under each number corresponding your choice. 5 – Always 4 – Often 3 – Sometimes 2 – Occasionally 1 – Never 5 4 3 2 1

1. He/she does not control others for the purpose of demonstrating power; or act in a stubborn manner. ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ 2. He/she promotes the attitude for treating others as equals. ___

___

___

___

___

59 3. He/she tries to control others with the use of personal criticism. 4. He/she works toward helping others do better. 5. He/she does not manipulate others or maneuver others for self-serving advantage. 6. He/she guides others toward creating mutualwork benefit.

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___ ___

___ ___

___ ___

___ ___

___ ___

5 7. He/she does not resist cooperation orintentionally works against others. ___ 8. He/she seek out ways to affirm others. 9. He/she does not become quick to retaliate inmoody and crabby ways.

4

3

2

1

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

10. He/she understands the importance ofencouraging others. ___ ___ ___ ___ 11. He/she can effectively get input from everyone “at the table”. ___ 12. He/she can tap the expertise of others and utilizethem in effective and appropriate ways. ___ 13. He/she listens carefully to the views of others. ___ ___ 14. He/she can separate people and personalitiesfrom the problems.___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___ ___

___

___

___

___

60 15. He/she can adapt to changing demands. ___ ___ ___

___

___

Questionnaire C.Connected Leadership Directions: a. Read each item carefully. b. Think about how frequently you engaged in this collaboration described by each item. c. Decide whether you always, often, sometimes, occasionally, or never act as described by the item. d. Put a check ( ) on the space under each number corresponding your choice. 5 – Always 4 – Often 3 – Sometimes 2 – Occasionally 1 – Never 5 1. He/she does not seem indifferent to task related activities. ___ 2. He/she express positive energy toward task related activities. ___ 4 3 ___ 2 1 ___ ___

___

___

___

___

___

3. He/she does not act as if cannot relate to others orseems insensitive to others. ___ 4. He/she initiate efforts in response to others. 5. He/she does not avoid using energy for ordinary work activity.

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

61 6. He/she responds constructively and initiate action toward the tasks. ___ 7. He/she is not hesitant to express thoughts and ideas or remain inexpressive. 8. He/she assertively expresses ideas and thoughts. ___ 9. He/she does not avoid interacting with others and become disconnected with others.
10.

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___ ___ ___ ___ 5 4 3 2 1 ___ ___ ___ ___

He/she is friendly and initiate friendly interactions with others.

___

11. He/she can make concessions in his/her own viewpoints to achieve results for the greater whole or cause. ___ 12. He/she is comfortable and successful working with different belief, gender, age and religion. ___ ___ ___ ___ 13. He/she can connect actions to larger goals. 14. He/she is resilient when confronted or attacked verbally.

___

___

___ ___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

___

15. He/she can effectively confront difficultinterpersonal issues. ___

___

___

___

___

62

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