UT Dallas Syllabus for husl7333.501 06s taught by John Barber (jfb010100)

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HUSL 7333 Special Topics in Rhetoric (Academic and Scholarly Writing) Spring 2006, W, 5:30-6:45pm, JO4.124 NOTE: All matters associated with this course are subject to change at the instructor's discretion. Any changes will be communicated to students. Course Professor Dr. John F. Barber Office JO 4.128 Telephone 972-883-2038 Email Office Hours [email protected] MW 12-5 PM

Course Description A writing seminar focused on various types of academic and scholarly writing expected in the broadly defined field of Arts and Humanities. Prepares graduate students to better engage in the larger discourse (textual and oral) of ideas related to their research foci. Required reading and writing assignments, as well as presentations. Students may also participate in writing online (email, blogs, etc.) for collaboration and research. Students are required • To submit a proposal to a professional conference designated by the instructor • If accepted, to attend and deliver a professional presentation at that conference • To write and submit a research article to a professional journal for publication Course Rationale Typically, graduate programs train students to think and analyze, but not to participate in a larger professional discourse through written articles or professional conference presentations. This lack of preparation makes the transition to university faculty member more difficult. This course aims to address the need for training in the areas of professional academic and scholarly writing. Course Structure Engaged seminar workshops and discussions and substantial writing assignments. Students will participate in collaborative writing groups where they share and critique their writing. Writing assignments will include • A conference proposal for The South Central Modern Language Association Convention, (SCMLA), 26-28 October 2006, Fort Worth, TX • A conference presentation for SCMLA • A publishable research article • An academic book review (as part of conference presentation or article) • An academic biography • An academic curriculum vita • Writing in online environments (blogs, hypertext/web genres, etc.) Texts and Additional Resources Academic Writing for Graduate Students: Essential Tasks and Skills John M. Swales and Christine B. Feak University of Michigan Press 2004 English in Today's Research World: A Writing Guide John M. Swales and Christine B. Feak University of Michigan Press 2000 Proposals and Annotated Bibliographies Heather Avery and Paul Gamache The Academic Skills Centre at Trent University

Writing Academic Reviews Karen Taylor The Academic Skills Centre at Trent University Effective Seminar Presentations Martin Boyne, Karen Taylor, and Paul Gamache The Academmic Skills Centre at Trent University The Essentials of College and University Writing Robert Blake Truscott Research and Education Association MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing Current Edition Joseph Gibaldi Modern Language Association Grading Final grades are determined by quality of work demonstrated for each assignment and the instructor's evaluation of your participation in these and other course activities. Lack of attendance and participation will lower your final grade. All writing for this course will be produced solely for this course and not for other courses, nor should any writing submitted for this course come from the work of other courses. Incomplete grades will not be granted. All required course work must be completed as and when required in order to pass this course. Late or incomplete work will lower your grade, or will not be accepted. "+" and "-" grades will be used at the instructor's discretion and only in special situations. Otherwise, all final grades will be "A-F." The instructor is the final authority in all matters related to grades. Academic Dishonesty Discovery of any form of academic dishonesty (cheating, plagiarism, collusion, etc.) will result in a failing grade as well as possible further sanctions from standing University policies. Disability Accommodations Students needing academic accommodations for a disability must contact Ms. Kerry Tate, Coordinator, Disability Services (972-883-2098), to verify the disability and establish eligibility for accommodations. Students with disabilities are responsible to make their disabilities known and to meet all course expectations, including attendance, participation, performance, and work standards. Personal Communication Device Policy Turn off all cell phones, pagers, and other personal communication devices before the start of class. Their sounding/signaling and/or use during class will result in your banishment.

HUSL 7333 Special Topics in Rhetoric (Academic and Scholarly Writing) Spring 2006, W, 5:30-6:45pm, JO4.124 NOTE: All matters associated with this course are subject to change at the instructor's discretion. Any changes will be communicated to students. Week 1—First Class Meeting 1. Mon. Jan. 9, 2006 • Course introduction, discussion of requirements and expectations 2. Wed. Jan. 11, 2006 • Discussion of "excellent writing"; bring a sample, discuss why it is excellent Week 2—Introduction 3. Mon. Jan. 16—University Holiday. NO CLASS! 4. Wed. Jan. 18, 2006 • Curriculum Vita, Introduction and Overview Week 3—Curriculum Vita 5. Mon. Jan. 23, 2006 • Curriculum Vita workshops 6. Wed. Jan. 25, 2006 • Curriculum Vita draft; workshops and peer review Week 4—Academic Biography 7. Mon. Jan. 30, 2006 • Curriculum Vita due • Introduce Academic Biography 8. Wed. Feb. 1, 2006 • Academic biography draft; workshops and peer review • Introduce Academic Conference Proposal Week 5—Conference Proposal 9. Mon. Feb. 6, 2006 • Academic Biography due • Academic Conference Proposal, Introduction and Overview 10. Wed. Feb. 8, 2006 • Academic Conference Proposal, workshops Week 6—Book Review 11. Mon. Feb. 13, 2006 • Book Review, Introduction and Overview • Academic Conference Proposal Workshop, workshops 12. Wed. Feb. 15, 2006 • Conference Presentations, Introduction and Overview Week 7— 13. Mon. Feb. 20, 2006 • Proposal, Presentation, Review, workshops as necessary 14. Wed. Feb. 22, 2006 • Critique instructor's upcoming conference presentation

Week 8— 15. Mon. Feb. 27, 2006 • Academic Conference Proposal presentations—final version; Deliver and critique 16. Wed. Mar. 1, 2006 • Academic Conference Proposal presentations—final version; Deliver and critique • Book Review due SPRING BREAK, MONDAY MARCH 6 and WEDNESDAY MARCH 8, 2005 NO CLASS! Week 9— 17. Mon. Mar. 13, 2006 • Conference Presentations, Tips for success 18. Wed. Mar. 15, 2006 • Proposals must be submitted to SCMLA by this date • Academic Conference Proposal due Week 10— 19. Mon. Mar. 20, 2006 • Conference Presentations; Deliver and critique 20. Wed. Mar. 22, 2006 • Conference Presentations; Deliver and critique Week 11— 21. Mon. Mar. 27, 2006 • Conference Presentations; Deliver and critique 22. Wed. Mar. 29, 2006 • Conference Presentations; Deliver and critique Week 12— 23. Mon. Apr. 3, 2006 • Conference Presentations; Deliver and critique 24. Wed. April 5, 2006 • Conference Presentations; Deliver and critique Week 13— 25. Mon. Apr. 10, 2006 • Conference Presentations; Deliver and critique 26. Wed. Apr. 12, 2006 • Conference Presentations; Deliver and critique Week 14— 27. Mon. Apr. 17, 2006 • Conference Presentations; Deliver and critique 28. Wed. Apr. 19, 2006 • Conference Presentations; Deliver and critique (?) • Research Essay due Week 15— 29. Mon. Apr. 24, 2006—Last Class! • Course evaluations

HUSL 7333 Special Topics in Rhetoric (Academic and Scholarly Writing) Spring 2006, W, 5:30-6:45pm, JO4.124 Major Writing Assignments—Descriptions Academic Curriculum Vita Your curriculum vita, or "CV," will be the primary document by which you present and promote yourself throughout the rest of your academic and scholarly career. For this assignment you will write your CV, making it current with your present experience, as well as anticipating your "future perfect" career trajectory. Academic Biography An academic biography is frequently required of individuals whose work is accepted for publication, as well as in support of applications for grants, scholarships, and jobs. For this assignment you will write your own academic biography, 200 words maximum. Book Review Essay Writing book reviews is one way of entering a larger, professional discourse community. It is also a way of solidifying your own research. For this assignment you will write a 4-5 page review essay of a scholarly book associated with the research for your conference presentation. Conference Proposal See 2006 Conference Call for Proposals: http://www.ou.edu/scmla/FWRegAll.htm Professional conferences are primary arenas for engaging in ongoing discussions of research and scholarly interest(s). For this assignment you will write a proposal for a presentation to be delivered the forthcoming South Central Modern Language Association (SCMLA) meeting (26-28 October 2006, Fort Worth). This proposal may be for an individual presentation or a panel presentation comprised of yourself and your colleagues in this class. Your proposal must meet all guidelines set forth in the conference call for proposals, be serious, and intended for inclusion on the conference program. Must be submitted by 15 March 2006. If selected, you must attend the conference and present your promised presentation. Conference Presentation See SCMLA information: http://www.ou.edu/scmla/ Based on your SCMLA conference proposal, write a 20-minute professional presentation in which you explore the topic(s) promised in your proposal, reach the promised conclusion(s), and provide some benefit for those attending your presentation. This will be the conference paper you will deliver at SCMLA (26-28 October 2006, Fort Worth, TX). You will also deliver this paper, in its final, polished form, in class, to your colleagues and/or others. Research Article Write a major expansion of your conference presentation, turning it into a publishable article for a professional journal, a Master's thesis or doctoral dissertation chapter, or critical essay accompanying a creative dissertation. The finished article may be in first draft form, but considering that it will be the third iteration of your Conference Proposal, it should be as polished as possible.

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