Understanding Finance Sector in India

Published on December 2016 | Categories: Documents | Downloads: 30 | Comments: 0 | Views: 150
of 81
Download PDF   Embed   Report

Dr. Prashant Desai, Assistant Professor, National Law School of India University (NLSIU)Part of course material of Banking Law at NLSIU

Comments

Content

Understanding Finance Sector in 
India
Dr. Prashant S. Desai
Assistant Professor in Law,
National Law School of India University, 
Bangalore‐560 072.

Module contents
• Understanding the architecture of finance 
sector in India
• Brief background of ‘regulation’ pertaining to 
finance sector in India
• Flagging‐up of few ‘challenges’ and ‘grey 
areas’ of finance sector
• Contextualizing the future discourse

What is finance sector?
• Interestingly the term ‘finance sector’ is 
not ‘technically’ or ‘legally’ defined
• There are few explanations 

OECD’s explanation 
• “financial sector is the set of institutions, 
instruments and the regulatory 
framework that permit transactions to be 
made by incurring and settling debts; 
that is by extending credit” 

Another explanation
• “the term ‘financial system’, implied a set of 
complex and closely connected or interlinked 
institutions, agents, practices, markets, 
transactions, claims and liabilities in the 
economy.  The financial system is concerned 
about money, credit and finance – the three 
terms are intimately related yet are somewhat 
different from each other”

Yet another explanation 
• “financial institutions are business 
organizations that act as mobilizers and 
depositories of savings and as purveyors 
of credit or finance.  They also provide 
various financial services to the 
community”

Few more observations
• The financial institutions differ from non‐
financial (industrial and commercial) business 
organizations in respect of their dealings;
• While the former deal in financial assets such 
as deposits loans securities and so on
• The latter deal in equipment, stocks of goods, 
real estate etc.,

Indian finance sector 











Banking institutions
Non Banking Finance Companies
Investment/Merchant banks 
Mutual Funds
Insurance Companies
Factoring and Factoring Companies
Venture Capital Companies 
Housing Finance Companies
Portfolio Managers
Micro Finance Companies 

Banking institutions
• The institutions doing ‘banking’ business
– Acceptance of deposits and extension of credit 
facilities 
– Recognized as banking companies by the relevant 
law (i.e., either their respective dedicated statute 
or The Banking Regulation Act, 1949)

• Roughly the Indian Banks can be classified as
– Scheduled and 
– Non‐Scheduled banks

Non‐banking finance companies 
• Popularly known as NBFCs
• These are regulated by RBI and allowed 
to raise deposits from the public
• They offer financial services such leasing, 
hire purchasing, vehicle financing etc.,

• NBFC is a company registered under the 
Companies Act, 1956, engaged in the business 
of loans and advances, acquisition of shares, 
stock, bond,  hire‐purchase, insurance 
business, or chit business: but does not 
include any institution whose principal 
business is that of agriculture activity, 
industrial activity, sale/purchase/construction 
of immovable property.

• As per the RBI Act, a 'non‐banking financial 
company' is defined as:‐
(i)a financial institution which is a company; 
(ii)a non banking institution which is a company and 
which has as its principal business the receiving of 
deposits, under any scheme or arrangement or in 
any other manner, or lending in any manner; 
(iii)such other non‐banking institution or class of 
such institutions, as the bank may, with the 
previous approval of the Central Government and 
by notification in the Official Gazette, specify.

• For regulatory purposes, NBFCs have been 
classified into 3 categories:
a) Those accepting public deposits,
b) Those not accepting public deposits but 
engaged in financial business and 
c) Core investment companies with 90% of their 
total assets as investments in the securities 
of their group/ holding/ subsidiary 
companies.

• Depending upon the nature and type of service 
provided, they are categorized into:
 Asset finance companies
 Housing finance companies
 Venture capital funds
 Merchant banking organizations
 Credit rating agencies
 Factoring and forfaiting organizations
 Housing finance companies
 Stock brokering firms
 Depositories

• “Notwithstanding their diversity, NBFCs are characterised 
by their ability to provide niche financial services in the 
Indian economy. Because of their relative organisational 
flexibility leading to a better response mechanism, they 
are often able to provide tailor‐made services relatively 
faster than banks and financial institutions. This enables 
them to build up a clientele that ranges from small 
borrowers to establish corporate. While NBFCs have 
often been leaders in financial innovations, which are 
capable of enhancing the functional efficiency of the 
financial system, instances of unsustainability, often on 
account of high rates of interest on their deposits and 
periodic bankruptcies, underscore the need for 
reinforcing their financial viability.”
‐ Report on trends on progress of banking in India 2002‐03

Investment banks 
• Cater to the long term investment requirements 
of the markets
• Generally participate in equity capital of the 
company or extension of long term capital 
• A financial intermediary that performs a variety 
of services. This includes underwriting, acting as 
an intermediary between an issuer of securities 
and the investing public, facilitating mergers 
and other corporate reorganizations, and also 
acting as a broker for institutional clients.

Mutual funds
• A mutual fund is a company that pools money 
from many investors and invests in well 
diversified portfolio of sound investment.
• issues securities (units) to the investors (unit 
holders) in accordance with the quantum of 
money invested by them.
• profit shared by the investors in proportion to 
their investments.

• set up in the form of trust and has a sponsor, 
trustee, asset management company and 
custodian
• advantages in terms of convenience, lower risk, 
expert management and reduced transaction 
cost.
• Very critical in today’s financial services market
• The funds are invested in various instruments 
and managed by the Asset Management 
Companies, which act as Investment Manager 
of the Mutual Fund

• They give small investors access to professionally 
managed, diversified portfolios of equities, bonds 
and other securities, which would be quite 
difficult to create with a small amount of capital.
• Each shareholder participates proportionally in 
the gain or loss of the fund.
• Mutual Fund Regulations, 1996 of Securities 
Exchange Board of India
• Mutual Fund is also registered as Trust under the 
Indian Trust Act, 1882

Mutual Fund Operation Flow Chart

Insurance companies
• Commenced playing a dominant role in the 
financial markets especially after privatization
• Competition in the insurance sector has 
created many attractive insurance products of 
different nature to investors at affordable 
rates
• Regulated by Insurance Regulator Authority of 
India

Factoring Companies
• Involves the sale of receivables by a company 
to a financial intermediary who will undertake 
the activity of maintenance of accounts, 
collection of debts and financing against 
receivables
• Not very much picked up in India as of now
– Insufficient credit information, 
– Lack of data to evaluate the debtors and 
– Clear assessment of risks factors 
– Absence of clear statute to support the activity 

Venture capital
• Is the extension of capital assistance or 
participation by a company or high net worth 
investor to assist a start up and untested 
project
• This is to encourage upcoming entrepreneurs 
to take up new business initiatives
• Venture Capitalists are regulated by SEBI 
under the Venture Capital Regulations 

1.The institutions such as IDBI played a key role as 
Venture Capitalists in the country.
2.However, with the introduction of Cess of Five 
Percent on technology import payments, in the 
budget of 1987‐88, the Government of India 
created a pool of funds to assist the venture 
capital undertakings.
3.Today the country has venture capital funds 
owned by the banks, development Finance 
Companies and Private Sector companies owned 
by high net worth individuals.  
4.Today the majority of the start up projects are 
financed by the private sector companies. 

Housing finance companies
• Provide funding to the construction or 
purchase of houses by individuals, companies 
etc.,
• Establishment of Housing & Urban 
Development Corporation (1970)
• National Housing Bank (as subsidiary of RBI)
• Housing Development Finance Company

• The National Housing Bank has been set up as an 
apex institution  under the National Housing Bank 
Act, 1987 on July 9, 1988. 
• The objective of the Bank is to operate as a 
principal agency to promote housing finance 
institutions both at local and regional levels and 
to provide financial and other support to such 
institutions.
• The GoI has adopted a comprehensive National 
Housing Policy which envisages development of a 
viable and accessible institutional system for the 
provision of housing finance. The Banks have set 
up specialized housing finance institutions. 

Portfolio managers
• Financial service (either by stock broker or 
NBFC) to invest on behalf of investors in 
shares and stocks 
• Especially where – investors do not directly 
want to invest but are interested in high 
returns from the stock markets
• Portfolio Management services are regulated 
under SEBI (Portfolio) Management 
Regulations

Micro finance companies
• Microfinance is the provision of financial services 
to low‐income clients or solidarity lending groups 
including consumers and the self‐employed, who 
traditionally lack access to banking and related 
services.”
– Provide self financial assistance to the poor 
women in rural areas for the development of 
tiny or small industrial growth

• In India it has grown multifold in recent years 
• These companies avail credit facilities from 
the bank to extend these loan facilities
• Till recently there was no ceiling of loan by 
these companies nor these companies were 
regulated.
• However, it is proposed to bring a separate 
legislation to regulate these companies and 
also proposes to cap the ceiling of lending by 
these companies.  

The regulatory environment

• Points for Discussion
• Principles related to Regulators
• Why regulate finance sector?
• The fundamental underpinning of policies
a) Protection of investors
b) Ensuring that markets are clear, efficient & 
transparent
c) Reduction of systemic risk
• The new emerging challenge

• Salient features
• Regulatory principles
• Various Regulatory Bodies
• Financial Sector Legislative Reforms Commission
• Analysis of Financial Sector Reforms
a) Reforms in Banking Sector
b) Reforms in the Government Securities Market
c) Reforms in the Foreign Exchange Market

• Regulation refers to controlling human or societal 
behavior by rules or regulations or alternatively a 
rule or order issued by an executive authority or 
regulatory agency of a government and having 
the force of law.
• Financial regulation deals with directing the 
financial institutions like banks, insurance 
companies, mortgage loan companies, etc.to 
fulfill certain requirements, imposing certain 
restrictions and setting out guidelines so as to 
keep up the integrity of the entire financial 
system.

Principles related to Regulators
• The regulators should have clearly & objectively 
stated responsibilities; 
• they should have operational independence & 
accountability in the exercise of its powers & 
functions; 
• they should adopt clear & consistent regulatory 
processes; 
• they should observe the highest professional 
standards including appropriate standards of 
confidentiality.

Why regulate finance sector?
• Obvious answer…
– That every human conduct has to be regulated 
from the societal point of view

• Specific answer…
– Regulation to encompass all activities/institution 
of finance sector in order to ensure equity in their 
conduct, so that end users are given a fair deal 
and any unscrupulous players dealt with firm hand 

The fundamental underpinning of 
policies
1. the economic stability
a. Reduction of ‘systemic risks’
b. Maintenance of ‘customer confidence’ (by prevention 
of market abuse and fraudulent activities) 

2. Necessary support for overall equitable 
economic development 
3. Investor interest protection
4. Of course … the better protection of the 
financial sector operators themselves

Protection of investors
• Investors are required to be protected from being 
mislead or manipulated from fraudulent practices 
including insider trading and misuse of client 
assets. 
• It is the task of the regulator to set minimum 
standard for market participants in order to 
achieve a level of investor protection. 
• The market intermediaries should be able to refer 
to rules of business conduct that ensure that 
investors will be treated in a just and equitable 
manner.

Ensuring that markets are clear, 
efficient & transparent
• It is the task of the regulator to ensure that 
there are regulations for the protection of the 
investor and to ensure fairness while at the 
same time ensuring that there is efficient and 
transparent dissemination of information.

Reduction of systemic risk
• No amount of regulation or oversight can 
guarantee against the possibility of financial 
failure of a market intermediary. 
• However, regulation can and should aim to 
reduce the risk of failure. Where such failure 
does occur, it is the role of the regulator to 
seek to reduce the impact of that failure and 
to attempt to isolate the risk solely to the 
failing institution. 

The new emerging challenge
• Globalizing trend (reduction of 
geographical boundaries) has further 
added to the complexity of the 
regulation of financial sector 

Salient features
• The counter trend (compared to generic trend 
of liberalization) from lesser to more 
‘stringent’ regulation
• Emerging global consciousness
• Broad ‘sustentative’ legislation: and plethora 
of ‘subordinate’ legislation    

Regulatory principles
RULE BASED 
REGULATION

Less discretionary & regulator is 
guided by the ‘letter of law’

PRINCIPLE 
BASED 
REGULATION

Greater latitude to the market 
players – fosters a culture of mutual 
trust and faith in the regulator, 

DISCRETION 
BASED 
REGULATION

More discretion with the regulator 
making him more powerful 

CENTRAL 
GOVERNMENT

SEBI

IRDA

INSURANCE 
COMPANIES

STOCK 
EXCHANGE

MERCHANT 
BANKERS

PORTFOLIO 
MANGERS

MUTUAL FUNDS

FACTORING

PAYMENT 
SYSTEMS

BANKS

NBFCS

CO‐OPERATIVE 
BANKS

PRIMARY 
DEALERS

RBI

FMC

COMMODITY 
EXCHANGES 

PENSION 
REGULATORY 
AUTHORITY
PENSION 
FUNDS/ 
COMPANIES 

Various Regulatory Bodies
• RBI – it is the central banking regulatory that 
governs the monetary policy of the Indian Rupee. 
• The Regulation & supervision of banks are key 
elements of a financial safety net as banks are 
often found at the center of systemic financial 
crisis. 
• The Reserve Bank regulates & supervises the 
major part of the financial system. The 
supervisory role of the Reserve Bank covers 
commercial banks, urban cooperative banks, 
some FIs & NBFCs. 

• Some of the FIs, in turn, regulates and/or supervise 
other institutions in the financial sector, viz., RRB & 
central and state cooperative banks are supervised 
by NABARD, and housing finance companies by 
National Housing Bank (NHB).
• Its objectives are to maintain public confidence in 
the system, protect depositor’s interest and provide 
cost‐effective banking services to the public.
• The Banking Ombudsman Scheme has been 
formulated by the RBI for effective addressing of 
complaints by bank customers. 

• The RBI controls the monetary supply, monitors 
economic indicators like the gross domestic 
product and has to decide the design of the 
rupee banknotes as well as coins. In accordance 
with provisions of the RBI Act, 1934 its main 
functions are:
i. Operating monetary policy with the aim of 
maintaining economic and financial stability and 
ensuring adequate financial resources for 
development purposes;
ii. Meeting the currency requirement of the 
public;
iii. Promotion of an efficient financial system;

iv. Foreign exchange reserve management;
v. The conduct of banking and financial 
operations of the government.
• “To regulate the issue of Bank Notes and 
keeping of reserves with a view to securing 
monetary stability in India and generally to 
operate the currency and credit system of the 
country to its advantage.”

• SEBI – it is a statutory body that governs the 
securities market of India with a view of 
protecting the interest of investors.
• This body lays down regulations in order to 
ensure orderly growth and smooth 
functioning of the Indian Capital market.
• The overall objectives of SEBI are to protect 
the interest of investors and to promote the 
development of stock exchanges and to 
regulate the activities of stock market.

Protective Functions of SEBI
• This function is performed by SEBI to protect 
the interest of investor and provide safety of 
investment.
• SEBI checks price rigging, prohibits insider 
trading, prohibits fraudulent and unfair trade 
practices in which it does not allow the 
companies to make misleading statements 
which are likely to induce the sale and 
purchase of securities by any other person.

Developmental Functions of SEBI
• These functions are performed by SEBI to 
promote and develop activities in stock 
exchange and increase the business in stock 
exchange.
• SEBI promotes training of intermediaries of 
the securities market, tries to promote 
activities of the stock exchange by adopting 
flexible and adoptable approach.

Regulatory Functions of SEBI
• It has framed rules & regulations and a code of 
conduct to regulate the intermediaries such as 
merchant bankers, brokers, under writers, etc.
• It registers and regulates the working of stock 
brokers, sub brokers, share transfer agents, and 
all those who are associated with stock exchange 
in any manner.
• It registers and regulates the working of mutual 
funds etc.
• It regulates takeover of companies.
• It conducts inquiries and audit of stock exchanges

Forward Markets Commission (FMC)
• It is the chief regulator of forwards and futures market 
in India.
• It is a statutory body set up under the Forward 
Contracts (Regulation) Act, 1952 
• It regulates the commodity derivative markets and 
brokers.
• It provides regulatory oversight in order to ensure 
financial integrity (i.e. to prevent systemic risk of 
default by one major operator or group of operators), 
market integrity (i.e. to ensure that future prices are 
truly aligned with the prospective demand and supply 
conditions) and to protect & promote interests of 
consumers/ non‐members.

• The forward market commission performs the 
role of a market regulator. After assessing the 
market situation and taking into account the 
recommendations made by the  Board of 
Directors of the Commodity Exchange, the 
Commission approves the rules and 
regulations of the Exchange in accordance 
with which trading is to be conducted.

Insurance Regulatory and Development 
Authority
• It is an autonomous apex statutory body which 
regulates and develops the insurance industry in India.
• It is responsible to protect the rights of policyholders. 
• Its role and responsibilities involves providing 
certificate of registration to a life insurance company, 
to frame regulations on protection of policyholder’s 
interests, specifying the requisite qualifications, code 
of conduct and practical training for intermediaries or 
insurance intermediaries and agents.
• It also aims to promote and regulate activities of 
professional organizations connected with life 
insurance, to adjudicate disputes between insurers and 
intermediaries or insurance intermediaries etc.

Pension fund Regulatory and Development 
Authority
• PFRDA‐ it is an agency which promotes old age 
income security by regulating and developing 
pension funds.
• The National Pension System Trust is composed 
of members representing diverse fields and 
brings wide range of talent to the regulatory 
framework. 
• It also intends to intensify its effort towards 
financial education and awareness as a part of its 
strategy to protect the interest of the subscribers.

• Ministry of Finance – it is concerned with 
taxation, union budgets, capital markets and 
finances for the Centre and State.
• High Level Coordination Committee – it 
maintains coordination between the 
regulators.

Financial Sector Legislative Reforms 
Commission
• The Union Ministry of Finance constituted the FSLRC in 
March 2011, with a mandate to review and suggest 
changes to existing laws & regulatory institutions in the 
financial sector to bring them up to speed with globally 
prevalent standards.
• Two years later, a report was released which advocated 
a comprehensive overhaul of the existing regulatory 
framework, including the replacement of a substantial 
body of existing laws with the Indian Financial Code 
drafted by FSLRC. 
• FSLRC has its responsibility of reviewing, simplifying 
and modernizing the legislations affecting the financial 
markets.

• FSLRC has endorsed a transition to a more 
scientific regulatory architecture recommended 
by government reports such as Raghuram Rajan
Committee report and Percy Mistry Committee 
report.
• The lesson learnt from the global economic 
downturn pressed FSLRC to propose a new 
regulatory framework.
• The three elements in FSLRC approach are:‐
1. Modes of independence
2. Accountability
3. Rule making process of regulators.

• The regulatory objectives should be clearly defined.
• The regulator should be empowered with respective 
instruments that do not prevent innovation.
• At times the regulator might have to choose between 
innovation and reducing risk, but eliminating risk 
altogether is not a good option as it will restrict finance 
from reaching out to new customers, products and 
markets, thus restricting the power of the regulator.
• With a vision to protect public interest FSLRC 
emphasizes on governance of regulation. Regulators 
will be independent but should be accountable. It 
discourages the idea of bringing too many innovations 
in the financial system and echoes to keep it simple but 
powerful.

• The FSLRC has suggested the creation of the 
Unified Financial Agency (UFA), a new body which 
would be entrusted with micro‐prudential 
regulation and consumer protection for all 
financial sectors other than banking and payment 
systems.
• This body would subsume the existing regulators 
for capital markets (SEBI), forward markets 
(Forward Market Commission), insurance (IRDA) 
and pension (Pension Fund Regulatory and 
Development Authority).

• RBI would continue in the new setup as the 
regulator for banking and payment systems 
and frame monetary policy.
• RBI would also be responsible for capital 
outflows from the country, a change from the 
present model where the RBI makes rules for 
capital account transactions in consultation 
with the government and vice‐versa for 
current account transactions.

• The FSLRC also envisages the creation of the 
Public Debt Management Agency (PDMA), an 
independent body which will take over the task of 
handling governmental market borrowings from 
the RBI, and will additionally manage the cash 
and contingent liabilities of the government.
• The Financial Stability and Development Council, 
which currently comprises various sectoral 
regulators and officials of the Ministry of Finance, 
will be granted the status of a statutory body & 
will be responsible for managing systemic risks 
and coordinating between different regulatory 
agencies.

• The FSLRC has suggested the creation of a 
Resolution Corporation in place of the Deposit 
Insurance and Credit Guarantee Corporation 
to assist in the speedy resolution and closure 
of all systematically important financial 
institutions or those having strong linkages to 
consumers such as banks, insurance 
companies or pension funds.

• Financial Redressal Agency (FRA) would be 
operating as a consumer grievance redressal
mechanism across the financial sector. 
• Appeals from the FRA and decisions in respect of 
certain functions of the UFA, the RBI and the 
Resolution Corporation, will be heard by the 
Financial Sector Appellate Tribunal (FSAT), within 
which the Securities Appellate Tribunal will be 
subsumed.
• Additionally, the FSAT will be empowered to 
review regulations on grounds like procedural 
defects, the regulator exceeding its mandate, or 
the regulations being in violation of the Code.

Analysis of Financial Sector Reforms
• Remove financial repression that existed 
earlier;
• Create an efficient, productive and profitable 
financial sector industry;
• Enable price discovery, particularly, by the 
market determination of interest rates that 
then helps efficient allocation of resources;
• Provide operational and functional autonomy 
to institutions;

• Prepare the financial system for increasing 
international competition;
• Open the external sector in a calibrated fashion;
• Promote the maintenance of financial stability 
even in the face of domestic and external shocks.
• The main aim of the reforms in the early phase of 
reforms, known as first generation of reforms, 
was to create an efficient, productive and 
profitable financial service industry operating 
within the environment of operating flexibility 
and functional  autonomy.

Panchasutra or five principles
• Cautious and appropriate sequencing of 
reform measures.
• Introduction of norms that are mutually 
reinforcing.
• Introduction of complementary reforms across 
sectors.
• Development of financial institutions.
• Development of financial markets.

Reforms in Banking Sector
• Prudential Measures
1) Introduction & phased implementation of 
international best practices and norms on risk‐
weighted capital adequacy requirement, accounting, 
income recognition, provisioning and exposure.
2) Measures to strengthen risk management through 
recognition of different components of risk, 
assignment of risk‐weights to various asset classes, 
norms on connected  lending, risk concentration, 
application of market‐to‐market principle for 
investment portfolio & limits on deployment of fund 
in sensitive activities.

• Competition Enhancing Measures
1) Granting of operational autonomy to public 
sector banks, reduction of public ownership in 
public sector banks by allowing them to raise 
capital from equity market up to 49% of paid‐up 
capital.
2) Transparent norms for entry of Indian Private 
sector, foreign & joint‐venture banks & 
insurance companies, permission for foreign 
investment in the financial sector in the form of 
FDI as well as portfolio investment, permission 
to banks to diversify product portfolio & 
business activities.

• Measures Enhancing Role of Market Forces
1) Sharp reduction of pre‐emption through reserve 
requirement, market determined pricing for 
government securities, disbanding of 
administered interest rates with a few 
exceptions & enhanced transparency & 
disclosure norms to facilitate market discipline.
2) Introduction of pure inter‐bank call money 
market, auction‐based repos‐reverse repos for 
short‐term liquidity management, facilitation of 
improved payments and settlement mechanism.

• Institutional & Legal measures
1) Setting up of Lok Adalats, DRTs, ARCs, Settlement 
advisory committees, corporate debt restructuring 
mechanism, etc. for quicker recovery/restructuring. 
Promulgation of SARFAESI Act & its subsequent 
amendment to ensure creditor rights.
2) Setting up of Credit Information Bureau for 
information sharing on defaulters as also other 
borrowers.
3) Setting up of Clearing Corporation of India Ltd. (CCIL) 
to act as central counter party for facilitating 
payments & settlement system relating to fixed 
income securities & money market instruments.

• Supervisory Measures
1) Establishment of the Board for Financial 
Supervision as the apex supervisory authority 
for commercial banks, financial institutions and 
NBFCs.
2) Introduction of CAMELS ( Capital Adequacy, 
Assets, Management Capability, Earnings, 
Liquidity, Sensitivity) supervisory rating system, 
move towards risk‐based supervision, 
consolidated supervision of financial 
conglomerates, strengthening of off‐site 
surveillance through control returns.
3) Recasting of the role of statutory auditors, 
increased internal control through strengthening 
of internal audit.

• Strengthening corporate governance, enhanced 
due diligence on important shareholders, fit and 
proper tests for directors.
• Technology Related Measures
• Setting up of INFINET as the communication 
backbone for the financial sector, introduction of 
Negotiated Dealing System (NDS) for screen‐
based trading in government securities and Real 
Time Settlement (RTGS) System.

Reforms in the Government Securities 
Market
• Institutional Measures
• Administered interest rates on govt. securities 
were replaced by an auction system for price 
discovery.
• Automatic monetization of fiscal deficit trough 
the issue of ad hoc Treasury Bills was phased 
out.
• Primary Dealers were introduced as market 
makers in the government securities market.

• For ensuring transparency in the trading of govt. 
securities, Delivery versus Payment settlement system 
was introduced.
• Repurchase agreement (repo) was introduced as a tool 
of short‐term liquidity adjustment. Subsequently, the 
Liquidity Adjustment Facility (LAF) was introduced. LAF 
operates through repo and reverse repo auctions to set 
up a corridor for short‐term interest rate. LAF has 
emerged as the tool for both liquidity management 
and also signaling device for interest rates in the 
overnight market.
• Market Stabilization Scheme (MSS) has been 
introduced, which has expanded the instruments 
available to the Reserve Bank for managing the surplus 
liquidity in the system.

• Enabling Measures
• Foreign Institutional Investors (FIIs) were allowed to 
invest in government securities subject to certain 
limits.
• Introduction of automated screen‐based trading in 
government securities through Negotiated Dealing 
System(NDS). Setting up of risk‐free payments and 
settlement system in govt. securities through Clearing 
Corporation of India Ltd (CCIL). Phased introduction of 
Real Time Gross Settlement System (RTGS).
• Introduction of trading of government securities on 
stock exchanges for promoting retailing in such 
securities, permitting non‐banks to participate in repo 
market.

Reforms in the Foreign Exchange 
Market
• Exchange Rate Regime
• Evolution of exchange rate regime from a single‐
currency fixed‐exchange rate system to fixing the value 
of rupee against a basket of currencies & further to 
market‐determined floating exchange rate regime.
• Adoption of convertibility of rupee for current account 
transactions with acceptance of Article VIII of the 
Articles of Agreement of the IMF. De facto full capital 
account convertibility for non residents and calibrated 
liberalization of transactions undertaken for capital 
account purposes in the case of residents.

• Institutional Framework
• Replacement of the earlier FERA, 1973 by the 
market friendly FEMA, 1999. delegation of 
considerable powers by RBI to Authorized 
Dealers to release foreign exchange for a 
variety of purposes.

• Increase in Instruments in the Foreign Exchange 
Market
• Development of rupee‐foreign currency swap 
market.
• Introduction of additional hedging instruments, 
such as, foreign currency‐rupee options. 
Authorized dealers permitted to use innovative 
products like cross‐currency options, interest rate 
and currency swaps, caps/collars and forward 
rate agreements (FRAs) in the international forex
market.

• Liberalization Measures
• Authorized dealers permitted to initiate trading 
positions, borrow and invest in overseas market 
subject to certain specifications and ratification 
by respective Banks’ Boards. Banks are also 
permitted to fix interest rates on non‐resident 
deposits, subject to certain specifications, use 
derivative products for asset‐liability 
management and fix overnight open position 
limits and gap limits in the foreign exchange 
market, subject to ratification by RBI.

• Permission to various participants in the foreign 
exchange market, including exporters, Indians 
investing abroad, Foreign Institutional Investors 
(FIIs), to avail forward cover and enter into swap 
transactions without any limit subject to genuine 
underlying exposure.
• FIIs and NRIs permitted to trade in exchange‐
traded derivative contracts subject to certain 
conditions.
• Foreign exchange earners permitted to maintain 
foreign currency accounts. Residents are 
permitted to open such accounts within the 
general limit of US $ 25,000 per year. 

Sponsor Documents

Or use your account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Forgot your password?

Or register your new account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Lost your password? Please enter your email address. You will receive a link to create a new password.

Back to log-in

Close