WC Sports 8p 040314

Published on January 2017 | Categories: Documents | Downloads: 36 | Comments: 0 | Views: 243
of 8
Download PDF   Embed   Report

Comments

Content


By Mike Dunn
GAYLORD – The St. Mary
girls basketball program
enjoyed another outstanding
season in 2013-14, including
an outright Ski Valley
Conference championship
and a lofty state ranking.
Senior guard Kari Borowiak,
the only area player to earn
first-team All-State honors
from the Michigan
Associated Press, added to
the laurels of her stellar four-
year prep career, finishing as
the second all-time scorer in
the storied history of the
Snowbird program. Coach
Dan Smith, in his second
year as the head coach of the
Snowbirds, guided his rela-
tively young team to 19 victo-
ries.
For their efforts, Borowiak
has been named the 2014
Top Choice Player of the Year
and Smith has been named
the Coach of the Year.
Borowiak joins Karl Jacob
(2012) as a representative of
St. Mary earning Player of the
Year recognition.
This is the third time in
four years that St. Mary has
produced the coach of the
year. Kevin Foster also
earned the award in 2011 and
2012.
Borowiak and fellow senior
Maddie Hamilla of Gaylord
are co-captains of the 2014
Dream Team, which features
four seniors and three soph-
omores. The roster also
includes seniors Brittany
Cherwinski of Johannesburg-
Lewiston and Jalen DeFlorio
of Mio along with super
sophomores Brandi Wagner
of Gaylord, Madison
Showerman of
Johannesburg-Lewiston and
Bekah Myler of St. Mary.
The second team also
includes several underclass-
men. Along with hardwork-
ing Petoskey senior Kati
Lewis, the second team ros-
ter features juniors Lexi
Szymoniak of Onaway, who
generated a double-double
in 18 of the Cardinals’ 22
games for coach Marty Mix
this season, Brooke Hancock
of Cheboygan, Sammie
Denno of Grayling and
Lauren Bell of Mackinaw City
in addition to long-armed
freshman center Eileene
Naniseni, who helped the
Lady Ironmen to achieve a
remarkable turnaround sea-
son.
Player of the Year
The 5-foot-6 Borowiak
averaged 19.2 points per
game for the Snowbirds
while helping them to repeat
as Ski Valley Conference
champs and post a sparkling
17-2 regular-season record.
In the postseason, the
Snowbirds won their first two
games to advance to the
Class D district finals against
THURSDAY, APRIL 3, 2014
Athlete of the Week
(989) 705-8284
www.MainStreetGaylord.com
236 We$% Mai!, Ga(l"#d
Real Estate One
Gaylord
would like to
congratulate the
Athlete of the Week
FOR WEEK OF MARCH 23-29
STERLING
McPHERSON
GAYLORD HIGH SCHOOL
The high-stepping,
strong-striding Blue
Devil senior distance
runner finished sec-
ond overall among all
D-2 runners in the
1600 meet at CMU on
March 26 in a time of
4:56.06.
TOP CHOICE ALL-AREA
GIRLS PLAYER OF THE YEAR
2008 4 A-$'%! H*/-!, J*$a))!-b/,#-L!1%-.*) a)
M!#a) M/,+$2, O)a1a2
2009 4 A-$'%! H*/-!, J*$a))!-b/,#-L!1%-.*)
2010 4 K!,b2 Ta((, P!.*-&!2
2011 4 K!,b2 Ta((, P!.*-&!2
2012 4 Ka,'% Jac*b, Ga2'*, S.. Ma,2
2013 4 K!'-!2 A)c!, P!.*-&!2 a)
Mac&!)3%! E1a,-, Ga2'*,
2014 4 Ka,% B*,*1%a&, Ga2'*, S.. Ma,2
GIRLS COACH OF THE YEAR
2008 4 H!a.$!, H/"", J*$a))!-b/,#-L!1%-.*)
2009 4 H!a.$!, H/"", J*$a))!-b/,#-L!1%-.*)
2010 4 H!a.$!, H/"", J*$a))!-b/,#-L!1%-.*)
2011 4 K!0%) F*-.!,, Ga2'*, S.. Ma,2
2012 4 K!0%) F*-.!,, Ga2'*, S.. Ma,2
2013 4 F,a)& Ha(%''a, Ga2'*,
2014 4 Da) S(%.$, Ga2'*, S.. Ma,2
S
SECTION B
CALL - (989) 732-8160 • FAX (888) 854-7441
OR EMAIL:
MIKE DUNN - [email protected]
ANDY SNEDDON - [email protected]
DENNIS MANSFIELD - [email protected]
SPORTS
Ga2'*, S.. Ma,2 c*ac$ Da) S(%.$ a) -!)%*, #/a, Ka,% B*,*1%a& a,!
c*ac$ a) +'a2!, *" 2!a, *) 2014 A''-A,!a .!a(. PHOTO BY DAVE BARAGREY
Continued on page 2
Top Choice Girls Basketball
Borowiak is Player of Year, Smith is
Coach of Year; Gaylord’s Hamilla is
Dream Team co-captain
Ka#i B"#"'iak,
Ga(l"#d S%. Ma#(
Maddie Hailla,
Ga(l"#d
B#a!di Wag!e#,
Ga(l"#d
Madi$"! Sh"'e#a!,
J"ha!!e$b&#g-Le'i$%"!
B#i%%a!( Che#'i!$ki,
J"ha!!e$b&#g-Le'i$%"!
Bekah M(le#,
Ga(l"#d S%. Ma#(
Jale! DeFl"#i",
Mi"
C"ach Da! Si%h,
Ga(l"#d S%. Ma#(
St. Mary player, coach honored
DREAM TEAM
Kari Borowiak (12), Gaylord St. Mary*
Maddie Hamilla (12), Gaylord*
Brandi Wagner (10), Gaylord
Madison Showerman (10), Johannesburg-
Lewiston
Brittany Cherwinski (12), Johannesburg-
Lewiston
Bekah Myler (10), Gaylord St. Mary
Jalen DeFlorio (12), Mio
*Captain
SECOND TEAM
Brooke Hancock (11), Cheboygan
Lexi Szymoniak (11), Onaway
Samantha Denno (11), Grayling
Kati Lewis (12), Petoskey
Eileene Naniseni (9), Mancelona
Lauren Bell (11), Mackinaw City
Lindsey Zaremba (11), Gaylord
HONORABLE MENTION:
Alanson – Leah Sierra
Alba – Sydney Hogerheide
Cheboygan – Bridget Blaskowski,
Macey Charboneau
Gaylord – Lauren Hintz
Gaylord St. Mary – Gabby Schultz,
Georgi Nowicki
Grayling – Cierra Prosser
Inland Lakes – Allison Furst
Johannesburg-Lewiston – Hailey Weaver
Mackinaw City – Brooke Yoder
Mancelona – Emily Nixon
Mio – Leslie Asman
Onaway – Erika Price
Pellston – Hanah Carter
Vanderbilt – Amanda Arlt
Wolverine – Courtney Whittaker
COACHING STAFF:
Dan Smith, Gaylord St. Mary;
Frank Hamilla, Gaylord;
Heather Huff, Johannesburg-Lewiston;
Ben Tarbutton, Mancelona
PLAYER OF THE YEAR: Kari Borowiak, Gaylord St. Mary COACH OF THE YEAR: Dan Smith, Gaylord St. Mary
TOP CHOICE 2014 GIRLS BASKETBALL
Bellaire. In the rubber match
between the two schools, it
was the talented and more
experienced Eagles who pre-
vailed, ending St. Mary’s
record with a 19-3 mark.
Borowiak finished her
four-year prep career with an
eye-popping 1,446 points but
she was far more than just a
scorer for the Snowbirds. She
was also an excellent ball
handler and a tenacious
defender for coach Smith as
well as a strong rebounder. In
her senior season, she aver-
aged 5 steals and 4.8 assists
to go with her 422 points.
“Kari’s an asset in every
phase of the game, the kind
of player who makes every-
one around her better,”
Smith said about his star
player. “She makes good
decisions and she’s a leader
and a role model. She’s the
whole package.”
As Smith pointed out,
Borowiak’s contributions to
the success of this year’s
team went far beyond num-
bers and stats.
“We put a lot on Kari’s back
this year because we had
such a young team,” Smith
said. “She allowed the
younger players to look to
her for physical and emo-
tional support and she gave
them confidence.”
Borowiak knew what her
role would be this season and
she embraced it.
“I knew it would be a
whole different team coming
into my senior year and the
other girls would be looking
to me to be a leader,” she
said. “I did feel some pres-
sure at first but everybody
was motivated and worked
hard and we jelled together
as a team really well. That
made a big difference for all
of us.”
Borowiak noted that this
was supposed to be a
“rebuilding season” for the
Snowbirds, who lost several
key players from the team
that reached the Class D
quarterfinals the previous
two years.
“The bar was set pretty
high for us but we knew com-
ing in we had to establish our
own identity this year,” she
said. “Over the summer dur-
ing team camps we kind of
struggled. In our first few
games (of the season) we
were still working through
things and coming together.
But we were improving and
we came out on top and that
gave us a lot of confidence
going forward.”
Borowiak focused her
energies on improving the
non-scoring aspects of her
game and that paid big divi-
dends as the Snowbirds kept
winning games.
“My goal this year was to
improve my rebounding and
assists and to continue to be
a consistent scorer too,” she
said. “In the beginning it
wasn’t as tough but when we
started playing teams (in the
league) the second time
around I faced a lot more
pressure. It was frustrating
not being able to penetrate
as much or have open shots,
but the other girls stepped up
too and that made us a lot
stronger as a team.”
Borowiak and fellow
Dream Team member, long-
armed sophomore Bekah
Myler, developed a chemistry
that proved to be a catalyst
for the Snowbirds as the sea-
son went along.
“Bekah and I could kind of
read each other,” Borowiak
said. “We knew where each
other would be. Having
Bekah inside helped a lot
because when the other team
started putting two players
on me, Bekah made them
pay for it.”
Borowiak, the daughter of
Mitch and Karen Borowiak of
Gaylord, will be taking her
game to Concordia
University in Ann Arbor next
year.
“When the coach at
Concordia talked to me the
first time, he was really nice
and encouraging,” Kari said.
“When I went there and visit-
ed it was small and I liked
that. It wasn’t intimidating or
anything. I watched a prac-
tice and liked the way he ran
it and the style the girls play
there. I felt like I could fit in.
“They try to push the ball
but they’re very controlled on
offense,” she added. “They’re
offensively pretty quick but
they’re still aggressive defen-
sively.”
Smith has no doubt
Borowiak will shine in col-
lege as she did in high school
and perhaps even more.
“I believe Kari will blossom
at Concordia because other
teams won’t be focusing just
on stopping her the way they
did in high school,” he said.
“As point guard, she’ll be able
to use her passing, her floor
vision and her shooting skills
in ways she wasn’t always
able to at St. Mary. The spac-
ing and timing will be so
much better at that level and
that’ll only make Kari’s game
that much better.”
Coach of the Year
Smith and assistant coach-
es Pat Schultz and Jeff Hunter
recognized coming into the
2013-14 season that the suc-
cess of the team in the long
run would depend on how
quickly the underclassmen
developed.
“We knew it was going to
be a huge challenge because
we had such a young team,”
said Smith, who is himself a
former scholar-athlete at St.
Mary who excelled in foot-
ball, basketball, track and
baseball. “We knew we would
have to rely on Kari for sure
early on and rely on our other
senior Caylee Lawnichak and
on Bekah because they were
the only other players with
any kind of varsity experi-
ence.
“Fortunately for us, Danica
Bebble, Georgi Nowicki and
Gabby Schultz worked very
hard and solidified their
positions on the floor and
that allowed us to keep get-
ting better as we went along.”
St. Mary was able to do win
the Ski Valley title outright
this season, which was a
notable achievement given
the level of competition,
especially facing Bellaire and
Johannesburg- Lewi st on
twice each.
“The conference was very
tough again and there was
some parity that we haven’t
seen in a while,” he said.
“Joburg and Bellaire were as
tough as they’ve been in the
last several years. For us to
get three of four of those
games is a testament to all
the girls on the team coming
together and knowing what it
takes to win those high-
stakes games.”
Smith’s biggest disappoint-
ment was falling to Bellaire in
the district finals but he was-
n’t disappointed in his team.
“I thought the one differ-
ent between us and Bellaire
in the rubber game was their
veteran players,” Smith said.
“They started four seniors
and one junior and that’s
where they had the advan-
tage. We started one senior,
three sophomores and a
freshman.
“Regardless of that, we still
had a great season and it was
a privilege for me to coach
another great group of kids at
St. Mary. I couldn’t be more
proud of the effort of all the
young ladies on the team.”
Joining Smith on the 2014
Top Choice coaching staff are
Heather Huff of
Johannesburg-Lewi ston,
Frank Hamilla of Gaylord and
Ben Tarbutton of Mancelona,
who guided the Lady
Ironmen to eight wins and a
late-season upset of Bellaire
in his first year at the helm of
a program that had not won a
game for two-plus seasons.
Page 2-B • Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice April 3, 2014
LOCAL SPORTS
On-line at www.weeklychoice.com
Top Choice Girls Basketball
Continued...
S.. Ma,2 -!)%*, Ka,% B*,*1%a& 1%.$ .$! C'a-- D ,!#%*)a' c$a(+%*)-$%+ .,*+$2 -$! $!'+! .$!
S)*1b%,- ac$%!0! 'a-. 2!a,. PHOTO BY DAVE BARAGREY
Look for the 2014 Top
Choice All-Area boys
basketball team in the
April 10 issue of the
Weekly Choice
NEXT ISSUE
The Michigan Department
of Natural Resources annual-
ly adjusts fishing regulations
to ensure that the state's fish-
eries' resources are managed
properly and to provide the
best benefits to anglers and
the public.
For the coming 2014-2015
angling year, which started
Tuesday, April 1, the DNR
would like anglers to be
aware of the following new
fishing regulations:
•Crayfish Possession and
Use - Non-native crayfish
species, including but not
limited to red swamp cray-
fish and rusty crayfish, may
not be possessed or used for
bait, whether dead or alive,
on any public or private
waters of Michigan.
•Muskellunge Size Limits -
Larger size limits for muskel-
lunge are now in effect for
Gun Lake in Barry County (46
inches) and Big Bear Lake in
Otsego County (50 inches).
• H o o k - a n d - L i n e
Restrictions - It is now
unlawful to fish with artificial
bait or minnows in the
Clinton River cut-off channel
in Macomb County from the
spillway weir to the Harper
Road Bridge from March 16
until the Friday before the
last Saturday in April.
•Walleye Size Limits - A
minimum size limit of 15
inches for walleye is now in
effect for Craig Lake State
Park waters in Baraga
County.
•Special Regulations
Removed - The special regu-
lations and permit require-
ment to fish at Jewett Lake in
Ogemaw County have been
removed. General statewide
regulations now apply.
In addition, anglers are
reminded that the Betsie
River spawning closure is still
in effect. The lower portion of
the Betsie River from the
Betsie Valley Trail Bridge west
to a line in Betsie Bay
between the westernmost
dock of the Northstar Marina
and the westernmost dock of
the Eastshore Marina
remains closed to fishing
until further notice.
Detailed information on
these regulation changes and
more can be found in the
2014 Michigan Fishing
Guide, now available at all
major retailers and on the
DNR website at www.michi-
gan.gov/fishing.
New fishing
regulations now in effect
Northeast Lower Peninsula
Fishing Report
Au Sable River: Is open
and accessible for shore and
boat anglers. The launch at
Rea Road was the most open
as ice was still built up at the
Whirlpool. Steelhead were
caught near the gas line and
the mouth. Try spawn, wax
worms, small spoons, body
baits or flies.
Higgins Lake: Ice anglers
are still getting some perch
along the north end near
Evergreen Park, the church
camp and Sunken Island. For
rainbow trout, try wigglers
near the Conference Center.
The lake trout bite has
slowed and no word on
smelt.
Tawas: A few nice perch
were caught in 18 feet off
Jerry's Marina however
anglers were throwing back a
lot of small ones. Quite a few
were fishing inside the har-
bor but the fish were small. A
few walleye were caught out
past the end of Tawas Point in
water at least 20 feet deep.
Au Gres: There were lots of
anglers fishing off Palmer
Road. They're getting both
walleye and perch from 6 to 8
feet of water. No limits but
some nice fish were caught.
Au Gres River: Steelhead
anglers hoping to fish the
East Branch will have to wait
a bit longer because Whitney
Drain near the Singing Bridge
is still iced in.
Rifle River: Dip net season
opened on March 20th how-
ever anglers will be waiting a
while as the river was still
iced in.
Northwest Lower Peninsula
Fishing Report
The area has more snow
and continued frigid temper-
atures which is making ice,
not melting it! Ice fishing
continues like it has for the
last four months.
Traverse City: Those fish-
ing the East Bay have caught
lake trout in 80 to 150 feet off
Deepwater Point. Most are
jigging sand kickers or white
Swedish pimples. The West
Bay had slower catch rates
but lake trout, cicso and
whitefish were caught in 96
feet near the pressure crack
which is out from the boat
launch on M-22.
Boardman River: Anglers
are starting to see some steel-
head.
Upper Peninsula Fishing
Report
Cedarville and Hessel: The
perch harvest has been slow.
It looks like catch rates will
not pick up until spring not
only arrives, but stays.
Little Bay De Noc: Ice con-
ditions remain the same. If
you have an extension for
your auger you might want to
bring it. Perch anglers had
mixed results. A majority of
fish were caught from the
Second Reef in Kipling to just
south of the "Narrows". Deep
water 30 to 40 feet is best for
jumbo perch. Those fishing
in 10 feet of water on the east
side of Butler Island caught
lots of small fish. Whitefish
were caught in 35 to 40 feet
off Gladstone however the
better catches were off Sand
Point in 75 to 85 feet.
Munising: Angler numbers
and catch rates were down.
The thick ice is almost
impossible for those without
a power auger. A couple
salmon were caught between
Sand Point and the Anna
River. Try jigging spoons 20 to
30 feet down. Some say the
bigger whitefish were moving
towards shallow water.
Anglers will want to try
bouncing eggs off the bot-
tom. Splake action was slow.
Try minnows off Sand Point
and the City Pier for bigger
fish. Anglers are marking
smelt but catch rates were
poor. Catch rates for burbot
have increased. Herring were
caught near the river
mouths. In Trout Bay, catch
rates were spotty.
Munuscong: Some perch
were caught near Grassy
Island and west of Dan's
Resort.
Long winter still impacting
anglers
Harvest of perch and steelhead will remain slow until
spring really arrives
DNR fishing report
PETOSKEY – Petoskey sen-
ior Joe LeBlanc has earned
first-team All-Big North
Conference recognition in
boys hoops after helping the
Northmen to a 9-5 record in
the league and a 14-7 mark
overall.
Joining LeBlanc from
coach Dennis Starkey’s
Northmen team are a trio of
sophomores on the honor-
able mention roster: Evan
Whitmore, Aron Lee and
Jason Bur.
Representing Gaylord on
the All-Big North roster are
junior forward Collin Watters
on the second team and
hardworking senior Zach
Pasternak on the honorable
mention rolls.
LeBla!c i$ fi#$%-%ea All-Big N"#%h
Petoskey senior helps young Northmen squad to 14-win season; Watters earns sec-
ond team for Gaylord
Ba$ke%ball
FIRST TEAM:
Andy Merwede (12), Alpena
Jalen Brooks (12), Cadillac
Alex Scott (11), T.C. West
Tyler Pintar (11), Alpena
Joe LeBlanc (12), Petoskey
SECOND TEAM:
Stephen Sheppard (11), T.C. West
Brad Styma (11), Alpena
Justin Liptar (12), Cadillac
Ben Hartley (11), Ogemaw Heights
Collin Watters (11), Gaylord
HONORABLE MENTION:
Cody Tucker (12), Alpena
Andrew Emington (11), Cadillac
Lewis Finch (11), Cadillac
Zach Pasternak (12), Gaylord
Dillion Zettel (11), Ogemaw Heights
Alec Stevens (12), Ogemaw Heights
Aron Lee (10), Petoskey
Evan Whitmore (10), Petoskey
Jason Bur (10), Petoskey
Mitch Wynkoop (12), T.C. Central
Jackson Schrameyer (10), T.C. Central
Thiyo Lukusa (10), T.C. West
Jonny Wheelock (12), T.C. West
BIG NORTH CONFERENCE 2014 BOYS BASKETBALL
April 3, 2014 Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice • Page 3-B
LOCAL SPORTS
On-line at www.weeklychoice.com
By Mike Dunn
MOUNT PLEASANT – The
Gaylord and Petoskey track
teams traveled south on
Wednesday, March 26, to
participate in the annual
Chippewa Relays at Central
Michigan University. The
Division 1-2 indoor meet
drew teams from around the
state.
There were some very
good individual performanc-
es at the meet for both the
Blue Devils and the
Northmen.
FOR THE BOYS, Gaylord
senior Sterling McPherson
shined in the 1600-meter
run, taking second among all
the D-2 schools in the meet
and sixth overall with a stellar
early-season time of 4:56.06.
Strong-striding junior
Steven Fitzek flew to a third-
place finish in the 60-meter
hurdles, and sixth overall,
with his whiplash time of
9.05 seconds. Fitzek also
earned a respectable top-20
overall finish in the 400 dash
in 57.48 seconds.
Junior Collin Watters
poured it on for the Blue
Devils in the 400 dash, taking
sixth overall in 56.5 seconds.
Coach Matt Warren also
noted the performances of
freshmen Jack Hervela and
Nate Boswood. Hervela
turned in a strong early-sea-
son time of 5:08.48 in the
1600 run and Boswood
burned the track with his
time of 25.02 seconds in the
200 dash.
In the field events, Justin
Roberson secured 15th place
overall in the high jump,
clearing the bar at 5 feet, 4
inches. Austin Kirby reached
a distance of 17 feet, 5.5 inch-
es in the long jump and Zak
Goddard completed the 800
run in 2:18.63.
For the Petoskey boys, Tom
VanSlembrouck turned on
the juice in the final leg to
secure a very respectable
eighth-place time of 10:57.73
in the 3200 run.
B.J. Chatterson, legs
pumping like pistons,
churned out an outstanding
fourth-place time of 8.86 sec-
onds in the 60-meter hurdles.
Versatile Andy Frampus flew
over the pole vault bar at a
height of 10 feet, 6 inches to
earn a top-10 finish in that
event and Frampus also
earned a top-25 finish in the
800 run with his time of
2:18.94.
Mark Smith took 17th
place overall in the highly
competitive 1600 run with
his respectable time of
5:04.02.
ON THE GIRLS’ side for
Gaylord, it was the flying feet
of freshman Savannah Krone
carrying her to a second-
place overall finish in a wind-
burn time of 27.83 seconds.
Teammate Maddie
MacQuarrie also had a
notable showing in the race,
taking 19th overall in 29.7
seconds.
Sophomore Alexis Smith
also showed up big at the
huge indoor invitational, tak-
ing sixth place overall in the
1600 run in a time of 5:46.18.
Sophomore Casey Korte
launched herself to a gravity-
defying distance of 16 feet, 2
inches to take third place
overall in the long jump at
CMU.
The fine-tuned 1600 relay
foursome of Grace Sanders,
Savannah Krone, Casey Korte
and Erin Borgeson teamed
up to take third place overall
in a lung-stretching time of
4:29.08. Borgeson also blew
to a 17th place time of 1:08.19
in the 400 dash.
Sanders also secured 11th
place in the 60-meter dash
(8.60) and 18th in the long
jump (13-6). MacQuarrie
dashed to a 13th-place time
of 8.66 seconds in the 60
dash.
Sydney Borowiak stormed
to an 11th-place time of
10.79 seconds in the 60 hur-
dles and Skyler Wickert flew
through the air to take 12th
in the high jump (4-6).
Freshman Bailey Checks
deposited the shot put 29
feet, 2 inches to take 12th
place overall and teammate
Lauren Reed (28-9) was close
behind in 14th place.
For Petoskey, Lily Cesario
was simply sensational in the
3200 run, pushing to a strong
second-place finish in a
remarkable early-season
time of 11:52.56. Lily also
anchored Petoskey’s 3200
relay, which took ninth in
11:02.85.
Sarah Goble and Sydney
Hopp each secured a top-10
finish in the 1600 run for the
Northmen, with Goble fin-
ishing eighth in 5:52.44 and
Hopp taking 10th in 6:00.64.
Teammate Jalynn Byers
earned 20th place in 6:16.04.
Carolyn Norton took 20th
in the 400 dash (1:10.39) and
Kristen Coats took 26th in the
800 run (3:02.33).
In the field events, it was
Shae Luch launching to a
21st-place distance of 13 feet,
3.5 inches in the long jump
and strong-armed Alexis
Knapp landing the shot put
28 feet, 3 inches to take 18th
place.
Blue Devils, Northmen take part in annual Chippewa Relays Indoor Meet
Track
Gaylord, Petoskey vie at CMU
|s oow ava||ab|e at Johosoo 0|| Narathoo
Narathoo

Vara|0oo PF0 90 |s 90 oc|aoe /ead Free 0aso||oe
per/ec| /or recrea||ooa| re0|c|es.
PE00HHEN0E0 F0P ALL 0APßUPETE0 VEh|0LE$ |N0LU0|N0:
BOATS · ATV'S · MOTORCYCLES · LAWNMOWERS · CLASSIC CARS
!0|s 0|y0 oc|aoe /ae| cao a|so be ased |o oener /ae| |ojec|ed re0|c|es
FEATUPE$ 0F Th|$ FUEL |N0LU0E:
· BETTER MILEAGE
· NO PHASE SEPERATION PROBLEMS
· MORE PERFORMANCE
· CONTAINS MARATHON STP ADDITIVES
|||||\l|1ä\| 1ä||\ä|ä ä\J
502 8. 0¡8£60 A¥£. º 6A¥L080 º 989-732-6014
5021 000ß¡¥ 80. 612 º L£wI8¡0ß º 989-786-3397
J0ßß80ß 0IL
MA8A¡ß0ß
Available exclusively at...
L£wI8¡0ß
MA8A¡ß0ß
7th & 8th Grade
Boys
3/24/2014
Tyler Bishop ...............22
Josh Powers ................17
Andrew Chiles............14
Dustin Churches........13
Joey Pietrzak ..............12
Stephen White............12
Tyler Madej ..................9
Brendan Lamerson......8
Nate Byrne ...................6
Jonathan Perry.............6
Ethan Piehl...................5
Matthew Samalik.........5
Joe Bush........................4
Caleb Hoeh ..................4
Zach Lauster ................4
Will Gardner.................3
Blake Wright.................3
Tyler Cherry .................2
Issac Day ......................2
Brady Dexter ................2
Steve Dreffs ..................2
Jake Fonsek ..................2
Nicholas Switalski........2
Top
Scorers
GAYLORD – The All-Big
North Conference girls bas-
ketball team for 2014 was
announced recently and
Gaylord, which finished as
runner-up to Cadillac, was
well-represented.
Earning first-team recog-
nition for the Blue Devils
were senior Maddie Hamilla,
who led the league in scoring
with 12.4 points per game,
and silky-smooth sophomore
Brandi Wagner. Earning hon-
orable mention were hard-
driving senior Lauren Hintz
and blue-collar junior
Lindsey Zaremba.
For Petoskey, it was hard-
working senior Kati Lewis
being named to the second
team and fellow senior
Amanda Stinger earning
honorable mention.
All-Big North girls team named
Hamilla, Wagner of Blue Devils are first-team picks; Lewis of Petoskey makes
second team
Page 4-B • Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice April 3, 2014
LOCAL SPORTS
On-line at www.weeklychoice.com
Basketball
The Department of
Natural Resources reminds
anglers that a new fishing
license season began
Tuesday, April 1, coinciding
with the new regulation
cycle. All 2013 fishing licens-
es are good through March
31, 2014.
Michigan's fishing licens-
es were restructured March
1. Anglers now have five
options when making their
purchases:
•Resident Annual - $26
•Nonresident Annual -
$76
•Senior Annual (for resi-
dents age 65 or older) - $11
•24-hour (resident or non-
resident) - $10
•72-hour (resident or non-
resident) - $30
All fishing licenses are
good for all species.
Residents and nonresi-
dents also can purchase the
hunt/fish combo license for
$76 and $266, respectively,
that consists of a base
license, annual fishing
license and two deer tags. A
base license is not required
when purchasing just a fish-
ing license.
Revenue generated from
the new fishing licenses will
be invested into Michigan's
fisheries, including greater
access to world-class fishing
opportunities, improving
fisheries habitat in inland
lakes and streams, and
increasing the health and
quantity of fish stocked in
state waters.
The DNR Fisheries
Division depends primarily
on funds received from
license sales and federal
excise taxes on fishing tackle
to manage the state's fish-
eries. Buying a fishing
license, even if you do not
plan to fish, can make a big
difference to the future
health of Michigan's prized
freshwaters.
There are two simple ways
to purchase a fishing license
in Michigan:
•Visit a local license retail-
er or DNR customer service
center and make a purchase
in person.
•Use the E-License system
website to buy a license
online 24 hours a day, seven
days a week. Visit
www.mdnr-elicense.com on
your computer, smartphone
or tablet to get started.
For more information on
fishing in Michigan, visit
www.michigan.gov/fishing.
New fishing
license needed
April 1
New regulation cycle for fishing also start-
ed this week
Website Management
Ìnternet Ìnternet
Marketing Marketing
Website Website
Design Design
Web Web
Development Development
E-Commerce E-Commerce
Store Store
Social Social
Networking Networking
Search Engine Search Engine
Optimization Optimization
When we build websites we use a
content management system. This
means you can manage your website in-
house with no technical knowledge. But
there's more to managing a website
than being able to add new pages and
pictures.
If you think about the job specification
of the person you would need to employ
to carry out all that's involved with run-
ning a successful website it would need
to cover.....
Website Management, the Smart Choice
* 6raph|c des|go
* web Programm|og
* 0opy wr|t|og
* Search £og|oe 0pt|m|zat|oo
* 0eep koow|edge oI web techoo|og|es
* 80s|oess Aoa|ys|s
* Ab|||ty to see treods aod react to them
* ........aod m0ch more.
Michigan Media provides all the required
skills in one web management package and
helps you build your business and its web pres-
ence.
The service is fully proactive and every
month we provide full reporting of what we have
done and a hit list of activity for the month. And
it does not stop there. We can also offer social
networking management services for your busi-
ness. Facebook, MySpace, Twitter, YouTube
and other websites that offer ways to advertise
your business are our speciality.
Contact Us Contact Us
For more |oIormat|oo oo
how we cao he|p yo0
|mprove yo0r webs|te
cootact:
chad@week|ycho|ce.com
0r v|s|t 0s oo||oe at
www.0ho|ceP0b.com
FIRST TEAM:
Maddie Hamilla (12), Gaylord
Brandi Wagner (10), Gaylord
Abbey Fuller (12), Cadillac
Hannah Baker (12), Cadillac
Kiley Kreple (12), T.C. West
SECOND TEAM:
Kari Lewis (12), Petoskey
Kimmy Bilinski (12), T.C. West
Paris Wagner (11), T.C. West
Samantha Hasse (12), Ogemaw Heights
Elizabeth Trelfa (12), Alpena
HONORABLE MENTION:
Adrianna Hatch (11), Alpena
Jenna Talbot (11), Alpena
Darby McLaurin (12), Cadillac
Jenna Erway (11), Cadillac
Lindsey Zaremba (11), Gaylord
Lauren Hintz (12), Gaylord
Marcie Meier (12), Ogemaw Heights
Shelby Miller (11), Ogemaw Heights
Amanda Singer (12), Petoskey
Sierra Fraser (10), T.C. Central
Callie Bartkowiak (12), T.C. Central
Eliza McCall (11), T.C. Central
Mikaela Ray (12), T.C. West
BIG NORTH CONFERENCE 2014 GIRLS BASKETBALL
OTSEGO COUNTY –
Although some areas of the
state may still have several
feet of snow on the ground,
Michigan's wildlife knows
the spring season – with an
increase in daylight hours – is
here.
Animals are beginning to
wake up from winter hiber-
nation; bears are among
those starting to emerge
from their dens.
Food and mating are the
two drivers behind the
increase in wildlife that
Michigan residents may be
seeing lately. Since bears typ-
ically mate in June or July,
food is the primary cause for
the increase in bear activity
during the spring.
"At this time of year, bears
are looking for food," said
Department of Natural
Resources bear and furbearer
specialist Adam Bump. "They
are hungry after spending
months in their dens. While
we might not think of bird
feeders and trash cans as
food sources, a hungry bear
certainly may."
Each spring, as bears leave
their winter dens and resume
daily activity, wildlife officials
begin receiving calls about
bear sightings and even the
occasional bear damaging
bird feeders, trash cans and
grills.
Birdseed, because of its
high fat content and easy
accessibility, is especially
attractive to bears. Once bird
feeders are discovered, bears
will keep coming back until
the seed is gone or the feed-
ers have been removed.
"The majority of com-
plaints we receive about nui-
sance bears in the spring
involve a food source. The
easiest thing people can do
to avoid creating a problem is
to take in their bird feeders
and store other attractants,
like grills, trash cans and pet
food, in a garage or storage
shed," Bump said. "Once the
woods green up, bears tend
to move on to find more nat-
ural sources of food, as long
as they haven't become
habituated to the birdseed or
garbage cans."
Bears that are rewarded
with food each time they visit
a yard can become habituat-
ed to these food sources
unintentionally provided by
people. This can create an
unsafe situation for the bear
and become a nuisance for
landowners if a bear continu-
ously visits their yard during
the day and repeatedly
destroys private property in
search of food.
DNR Wildlife Division staff
members are unable to
respond directly to each nui-
sance bear complaint and
instead ask that landowners
do their part to help reduce
potential food sources in
their yards before calling for
further assistance. The trap-
ping of nuisance bears is only
authorized by DNR wildlife
officials in cases of signifi-
cant property damage or
threats to human safety
when other techniques have
failed.
Anyone who is experienc-
ing problems with nuisance
bears and has taken the
appropriate action to remove
food sources for a period of
two to three weeks, but has
not seen results, should con-
tact the nearest DNR office
and speak with a wildlife
biologist or technician for
further assistance.
For more information, go
to www.michigan.gov/bear.
Spring weather impacts wildlife
Bears are emerging from hibernation and looking for food; other wildlife are on the move
MANISTEE – Macomb
County man was arraigned
recently in 85th District
Court in Manistee County
on charges of illegally taking
a black bear without a per-
mit and excessive use of
deer bait. The charges stem
from a Nov. 16 bear poach-
ing incident in Manistee
County during the firearm
deer hunting season. James
Earl May, 33, allegedly shot
and killed a bear and left it
to die in the woods. May will
appear at a pre-trial exam in
85th District Court on April
9.
Michigan conservation
officer Carla Soper original-
ly responded to a complaint
of a black bear lying dead in
the woods in Manistee
County. While investigating
the complaint, the DNR put
out a statewide press release
asking for information and
May contacted the investi-
gating officer shortly after as
a result. Soper was able to
interview him and present
her case to the Manistee
County prosecutor.
The Manistee County
prosecutor’s office issued an
arrest warrant for May on
the charges of taking a bear
without a permit and use of
excessive deer bait.
Conservation officer Kris
Kiel arrested May at his
Macomb County residence
on March 2.
The bear had been found
dead of a shotgun wound
near a hunting blind on
public land in Cleon
Township. Witnesses said
that the bear had been
killed on Nov. 16 at approxi-
mately 5:30 p.m. Three bear
cubs are believed to have
been orphaned as a result of
the bear being killed,
although the cubs were not
located.
Poaching bear in
Michigan carries a restitu-
tion payment of $1,500 per
bear, a minimum $200 fine
and jail time of up to 90
days. In addition, a viola-
tor's hunting privileges may
be suspended for up to
three years.
The DNR’s Report All
Poaching (RAP) Line is
available 24 hours a day, 365
days a year to take informa-
tion regarding any fish or
game violations in
Michigan. The number for
the RAP Line is 800-292-
7800. Information also can
be reported online at
www.michigan.gov/conser-
vationofficers.
Information may be left
anonymously, though infor-
mation leading to an arrest
and conviction is eligible for
a cash reward funded by the
Game and Fish Protection
Fund.
Man arraigned for
bear poaching
Conservation officers arrest man who
allegedly poached black bear in Manistee
County
The Department of Natural
Resources reminds everyone
that after the heavy ice and
snow cover melts on
Michigan's lakes in early
spring, it may be common to
discover dead fish or other
aquatic creatures. This year's
severe winter, with heavy
snow and ice cover, will cre-
ate conditions that cause fish
and other creatures such as
turtles, frogs, toads and cray-
fish to die.
"Winterkill is the most
common type of fish kill,"
said Gary Whelan, DNR fish
production manager. "Given
the harsh conditions this
winter with thick ice and
deep snow cover, it will be
particularly common in shal-
low lakes and streams and
ponds. These kills are local-
ized and typically do not
affect the overall health of
the fish populations or fish-
ing quality."
Winterkill occurs during
especially long, harsh win-
ters ? similar to the one expe-
rienced this year. Shallow
lakes with excess aquatic
vegetation and soft bottoms
are particularly prone to this
problem. Fish and other
aquatic life typically die in
late winter, but may not be
noticed until a month after
the ice leaves the lake
because the dead fish and
other aquatic life are tem-
porarily preserved by the
cold water.
"Winterkill begins with
distressed fish gasping for air
at holes in the ice and often
ends with large numbers of
dead fish that bloat as the
water warms in early spring,"
Whelan explained. "Dead
fish and other aquatic life
may appear fuzzy because of
secondary infection by fun-
gus, but the fungus was not
the cause of death. The fish
actually suffocated from a
lack of dissolved oxygen from
decaying plants and other
dead aquatic animals under
the ice."
Dissolved oxygen is
required by fish and all other
forms of aquatic life. Once
the daylight is greatly
reduced by thick ice and
deep snow cover, aquatic
plants stop producing oxy-
gen and many die. The bacte-
ria that decompose organic
materials on the bottom of
the lake use the remaining
oxygen in the water. Once the
oxygen is reduced other
aquatic animals die and start
decomposing, the rate that
oxygen is used for decompo-
sition is additionally
increased and dissolved oxy-
gen levels in the water
decrease even more leading
to increasing winterkill.
For more information on
fish kills in Michigan, visit
www.michigan.gov/fishing.
If you suspect a fish kill is
caused by non-natural caus-
es, please call the nearest
DNR office or Michigan's
Pollution Emergency Alert
System at 1-800-292-4706.
The Michigan Department
of Natural Resources is com-
mitted to the conservation,
protection, management,
use and enjoyment of the
state's natural and cultural
resources for current and
future generations. For more
information, go to
www.michigan.gov/dnr.
The Department of Natural
Resources today announced
that, starting April 1, the
application period will open
for the new Deer Private
Land Assistance Network
(Deer PLAN) grant program.
The Deer PLAN, funded by
the Fish and Game Fund, is
designed to support private-
land deer habitat improve-
ment projects in the north-
ern Lower Peninsula.
"There are two primary
goals applicants should
strive to meet," said DNR
wildlife biologist Brian
Piccolo. "The projects should
produce tangible deer habi-
tat improvements and build
long-term partnerships
between the DNR and
sportsmen's clubs."
For 2014, $50,000 will be
available, focused on the fol-
lowing counties: Alcona,
Alpena, Crawford,
Montmorency, Oscoda and
Presque Isle. Funds will be
allocated across these six
counties based on a compet-
itive grant application scor-
ing process.
"A focus area will concen-
trate habitat projects in a
particular region, and in
doing so will provide greater
benefits to deer populations
in areas where we have iden-
tified habitat issues," said
DNR Deer Program biologist
Ashley Autenrieth.
Application amounts must
be between $2,000 and
$10,000 and the grant recipi-
ent is required to provide 25
percent of the total grant
amount. Projects can take
place on private land,
Commercial Forest Act land
or other non-state-owned
land.
Project applications are
due by May 14. Successful
applicants will be notified by
May 30.
The complete grant appli-
cation package is available
online at
www. mi chi gan. gov/dnr-
grants by following the Deer
PLAN link under Wildlife
Habitat Management near
the bottom of the page.
The Deer PLAN grant pro-
gram is made possible by
Michigan's new hunting and
fishing license structure.
LOCAL SPORTS
On-line at www.weeklychoice.com
April 3, 2014 Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice • Page 5-B
Deer PLAN grant
program underway
Program is designed to support private-
lane deer habitat improvements projects in
northern Lower Peninsula
Classified Ads As
Low As
$
2
00
20¢ A WORD
MINIMUM. $2.00
GET DOUBLE
THE COVERAGE!
Just log on to:
Or call: 989-732-8160
weeklychoice
.com
Pick up the Weekly Choice each
week for comprehensive coverage
of area High School Basketball.
Our distribution newspaper is
now distributed in 40 towns
including Gaylord, Petoskey,
Cheboygan, Grayling, lndian River,
Onaway, Mancelona, Lewiston and Mio.
Available on Newstands on Thursdays!
Follow
Action
t
h
e
0a||: 989-732-8160 Fax:(888} 854-7441
0II|ce@week|y0ho|ce.com º www.week|y0ho|ce.com
Parents and fans can send photos, local news and news releases
to us at [email protected]
PUBLlSHERS OF THE WEEKLY CHOlCE AND CHARLEvOlX COUNTY NEWS
F%-$ &%'' -/c$ a- !+%c.!
%) .$%- +$*.* ",*( .$!
DNR (a2 b! a c*((*)
-%#$. .$%- -+,%)# a".!, .$!
$a,-$ 1%).!,. COURTESY OF DNR
GAYLORD – With the 2014
fuelwood season underway
this week, the Department
of Natural Resources has
streamlined its system to
make it more convenient for
residents to purchase per-
sonal-use fuelwood permits
in person and by mail. The
season runs through Dec.
31.
The mail-in order forms
are available online at the
DNR website www.michi-
gan.gov/fuelwood.
“Folks are encouraged to
save gas and time by order-
ing this year’s fuelwood per-
mit through the mail,” said
Bill O’Neill, chief of the
DNR Forest Resources
Division. “Many people
rely on wood to heat their
homes at a lower cost. We
wanted to give people a
couple of options for pur-
chasing their permits to
make the process easier
and more convenient.”
Permits cost $20 and
are for use on designated
state forest land in the
northern two-thirds of the
state and allow for collec-
tion of up to five standard
cords of wood per house-
hold. Fuelwood collected
with the permit can be used
for personal use only and
cannot be resold or traded.
The permits are good for 90
days.
In response to residents’
heating energy needs dur-
ing Michigan’s long winter
this year, the DNR began
early sales of 2014 fuelwood
permits – more than a
month before the tradition-
al starting date of April 1.
Because of the unique
winter, the DNR is allowing
those who purchased an
emergency permit to pur-
chase another regular per-
mit this calendar year.
The DNR has issued fuel-
wood permits for decades
and issues between 2,500
and 3,500 each year.
For further information
on how and where to pur-
chase a personal-use fuel-
wood permit, contact your
local DNR office or visit
www.michigan.gov/fuel-
wood.
DNR fuelwood
permits now
available
Fish kill may be common this spring
Long, severe with heavy snow and ice cover creates conditions that cause fish
and other aquatic creatures to die
photomichigan.com
Your photos on the web
Bob Gingerich
[email protected]
989-348-5355
1923 Dansk Lane, Grayling, MI 49738
4 WHEEL DRIVE
2000 FCF8 +5B;9F 1%-. 40D, 7FI=G9,
5=F, HCK, 119 $. AG @CK 5G $139 5
ACBH<. DF=J9 'CK AIHC ,5@9G, 2215
., !=;<K5M 31 ', )9HCG?9M. )<CB9
231-347-3200. KKK.8F=J9BCK123.7CA
2002 FCF8 ELD@CF9F 1%-. 40D, B=79.
AG @CK 5G $159 5 ACBH<. DF=J9 'CK
AIHC ,5@9G, 2215 ., !=;<K5M 31 ',
)9HCG?9M. )<CB9 231-347-3200.
KKK.8F=J9BCK123.7CA
2003 FCF8 ELD@CF9F 1%-. 40D,
@95H<9F, HCK D?;. AG @CK 5G $159 5
ACBH<. DF=J9 'CK AIHC ,5@9G, 2215
., !=;<K5M 31 ', )9HCG?9M. )<CB9
231-347-3200. KKK.8F=J9BCK123.7CA
2004 C<9JM CC@CF58C ELH. C56 %,
4L4. CA+FA1 1 CKB9F =B B@57?/B@57?
C@CH<. BF5B8 B9K CCCD9F H=F9G CB
5@@CMG! CD, A=F, F95H A=@95;9 CIH C: 5
2.8 @=H9F 4 7M@, CCA9 7<97? =H CIH!
$9,449. D5J9 $F=B; C<9JFC@9H-
C58=@@57, 1861 ., 31 'CFH<,
)9HCG?9M, &" 231-347-2585.
2005 -CMCH5 !=;<@5B89F. 40D, HCK
D?;, 4 7M@, ;F95H &). ,5@9 )F=79
$9,795. +=J9FHCKB AIHC FCID, 989
/F0 +C58, C<96CM;5B, &" 231-627-
6700. KKK.+=J9FAIHC.B9H
2007 C<9JM ,=@J9F58C %- 4L4 3-71.
'9K AFF=J5@ =B F5MGHCB9 &9H5@@=7!
-<9 6CL @CC?G 65F9@M IG98, 899D =B
FI669F! BF=;<H 18 5@@CMG. 4.8 @=H9F /8.
-5?9 =H :CF 5 F=89! $16,888. D5J9
$F=B; C<9JFC@9H-C58=@@57, 1861 ., 31
'CFH<, )9HCG?9M, &" 231-347-2585.
2008 C<9JM ,=@J9F58C. 3-71, 4L4,
G95HG 5, 698@=B9F. 79 $. /9FM B=79.
,5@9 )F=79 $18,995. +=J9FHCKB AIHC
FCID, 989 /F0 +C58, C<96CM;5B,
&" 231-627-6700. KKK.+=J9FAIHC.B9H
2013 #99D 0F5B;@9F ,DCFH 4L4. CA+-
FA1 1 CKB9F =B B@57?/B@57? C@CH<!
'9K 89G=;B98 285 !), 3.6 @=H9F /-6 O
&(+E )(0E+! +9ACJ56@9 HCD,
AIHCA5H=7, 15,700 A=@9G, B=79!
$25,949. D5J9 $F=B; C<9JFC@9H-
C58=@@57, 1861 ., 31 'CFH<,
)9HCG?9M, &" 231-347-2585.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
$6.99 %.'C!. 13 8=::9F9BH H5GHM,
<CA9A589 7<C=79G. -FM BFCG B=GHFC, "-
75 EL=H 270, 05H9FG. 989-705-1800
D( 2(. !A/E ,(&E-!"' '"CE -(
,A2? 09 KCI@8 @=?9 HC <95F GCA9-
H<=B; B=79 MCI <5J9 HC G5M 56CIH 6IG=-
B9GG9G CF D9CD@9 =B 'CFH<9FB
&=7<=;5B. ,9B8 IG 5 BCH9 =B H<9 A5=@
CF 6M 9-A5=@. E57< K99? K9 K=@@ DI6-
@=G< DCG=H=J9 7CAA9BHG :FCA CIF
F9589FG =B H<9 099?@M C<C=79. &5=@
MCIF BCH9 HC 099?@M C<C=79, )( BCL
382, 5M@CF8, &" 49734 CF 9-A5=@ HC
(::=79@099?@MC<C=79.7CA. '9;5H=J9
BCH9G A5M 69 G9BH 9@G9K<9F9. -<9
099?@M C<C=79... -C "B:CFA, -C
EB7CIF5;9, -C "BGD=F9. 'CFH<9FB
&=7<=;5B'G 099?@M +9;=CB5@
CCAAIB=HM '9KGD5D9F
F+"DA2 '"!- F",! FFM. 05@@9M9,
D9F7<, 7C8, D5B :F=98 CF 699F 65H-
H9F98. BFCG B=GHFC, "-75 EL=H 270,
05H9FG. 989-705-1800
!(&E&ADE, +EA% F((D. EJ9FMH<=B;
CB H<9 A9BI =G 5J5=@56@9 :CF H5?9 CIH
5H C66@9FG C: 5M@CF8, 900 ,.
(HG9;C, 5M@CF8. 989-732-9005
&(+E -!A' -.+$E2. )9F7<, G<F=AD,
GA9@H, 7C8, K5@@9M9 9J9FM 85M CB@M 5H
C66@9FG C: 5M@CF8, 900 ,. (HG9;C,
5M@CF8. 989-732-9005
ANNOUNCEMENTS
,A-.+DA2 '"!- !9F6 G95GCB98
DF=A9 F=6. -FM BFCG B=GHFC, "-75 EL=H
270, 05H9FG. 989-705-1800
2CIF C@5GG=:=98 58 =B H<9 099?@M
C<C=79 =G D@5798 =B H<9 '5H=CB5@ 85H5-
65G9 C: ACF9 H<5B 200,000 7@5GG=-
:=98 58G K=H< AA9F=75B C@5GG=:=98G :CF
BC 9LHF5 7<5F;9. C@5GG=:=98 58G =B H<9
099?@M C<C=79 5F9 >IGH $2.00 :CF 10
KCF8G. )@579 MCIF 58 CB-@=B9 5H
KKK.099?@MC<C=79.7CA CF 75@@ 989-
732-8160.
AUCTIONS
%5F;9 AI7H=CB ,5@9 ,5HIF85M ADF=@, 5
@ 10 A.&. ,5@9 F95HIF9G; %=?9 '9K
CI6 C589H 45 !.). %C589F -F57HCF,
%=?9 '9K )C@5F=G 6 )5GG9B;9F ..-./.,
"AD@9A9BH -F5=@9F, ,<CD -CC@G, (20)
F=F95FAG , %CHG (: ,DCFH=B;
CC@@97H=6@9G, ABH=EI9 FIFB=HIF9,
CC@@97H=6@9G, CCIBHFM ,HCF9 "H9AG,
A8J9FH=G=B; "H9AG, #I?9 BCL, (=@
%5ADG, C@C7?G & !CIG9<C@8 "H9AG.
%C75H98: 4991 ,. &-30 B95J9FHCB.
#C<B )97? AI7H=CBG, (989) 426-8061.
FCF A CCAD@9H9 %=GH=B; 0=H< )<CHC'G
/=G=H #(!')EC$A.C-"(',.C(&
AUTOMOBILES
2000 C<9JM C5J5@=9F. FFCBH K<99@
8F=J9, ;F95H &). ,5@9 )F=79 $1,995.
+=J9FHCKB AIHC FCID, 989 /F0
+C58, C<96CM;5B, &" 231-627-6700.
KKK.+=J9FAIHC.B9H
2001 (@8G AIFCF5. F0D, 4.0 %. /-8,
@95H<9F, @C5898, 140 $. ,5@9 )F=79
$4,995. +=J9FHCKB AIHC FCID, 989
/F0 +C58, C<96CM;5B, &" 231-627-
6700. KKK.+=J9FAIHC.B9H
2003 C<9JM &5@=6I. 117,500 A=@9G,
B9K 5@H9FB5HCF. +IBG ;F95H, $3800
C6C. FCF 89H5=@G 75@@ 231-492-7375
2004 C58=@@57 C-,. %95H<9F, DCK9F
ACCB FCC:, DCK9F 9J9FMH<=B;. ,5@9
)F=79 $6,997. +=J9FHCKB AIHC FCID,
989 /F0 +C58, C<96CM;5B, &" 231-
627-6700. KKK.+=J9FAIHC.B9H
2005 C<9JM AJ9C %,. AIHC, 5=F. $149
5 ACBH< CF @9GG. +=J9FHCKB AIHC
FCID, 989 /F0 +C58, C<96CM;5B,
&" 231-627-6700. KKK.+=J9FAIHC.B9H
2006 C<FMG@9F 300. 6 CM@, G97IF=HM
GMGH9A. '=79. AG @CK 5G $179 5
ACBH<. DF=J9 'CK AIHC ,5@9G, 2215
., !=;<K5M 31 ', )9HCG?9M. )<CB9
231-347-3200. KKK.8F=J9BCK123.7CA
2006 DC8;9 C<5F;9F. -<=G =G 5 '"CE
+=89. AG @CK 5G $199 5 ACBH<. DF=J9
'CK AIHC ,5@9G, 2215 ., !=;<K5M 31
', )9HCG?9M. )<CB9 231-347-3200.
KKK.8F=J9BCK123.7CA
2008 DC8;9 AJ9B;9F. CC8 &),
GH56=@=HM 7CBHFC@. 97 $. ,5@9 )F=79
$7,995. $199 5 ACBH< CF @9GG.
+=J9FHCKB AIHC FCID, 989 /F0
+C58, C<96CM;5B, &" 231-627-6700.
KKK.+=J9FAIHC.B9H
AUTOMOBILES
2008 )CBH=57 6 ,DCFHG )?;. F.' HC
8F=J9! ,DCFHM! ,<5FD +98! '=79@M
9EI=DD98! (B,H5F, AB,, F9ACH9 GH5FH,
GH99F=B; 7CBHFC@G, F95F :C@8=B; G95HG,
G<5FD 5@@CMG, F95F GDC=@9F, 3.5 @=H9F /6.
$8,949. D5J9 $F=B; C<9JFC@9H-
C58=@@57, 1861 ., 31 'CFH<,
)9HCG?9M, &" 231-347-2585.
2010 C<9JM "AD5@5. 2 HC 7<CCG9
:FCA. 30 &). '=79 75F. $199 5
ACBH< CF @9GG. +=J9FHCKB AIHC FCID,
989 /F0 +C58, C<96CM;5B, &" 231-
627-6700. KKK.+=J9FAIHC.B9H
2010 C<9JM &5@=6I. 32 &), 1
CKB9F, CB@M 59 $. '=79 75F. ,5@9 )F=79
$11.797. $199 5 ACBH< CF @9GG.
+=J9FHCKB AIHC FCID, 989 /F0
+C58, C<96CM;5B, &" 231-627-6700.
KKK.+=J9FAIHC.B9H
2010 &9F7IFM &=@5B. %95H<9F, ,MB7,
GIBFCC:. ,5@9 )F=79 $11,995.
+=J9FHCKB AIHC FCID, 989 /F0
+C58, C<96CM;5B, &" 231-627-6700.
KKK.+=J9FAIHC.B9H
2011 BI=7? +9;5@ C1%. CA+FA1 1
CKB9F =B C5F6CB B@57?! !95H98 96CBM
@95H<9F, GIBFCC:, 6@I9HCCH<, .@HF5-
,CB=7 )5F?=B; AGG=GH, "BFCH5=BA9BH
F5D<=7 D=GD@5M 5B8 &(+E! $17,949.
D5J9 $F=B; C<9JFC@9H-C58=@@57, 1861
., 31 'CFH<, )9HCG?9M, &" 231-347-
2585.
2011 C<9JM CFIN9 1%-. C<9JFC@9H
CE+-"F"ED 9LH9B898 B9K 75F K5FF5B-
HM & 5 CA+FA1 1 CKB9F! B@I9 HCCH<,
"B:CH5=BA9BH 8=GD@5M, GH99F=B; K<99@
7CBHFC@G. 36 AD; <=;<K5M! $14,949.
D5J9 $F=B; C<9JFC@9H-C58=@@57, 1861
., 31 'CFH<, )9HCG?9M, &" 231-347-
2585.
2011 C<9JM "AD5@5 %-. C<9JFC@9H
CE+-"F"ED ELH9B898 '9K C5F
05FF5BHM =B B@57?! !95H98 %95H<9F,
+9ACH9 ,H5FH, GH99F=B; 7CBHFC@G, %CK
A=@9G 5B8 F958M :CF MCIF 8F=J9K5M.
$14,949. D5J9 $F=B; C<9JFC@9H-
C58=@@57, 1861 ., 31 'CFH<,
)9HCG?9M, &" 231-347-2585.
2011 FCF8 -5IFIG. %C5898, J9FM B=79.
,5@9 )F=79 $13,997. +=J9FHCKB AIHC
FCID, 989 /F0 +C58, C<96CM;5B,
&" 231-627-6700. KKK.+=J9FAIHC.B9H
2013 C<9JM C5DH=J5 ,DCFH %-3.
C<9JFC@9H CE+-"F"ED K5FF5BHM & CA+-
FA1 1 CKB9F! 16.5$ A=@9G! %C5898!
%95H<9F <95H98 G95HG, F95F J=G=CB
75A9F5, GIBFCC:, CD D@5M9F, 899D =B
FI669F! $21,949. D5J9 $F=B;
C<9JFC@9H-C58=@@57, 1861 ., 31
'CFH<, )9HCG?9M, &" 231-347-2585.
2013 C<9JM ,CB=7 %,. ,C 5@ACGH
B9K! #IGH 60 A=@9G! 37 &)!
AIHCA5H=7, C<9JFC@9H &M%=B?, CD,
B@I9HCCH<, 1.8 @=H9F -4 7M@., H=@H 5B8 H9@-
9G7CD=7 GH99F=B; K<99@ 5B8 ACF9!
$16,795. D5J9 $F=B; C<9JFC@9H-
C58=@@57, 1861 ., 31 'CFH<,
)9HCG?9M, &" 231-347-2585.
BAD C+ED"-? '( C+ED"-? %CK K99?-
@M D5MA9BHG 5J5=@56@9 5H -5=@CF98
EBH9FDF=G9G =B )9HCG?9M. C5@@ 231-
347-3332 CF 1-888-774-2264. AG?
56CIH ;I5F5BH998 7F98=H 5DDFCJ5@.
KKK.H5=@CF989BH9FDF=G9G.7CA.
" B.2 CA+,! 0F97?98 CF =B B998 C:
A97<5B=75@ F9D5=F, 1995 5B8 ID.
5M@CF8 5F95. 989-732-9362
CLASSIC AUTO
CA,! F(+ (%D CA+,. )@95G9 8CB'H
G9B8 HC 7FIG<9F. &=7<9@'G CC@@=G=CB &
+9GHCF5H=CB 231-348-7066
CLASSIC AUTO
F(+ ,A%E: 1940 F(+D )"C$.). 231-
348-7066
COMMERCIAL PROPERTY FOR SALE
&(-E% =B &=C, &-33 FFCBH5;9, K=H< 5
4 B98FCCA, 3 B5H< <CIG9. &CH9@ <5G
10 .B=HG 5B8 3 C56=BG CB 1 4 A7F9G.
ELD5BG=CB DCGG=6=@=H=9G. %CB; 9GH56-
@=G<98 6IG=B9GG K=H< GHFCB; F9D95H
6CC?=B;PG. (KB9FPG F9H=F=B;.
$195,000 K=H< )CGG=6@9 %C H9FAG.
989-826-5547
FIREWOOD & WOODSTOVE
B9 EB9F;M "B89D9B89BH K=H< 5B (.--
D((+ 0((D F.+'ACE :FCA C9BHF5@
BC=@9F. !95H 5@@ MCIF 6I=@8=B;G. 25
M95F K5FF5BHM 5J5=@56@9. DCI6@9 %
-57? "B7. 989-733-7651
F"+E0((D, D+2. B. &C9?9. 231-
631-9600
FREE ITEMS
!A/E ,(&E-!"' -( "/E A0A2?
FF99 =H9AG 7@5GG=:=98 58G FIB :F99 C:
7<5F;9 =B H<9 099?@M C<C=79. C5@@
989-732-8160 CF 9-A5=@ MCIF 58 HC
D5J91@099?@MC<C=79.7CA.
FRESH FOOD
$6.99 0A%%E2E &EA%. &CB85M 5@@
85M CB@M 5H C66@9FG C: 5M@CF8, 900
,. (HG9;C, 5M@CF8. 989-732-9005
C(D A%&('D"'E CF 7<=7?9B A5F79@-
@5, $10.99. -FM BFCG B=GHFC, "-75 EL=H
270, 05H9FG. 989-705-1800
GARAGE & YARD SALE
AH F=FGH .B=H98 &9H<C8=GH C<IF7<
FF=85M, ADF=@ 11 :FCA 95A-5DA 5B8
,5HIF85M, ADF=@ 12 :FCA 95A - BCCB.
C@CH<=B; 5B8 5 J5F=9HM C: <CIG9<C@8
=H9AG K=@@ 69 5J5=@56@9 5H 50 79BHG
5B8 $1. F=@@ CB9 65; CB ,5HIF85M :CF
$1 (5 :9K =H9AG ACF9 $). A@@ DFC7998G
GIDDCFH A5BM @C75@ A=GG=CBG GI7< 5G
(HG9;C CCIBHM FCC8 )5BHFM, ,5@J5H=CB
AFAM 5B8 '9K %=:9 )F9;B5B7M
+9GCIF79 C9BH9F 5B8 CH<9FG H<FCI;<-
CIH H<9 KCF@8.
!A/E ,(&E-!"' -( ,E%%? ,9@@ =H
K=H< 5 7@5GG=:=98 58, >IGH $2.00 :CF 10
KCF8G. 0<M 6CH<9F K=H< 5 5F5;9
,5@9? ,9@@ =H H<9 95GM K5M, =B H<9
099?@M C<C=79.
GUNS
A@K5MG 6IM=B; C@8 G5J5;9 F=:@9G 5B8
ACGH 22 F=:@9G, 989-390-1529.
HEALTH
'5HIF5@ +9A98=9G, 5@H9FB5H=J9 A98=-
7=B9, A98=75@ A5F=>I5B5 :57=@=HM.
1349 ,. (HG9;C AJ9., ,I=H9 1,
5M@CF8, @C75H98 =B H<9 )5F?G=89 &=B=
&5@@, KKK.B5HIF5@F9A98=9G420.7CA,
989-748-4420.
HELP WANTED
CCGA9HC@C;=GHG '99898. 09 5F9 @CC?-
=B; :CF D9CD@9 K=H< CC8 5HH=HI89G
H<5H 5F9 K=@@=B; HC @95FB 5B8 ;FCK 5
6IG=B9GG. 09 <5J9 CDDCFHIB=H=9G!
,9B8 F9GIA9 CF 5DD@M K=H<=B HC A$
!5=F ,HI8=C, 250 &9=>9F DF=J9,
5M@CF8, &" 49735. 989-732-1000.
CCBH57H@5?<5=FGHI8=C.7CA
FCF9GH DIB9G #(B FA"+ ,5HIF85M,
ADF=@ 5H< :FCA 105A HC 3DA 5H FCF9GH
DIB9G C@: C@I6 - AF9 MCI CF GCA9-
CB9 MCI ?BCK =BH9F9GH98 =B KCF?=B;
5H 5 HCD 100 ;C@: :57=@=HM? (D9B=B;G
:CF D5FH-H=A9 & :I@@-H=A9 G95GCB5@
DCG=H=CBG =B 5@@ 89D5FHA9BHG. FCF9GH
DIB9G C@: C@I6, 6376 FCF9GH DIB9G
DF=J9, +CG7CAACB, &" 48653
+A2%"' O )5FH -=A9 ,5@9GD9FGCB.
09 DI6@=G< 2 K99?@M B9KGD5D9FG,
-<9 099?@M C<C=79 5B8 H<9
C<5F@9JC=L CCIBHM '9KG. 0CF? MCIF
CKB G7<98I@9. "B89D9B89BH
CCBHF57HCF. F95H CCAA=GG=CB. -<9
69GH 75B8=85H9 K=@@ 69 :F=9B8@M 5B8
9B>CM <9@D=B; @C75@ 6IG=B9GG9G 7F95H9
DF=BH 58J9FH=G=B; HC <9@D H<9A F957<
7CBGIA9FG H<FCI;<CIH 'CFH<9FB
&=7<=;5B K=H< CIF B9KGD5D9FG 5B8
5GGC7=5H98 DFC8I7HG. &IGH <5J9 7CA-
DIH9F, "BH9FB9H 5779GG 5B8 89D9B8-
56@9 HF5BGDCFH5H=CB. E-A5=@ =B:C HC
D5J9 5H (::=79@099?@MC<C=79.7CA.
HELP WANTED
F5M@=B; &5=B ,HF99H &5B5;9F
'99898 -<9 F5M@=B; DDA/&5=B
,HF99H )FC;F5A =G 5779DH=B; 5DD@=75-
H=CBG :CF 5 :I@@-H=A9 &5B5;9F. -<9
&5=B ,HF99H &5B5;9F K=@@ 69 F9GDCB-
G=6@9 :CF 7CCF8=B5H=B; 8CKBHCKB F9J=-
H5@=N5H=CB 57H=J=H=9G :CF H<9 C=HM C:
F5M@=B;, 5 BCFH<9FB &=7<=;5B 7CA-
AIB=HM, IG=B; H<9 &5=B ,HF99H FCIF-
)C=BH ADDFC57<. ADD@=75BHG G<CI@8
<5J9 98I75H=CB 5B8/CF 9LD9F=9B79 =B
CB9 CF ACF9 C: H<9 :C@@CK=B; 5F95G:
7CAA9F7=5@ 8=GHF=7H A5B5;9A9BH,
97CBCA=7 89J9@CDA9BH, :=B5B79,
DI6@=7 F9@5H=CBG, A5F?9H=B;, @5B8 IG9
D@5BB=B;, JC@IBH99F CF BCB-DFC:=H
A5B5;9A9BH, F9H5=@=B;, 5F7<=H97HIF9,
<=GHCF=7 DF9G9FJ5H=CB 5B8/CF GA5@@
6IG=B9GG 89J9@CDA9BH. B57<9@CFPG
89;F99 DF9:9FF98. -<9 &5B5;9F AIGH
69 9BHF9DF9B9IF=5@, 9B9F;9H=7, K9@@
CF;5B=N98 5B8 75D56@9 C: :IB7H=CB=B;
=B 5B =B89D9B89BH 5B8 C:H9B GHF9GG-
:I@ 9BJ=FCBA9BH. EL79@@9BH J9F65@ 5B8
KF=HH9B 7CAAIB=75H=CBG G?=@@G 5F9
9GG9BH=5@. ,5@5FM F5B;9 =G $30,000 -
$35,000 D@IG 69B9:=HG. FI@@ >C6
89G7F=DH=CB 5B8 CH<9F F9GCIF79 A5H9-
F=5@G 5F9 5J5=@56@9 5H KKK.7=HM-
C:;F5M@=B;.CF;. CCAD@9H9 5DD@=75H=CB
D57?5;9 AIGH 69 F979=J98 BC @5H9F
H<5B 5:00DA CB &CB85M, ADF=@ 7,
2014. ,I6A=H F9GIA9, @9HH9F C: =BH9F-
9GH, 5DD@=75H=CB :FCA K96G=H9, G5@5FM
F9EI=F9A9BHG, 5B8 H<F99 F9:9F9B79G
HC F5M@=B; &5=B ,HF99H/C=HM C:
F5M@=B;, 1020 C=HM B@J8, )( BCL 549,
F5M@=B;, &", 49738; CF J=5 9A5=@ HC
&,@7=HMC:;F5M@=B;.CF;.
&57?=B5K (@8 -=A9 )CFHF5=H, @C75H98
=B &57?=B5K C=HM =G @CC?=B; :CF 5B
9B9F;9H=7, :IB @CJ=B; 5B8 CIH ;C=B;
=B8=J=8I5@ :CF 5 GIAA9F G5@9G 5B8
D<CHC;F5D<M DCG=H=CB. AH CIF D<CHC
GHI8=C =B &57?=B5K C=HM, K9 K=@@ HF5=B
MCI =B D<CHC;F5D<M, D<CHC G5@9G 5B8
7CGHIA=B;. -<=G =G 5 ;F95H CDDCFHIB=-
HM :CF 5B =B8=J=8I5@ K<C <5G 5B 9BHF9-
DF9B9IF=5@ GD=F=H 5B8 KCI@8 @=?9 HC
@95FB <CK HC FIB 5 D<CHC;F5D<M GHI-
8=C. 2CI AIGH 69 K=@@=B; HC KCF? K99?-
9B8G, 85MG CF 9J9B=B;G 69;=BB=B;
A=8-&5M 2014. ,9@:- ACH=J5H98 =B8=-
J=8I5@G 5F9 89G=F98 5B8 GCA9 657?-
;FCIB8 =B G5@9G CF D<CHC;F5D<M =G
89G=F56@9. +9BH5@ <CIG=B; 56CJ9 H<9
GHI8=C =G 5J5=@56@9. "BH9F9GH98 =B8=J=8-
I5@G 75B G9B8 H<9=F BCH=79 C: =BH9F9GH
5B8 5 F9GIA9 HC A57?=B5KC@8H=A9-
DCFHF5=H@;[email protected]
'9KG +9DCFH9F O BCMB9 F5@@G O
AHH9B8 5B8 F9DCFH CB @C75@ ;CJ9FB-
A9BH5@ A99H=B;G, G7<CC@ 6C5F8 5B8
@C75@ B9KG F9DCFH=B;. ELD9F=9B798
KF=H9F 5B8 D<CHC;F5D<9F 5 D@IG. &IGH
<5J9 D=;=H5@ 75A9F5 5B8 7CADIH9F. E-
A5=@ =B:C 5B8 G5AD@9G HC D5J9 5H
(::=79@C<5F@9JC=LCCIBHM'9KG.7CA.
)5FH H=A9 >5B=HCF=5@, )9HCG?9M,
$9.25/<F., 75@@ &5F? 989-889-0120.
)5FH--=A9 %"B+A+2 A,,",-A'-. 0CF?
<CIFG 5F9 ,5HIF85M 9 5A HC 1 DA
5B8 ,IB85M 1 DA HC 5 DA. )CG=H=CB
F9EI=F9G 7IGHCA9F G9FJ=79 G?=@@G,
H97<BC@C;M G?=@@G =B7@I8=B; IG=B;
89J=79G, 5B8 GHFCB; 5HH9BH=CB HC
89H5=@ KCF?. D958@=B9 HC 5DD@M =G ADF=@
11, 2014 E(E. 05;9 7CAA9BGIF5H9
K=H< 9LD9F=9B79. ": =BH9F9GH98 9A5=@
@9HH9F C: =BH9F9GH K=H< F9GIA9 HC
8=F@>J8@.=B:C K=H< GI6>97H: +E,.&E.
HELP WANTED
)E-(,$E2 O FI@@ CF )5FH -=A9
,5@9GD9FGCB. 09 DI6@=G< 2 K99?@M
B9KGD5D9FG, -<9 099?@M C<C=79 5B8
H<9 C<5F@9JC=L CCIBHM '9KG. 0CF?
MCIF CKB G7<98I@9. "B89D9B89BH
CCBHF57HCF. F95H CCAA=GG=CB. -<9
69GH 75B8=85H9 K=@@ 69 :F=9B8@M 5B8
9B>CM <9@D=B; @C75@ 6IG=B9GG9G 7F95H9
DF=BH 58J9FH=G=B; HC <9@D H<9A F957<
7CBGIA9FG H<FCI;<CIH 'CFH<9FB
&=7<=;5B K=H< CIF B9KGD5D9FG 5B8
5GGC7=5H98 DFC8I7HG. &IGH <5J9 7CA-
DIH9F, "BH9FB9H 5779GG 5B8 89D9B8-
56@9 HF5BGDCFH5H=CB. E-A5=@ =B:C HC
D5J9 5H (::=79@099?@MC<C=79.7CA.
,DCFHG 0F=H9F O C<96CM;5B 5F95 O
)5FH H=A9 ,DCFHG +9DCFH9F HC 7CJ9F
@C75@ GDCFHG :CF 'CFH<9FB &=7<=;5B'G
@5F;9GH K99?@M B9KGD5D9F.
"B89D9B89BH CCBHF57HCF DCG=H=CB
F9EI=F9G 9LD9F=9B798 KF=H9F 5B8 D<C-
HC;F5D<9F. &IGH <5J9 D=;=H5@ ,%+
75A9F5, 7CADIH9F 5B8 @CJ9 GDCFHG. E-
A5=@ =B:C 5B8 G5AD@9G HC D5J9 5H
(::=79@099?@MC<C=79.7CA.
,DCFHG 0F=H9F O C<96CM;5B 5F95 O
,DCFHG +9DCFH9F HC 7CJ9F @C75@ GDCFHG.
"B89D9B89BH CCBHF57HCF DCG=H=CB
F9EI=F9G 9LD9F=9B798 KF=H9F 5B8 D<C-
HC;F5D<9F. &IGH <5J9 D=;=H5@ ,%+
75A9F5, 7CADIH9F 5B8 @CJ9 GDCFHG. E-
A5=@ =B:C 5B8 G5AD@9G HC D5J9 5H
(::=79@099?@MC<C=79.7CA.
HOMES FOR SALE
09 G9@@ EB9F;M ,H5F AC8I@5F <CA9G,
@9H IG 6I=@8 MCIF B9K <CA9 CF F9D@579
MCIF :=F9 @CGG. ,99 CIF AC89@, ;=J9 IG
5 75@@ :CF 5B 5DDC=BHA9BH. 'CFH<@5B8
!CA9G, 989-370-6058.
HOUSEHOLD
E+-A', D+A)E+"E,: EJ9FMH<=B; =B
0=B8CK -F95HA9BHG FF99 9GH=A5H9G
5B8 =B <CA9 5DDC=BHA9BHG.
EGH56@=G<98 1958. C5@@ 989-732-
3340 CF J=G=H CIF G<CKFCCA 5H 2281
,CIH< (HG9;C AJ9., 5M@CF8.
LAND & PROPERTY
B95IH=:I@ 40 57F9 D5F79@ K=H< <=889B
<5M :=9@8G 5B8 GHCB9 D=@9G, 6CF89F=B;
30,000 B9K@M D@5BH98 +98 )=B9
G998@=B;G. FCF <IBH=B;, :=G<=B;, <=?-
=B;, <CFG9657? F=8=B; CF >IGH 5 :5JCF=H9
;9H5K5M. F=@@98 K=H< 899F 5B8 9@?.
/9FM 7@CG9 HC &I@@9H %5?9 5B8 :989F5@
DFCD9FHM. )FCD9FHM @C75H98 >IGH GCIH<
C: 2634 0<=H=B; +C58, C<96CM;5B.
C5@@ 231-414-0044 :CF =B:C.
$70,000.
BEA/E+ ",%A'D )+()E+-2 F(+
,A%E B2 (0'E+. %5?9 :FCBH DFCD9FHM,
5DDFCL=A5H9@M 30 57F9G, 670' C: @5?9
:FCBH. 05H9F 5B8 9@97HF=7. 09GH G=89 C:
B95J9F "G@5B8, "FCB (F9 B5M. ,9F=CIG
=BEI=F9G CB@M, D@95G9 7CBH57H:
695J9F=G@5B8DFCD@;[email protected] CF 75@@
&5IF99B, 773-580-6986
LEGAL NOTICES
F"'A% '(-"CE -( D",)(,E (F C('-
-E'-, HC G5H=G:M 9GH56@=G<98 @=9BG CB
H<9 :C@@CK=B; GHCF5;9 IB=HG: #I@=9
$I7<5F9?, .B=H 76; %CFF= CF5K@9M, .B=H
85; #9:: (GK5@8, .B=H 31; D5B=9@@9
(F8K5M, .B=H 50; ,5A5BH<5 CFCGG9HH,
.B=H 51. ,HCF5;9 IB=H 7CBH9BHG K=@@ 69
9ADH=98 5B8 CF GC@8 CB ADF=@ 11,
2014 =: 577CIBHG 5F9 BCH D5=8 =B :I@@
5H A), &=B= 05F9<CIG9, 112 E5GH
,=LH< ,H., 5M@CF8, &=7<=;5B 49735
MANUFACTURED HOMES
'E0 & +E)(,: DCI6@9-0=89G, 16'G,
14'G. -5?9 5BMH<=B; CB HF589.
F=B5B7=B; 5J5=@56@9. A 7CAD@9H9 @=B9
C: D5FHG. KKK.A=7<=;5B95GH-
[email protected]. 989-966-2037
MISCELLANEOUS
$3.99 BF95?:5GH; $5.99 %IB7<;
$6.99 D=BB9F. !CA9A589 GD97=5@G
9J9FM 85M CB@M 5H C66@9FG C: 5M@CF8,
900 ,. (HG9;C, 5M@CF8. 989-732-
9005
A--E'-"(' .)!(%,-E+E+,.
+9D@9B=G< MCIF GIDD@=9G 5H H9B M95F
C@8 DF=79G. )@95G9 75@@ +CB :CF 7CA-
D@9H9 @=GH, 231-347-7624
BA+B', !(&E&ADE DE,,E+-,.
-F95H MCIFG9@: HC H<9 69GH 75FFCH 75?9
=B H<9 .,A 5H C66@9FG C: 5M@CF8,
900 ,. (HG9;C, 5M@CF8. 989-732-
9005
B9 MCIFG9@:, BC 5DC@C;=9G. #C=B IG
105A ,IB85M. 1GH CCB;F9;5H=CB5@
C<IF7< .CC, 218 0. 2B8 ,H., 5M@CF8,
989-732-5726. KKK.:=FGHI77;5M-
@CF8.CF;
%(0E,- C(,- "' &"C!"A'! C%A,,"-
F"ED AD, A+E #.,- $2 :CF 5 10-KCF8
58 =B H<9 099?@M C<C=79. -<9 5F95'G
K=89GH 8=GHF=6IH=CB D5D9F 5B8 H<9
@CK9GH 7CGH :CF 58J9FH=G=B;. )@579 58G
CB-@=B9 5H KKK.099?@MC<C=79.7CA CF
75@@ 989-732-8160. D=GHF=6IH98
K99?@M :FCA ,H. ";B579 HC
+CG7CAACB. 'CFH<9FB &=7<=;5B'G
69GH 7<C=79 :CF 6IM=B; 5B8 G9@@=B;.
)A' F+"ED )E+C!, 2 )"ECE %.'C!
F(+ ('%2 $7.99. -FM BFCG B=GHFC, "-75
EL=H 270, 05H9FG. 989-705-1800
+E-"+E&E'- ,A%E - ,HCB9 F5B7=9F
#9K9@FM & B958G =B F5M@=B;
EJ9FMH<=B; 50% C::! CIGHCA >9K9@FM,
6958G C: 5@@ ?=B8G, 6FCC7<9G, 5779G-
GCF=9G. (D9B 10-5 7@CG98 -<IFG85M &
,IB85M 989-889-5019
-.E,DA2 '"!-, A@@ MCI 75B 95H
-IF?9M A95@, CB@M $10. C66@9FG C:
5M@CF8, 900 ,. (HG9;C, 5M@CF8.
989-732-9005
CLASSIFIEDS
Delivered to 40
Towns Each Week!
Run for
As Low
As
$
2
00
CALL: 989.732.8160 | EMAIL: [email protected] | ORDER ONLINE: www.weeklychoice.com
Page 6-B • Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice April 3, 2014
BUY HERE
PAY HERE!!
BAD CREDIT BANKRUPTCY
REPOS OK
Largest seIection of trucks &
SUVs in Northern Michigan!
|e:¡ |erm:, |ew iewr je¡mer|
¥e:| mer|ll¡ je¡mer|: ere trier SZJJ,
Z1 mer|l werrer|¡ ereile|le er ell relitle:.
Ilet:eri: el lejj¡ tt:|emer:
FREE GAS!
CALL RICH! CALL RICH!
989-306-3656
Due to recent expansion in our business, we
are currently accepting applications/resumes
for men or women in our customer service
department.
REQUIREMENTS:
Customer service experience, Able to start
immediately, Business casual dress and have
Reliable transportation.
Call Monday or Tuesday for interview.
989-705-1723
CUSTOMER
SERVICE
1349 S. Otsego,
GayIord, MI 49735
(989) 732-2477
www.SmithReaItyGayIord.com
daIe j. smith
Associate Broker
CRS, RAM, ABR
Wendie Forman
Associate Broker GRI,
Property Manager
Mike Perdue
ReaItor Associate
Expand your business to this heavily traveled, high visibility
location with sprawling frontage on the I-75 Business Loop.
This ideal commercial/industrial building is over 90,000SqFt
and already has many of the features you desire including
large overhead doors, an outdoor fenced-in area, huge stor-
age/stock area, break room, rough of f ice spaces ready for
your f inishing touches, and much more! Also has updated se-
curity and f ire suppression systems installed. Call today to
discuss possible lease terms. $1,750,000
Super value in this prime retail location with high visibil-
ity, high traf f ic and access from S. Wisconsin and S. Illi-
nois. Quality building with open f loor plan and lots of
windows. Additional fully insulated and heated 24x38
work shop. Lots of room with footprint for additional
building(s) if necessary. $249,500
ANNUAL BUDGET OPEN FOR INSPECTION
ON MONDAY, APRIL 1, 2014 THE TOWNSHIPS OF OTSEGO COUNTY ENACTED THE
TOWNSHIP BUDGETS FOR THE 2014 FISCAL YEAR. A SUMMARY OF THE BUDGET
SHOWING ALL USES OF FUNDS IS AVAILABLE FOR PUBLIC INSPECTION AT THE
TOWNSHIP CLERK`S OFFICE ON MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY BY APPOINTMENT.
BAGLEY TWP. JAMES SZYMANSKI CHARLTON TWP. IVAN MASCHKE
CHESTER TWP. MELISSA SZYMANSKI CORWITH TWP. DEBBIE WHITMAN
DOVER TWP. JANET KWAPIS ELMIRA TWP. SUSAN SCHAEDIG
HAYES TWP. RICHARD ROSS LIVINGSTON TWP. ELIZABETH MENCH
OTSEGO LAKE TWP. LORRAINE MARKOVICH
Grayling Main Street
Manager Wanted
The Grayling DDA/Main Street Program is accepting applications for a full-
time Manager. The Main Street Manager will be responsible for coordinat-
ing downtown revitalization activities for the City of Grayling, a northern
Michigan community, using the Main Street Four-Point Approach.
Applicants should have education and/or experience in one or more of the
following areas: commercial district management, economic development,
finance, public relations, marketing, land use planning, volunteer or non-
profit management, retailing, architecture, historic preservation and/or
small business development. Bachelor’s degree preferred. The Manager
must be entrepreneurial, energetic, well organized and capable of function-
ing in an independent and often stressful environment. Excellent verbal
and written communications skills are essential. Salary range is $30,000 -
$35,000 plus benefits. Full job description and other resource materials
are available at www.cityofgrayling.org.
Complete application package must be received no later
than 5:00pm on Monday, April 7, 2014.
Submit resume, letter of interest, application from web-
site, salary requirements, and three references to:
Grayling Main Street/City of Grayling,
1020 City Blvd, PO Box 549, Grayling, MI, 49738;
or via email to
[email protected].
NATIONAL CLASSIFIEDS
9 &"%%"(' C"+C.%A-"(' 57FCGG H<9
..,. 5B8 C5B585 K=H< 5 7@5GG=:=98 58 =B
CIF B5H=CB5@ B9HKCF?, >IGH $695. C5@@
H<9 099?@M C<C=79, 989-732-8160 CF 9-
A5=@ D5J91@099?@MC<C=79.7CA
+9589F A8J=GCFM: H<9 '5H=CB5@ -F589
AGGC7=5H=CB K9 69@CB; HC <5G DIF-
7<5G98 GCA9 7@5GG=:=98G =B CIF
D5D9F. D9H9FA=B=B; H<9 J5@I9 C: H<9=F
G9FJ=79 CF DFC8I7H =G 58J=G98 6M H<=G
DI6@=75H=CB. "B CF89F HC 5JC=8 A=GIB-
89FGH5B8=B;G, GCA9 58J9FH=G9FG 8C
BCH C::9F 9AD@CMA9BH 6IH F5H<9F GID-
D@M H<9 F9589FG K=H< A5BI5@G, 8=F97-
HCF=9G 5B8 CH<9F A5H9F=5@G 89G=;B98
HC <9@D H<9=F 7@=9BHG 9GH56@=G< A5=@
CF89F G9@@=B; 5B8 CH<9F 6IG=B9GG9G 5H
<CA9. .B89F '( 7=F7IAGH5B79
G<CI@8 MCI G9B8 5BM ACB9M =B
58J5B79 CF ;=J9 H<9 7@=9BH MCIF 7<97?-
=B;, @=79BG9 "D, CF 7F98=H 75F8 BIA-
69FG. A@GC 69K5F9 C: 58G H<5H 7@5=A HC
;I5F5BH99 @C5BG F9;5F8@9GG C: 7F98=H
5B8 BCH9 H<5H =: 5 7F98=H F9D5=F 7CA-
D5BM 8C9G 6IG=B9GG CB@M CJ9F H<9
D<CB9 =HPG =@@9;5@ HC F9EI9GH 5BM
ACB9M 69:CF9 89@=J9F=B; =HG G9FJ=79.
A@@ :IB8G 5F9 65G98 =B ., 8C@@5FG.
800 BIA69FG A5M CF A5M BCH F957<
C5B585.
NOTES OF ENCOURAGEMENT
)CG=H=J9 'CH9G C: EB7CIF5;9A9BH 5F9
:F99 =B H<9 099?@M C<C=79. B=FH<85M,
ABB=J9FG5FM, 0988=B;,
CCB;F5HI@5H=CBG CF >IGH 5 )CG=H=J9
'CH9 5@@ 5F9 :F99. E-&5=@ MCIF 'CH9 C:
EB7CIF5;9A9BH HC
(::=79@099?@MC<C=79.7CA
PETS
#.D"E, D( =G CD9B ,5HIF85MG :CF 5@@
MCIF 8C;'G B998G. ,HCD =B :CF '5=@
-F=A, BC 5DDH. B979GG5FM, $8.00.
989-705-1115, 618 09GH &=H7<9@@
,H, 5M@CF8
PRIVATE INVESTIGATOR
)F=J5H9 "BJ9GH=;5HCF, %=79BG98,
BCB898, 75B :=B8 5@ACGH 5BMCB9, @CGH
@CJ9G, 6=C@C;=75@ D5F9BHG, A=GG=B; D9F-
GCBG, 896HCFG, <9=FG. FF99 7CB:=89B-
H=5@ D<CB9 7CBGI@H5H=CBG. 989-731-
1111.
RECREATIONAL VEHICLES
2014 C5H5@=B5 293*BC$ 29' -F5J9@
-F5=@9F. ": MCI 5F9 @CC?=B; :CF 5B
5::CF856@9 @=;<HK9=;<H HF5J9@ HF5=@9F
H<5H 75B G@99D H<9 K<C@9 :5A=@M 5B8
H<9B GCA9 H<9B H<=G =G H<9 IB=H :CF
MCI!!! -<=G IB=H :95HIF9G 5B 9BCFACIG
GID9F G@=89 CIH DF57H=75@@M 8CI6@=B;
H<9 5J5=@56@9 :@CCF GD579 =B H<9 A5=B
@=J=B; 5F95 5B8 7CBH5=BG 5 <I;9 I-
G<5D98 8=B9HH9 5B8 5 DI@@ CIH G@99D9F
GC:5 5@CB; K=H< 9LHF5 CJ9F<958 GHCF-
5;9 7CAD5FHA9BHG. ,5@9 )F=79
$18,995. ,5J9 $9,000. "BH9FB5H=CB5@
+/ 0CF@8, 277 '. ELDF9GGK5M CCIFH,
5M@CF8, &" 49735. 989-448-8700.
!CIFG: &CB85M O ,5HIF85M 95A O
5DA.
RECREATIONAL VEHICLES
2014 $C5@5 26,, 26' -F5J9@ -F5=@9F.
-<=G F95F @=J=B; FCCA GID9F G@=89
AC89@ =G GID9F @=H9 7CBGHFI7H98. AH
CB@M 5200@6G =H 75B 69 HCK98 K=H<
HFI7?G CF :I@@ G=N98 GIJPG K=H< 95G9.
-<9 F95F @=J=B; FCCA :95HIF9 8I5@
7<5=FG 5B8 @5F;9 K=B8CKG. -<9
?=H7<9B C::9FG @CHG C: CJ9FG=N98 756=-
B9HG 5B8 8F5K9FG. -<9 65H< =G GD5-
7=CIG K=H< 5 <I;9 7CFB9F G<CK9F 5B8
H<9 698FCCA <5G 5 G97CB8 9BHFM 5B8
K5F8FC69G CB 9=H<9F G=89 C: H<9 698.
,5@9 )F=79 $23,995. ,5J9 $7,000.
"BH9FB5H=CB5@ +/ 0CF@8, 277 '.
ELDF9GGK5M CCIFH, 5M@CF8, &"
49735. 989-448-8700. !CIFG:
&CB85M O ,5HIF85M 95A O 5DA.
2014 ,?M@=B9 05@?56CIH 23%C 23'
-F5J9@ -F5=@9F. ,MB9F;M @=;<HK9=;<H
7CBGHFI7H=CB, CCF=5B 7CIBH9FHCDG,
<95H98 <C@8=B; H5B?G, G@=89CIH,
DCK9F 5KB=B; 5B8 @CHG ACF9. 09 5F9
9L7=H98 56CIH 588=B; H<=G B9K @=B9-ID
C: 05@?56CIH HF5J9@ HF5=@9FG HC CIF
=BJ9BHCFM. ,5@9 )F=79 $19,995. ,5J9
$8,000. "BH9FB5H=CB5@ +/ 0CF@8, 277
'. ELDF9GGK5M CCIFH, 5M@CF8, &"
49735. 989-448-8700. !CIFG:
&CB85M O ,5HIF85M 95A O 5DA.
2014 -F5=@FIBB9F 26,%E 26' -F5J9@
-F5=@9F, ,ID9F %=H9 E8=H=CB. !95FH@5B8
-F5=@ +IBB9F ,%E BIB?<CIG9 -F5J9@
-F5=@9F K/+95F CCFB9F BIB? B98G,
+95F CCFB9F B5H< "B7@I8=B;:
-I6/,<CK9F, -C=@9H, ,=B? & %=B9B
C56=B9H, ,@=89CIH BCCH< D=B9HH9 &
,C:5 K/(J9F<958 A6CJ9 ,C:5, EBH.
C9BH9F, )5BHFM, +9:F=;9F5HCF, 3 BIFB9F
+5B;9, D6@. $=H7<9B ,=B? & (J9F<958
,HCF5;9, FFCBH *I99B B98 K/,HCF5;9
BCH< ,=89G & (J9F<958 C56=B9H 5B8
&CF9! ,5@9 )F=79 $17,995.
"BH9FB5H=CB5@ +/ 0CF@8, 277 '.
ELDF9GGK5M CCIFH, 5M@CF8, &"
49735. 989-448-8700. !CIFG:
&CB85M O ,5HIF85M 95A O 5DA.
'9K 2013 (IH657? 321-B! -9FF5=B
32' -F5J9@ -F5=@9F. 2013 (IH657?
-9FF5=B 321-B!. -<=G @=;<H K9=;<H @IL-
IFM HF5J9@ HF5=@9F K=@@ G@99D 9 D9CD@9
7CA:CFH56@M 5B8 =H <5G 5@@ H<9 7CB-
J9B=9B79G. "H 7CA9G 9EI=DD98 K=H< 5
/5I@H98 79=@=B;, GH9F9C GMGH9A K=H<
D/D 5B8 B@I9 -CCH<, 3 6IFB9F F5B;9
K=H< CJ9B, 32=B %CD -/, G?M@=;<H =B
65H<, 13.5 5=F, A=7FCK5J9, 6 ;5@ ;5G
9@97HF=7 K5H9F <95H9F K/D,", %5F;9
8CI6@9 8CCF F9:9F, D9@IL9 G@99D9F
GC:5, C<5AD5;B9 :=69F;@5GG, 9@ 7C5H
75D, H=BH98 G5:9HM ;@5GG K=B8CKG, -/
5BH9BB5 K 6CCGH9F, 756@9 5B8 G5H9@-
@=H9 DF9D, CIHG=89 75AD ?=H7<9B, 6@57?
H5B? :@IG<, GD5F9 H=F9 5B8 9J9B 5B
9@97HF=7 5KB=B;. ,5@9 )F=79 $23,995.
,5J9 $12,000. "BH9FB5H=CB5@ +/
0CF@8, 277 '. ELDF9GGK5M CCIFH,
5M@CF8, &" 49735. 989-448-8700.
!CIFG: &CB85M O ,5HIF85M 95A O
5DA.
RECREATIONAL VEHICLES
2014 CC57<A9B FF998CA ELDF9GG
230B! 23' -F5J9@ -F5=@9F. 2014
CC57<A9B 230B!. -<=G 9LHF9A9@M
@=;<H K9=;<H HF5J9@ HF5=@9F =G D9F:97H :CF
5 GA5@@9F HCK J9<=7@9. "H 75B 69 DI@@98
K=H< ACGH 6 7M@=B89F ,./G. "H 7CA9G
9EI=DD98 K=H< 5@IA=BIA F=AG, DCK9F
5KB=B;, 6@57? & H5B 9LH9F=CF 5B8
AI7< ACF9. ,5@9 )F=79 $17,995.
,5J9 $10,000. "BH9FB5H=CB5@ +/
0CF@8, 277 '. ELDF9GGK5M CCIFH,
5M@CF8, &" 49735. 989-448-8700.
!CIFG: &CB85M O ,5HIF85M 95A O
5DA.
RESORT PROPERTY FOR RENT
,A'"BE% !A+B(.+ A'D +E,(+-,
FCFH &M9FG, F@CF=85 @ILIFM 7CB8C CJ9F-
@CC?=B; ,5B C5F@CG B5M. 2 698FCCAG.
'IA9FCIG 5A9B=H=9G 5B8 :=B9 8=B=B;
5H F9GCFH. 989-731-2664.
SERVICES
D#/$A+A($E ,E+/"CE 5J5=@56@9 :CF
K988=B;G, 7@I6G CF D5FH=9G.
+9:9F9B79G 5B8 =B:CFA5H=CB 5H
KKK.@5FFM9BH9FH5=BA9BH.7CA. 989-
732-3933
EFF"C"E'- !EA-"' A'D C((%"'.
FIFB579G, A=F CCB8=H=CB=B;, ,5@9G 5B8
,9FJ=79. *I5@=HM 0CF?A5BG<=D 989-
350-1857
STORAGE
A), &=B=-05F9<CIG9 C: 5M@CF8 <5G
5L10 IB=HG 5J5=@56@9 :CF >IGH $35 5
ACBH<. 'C @CB; H9FA 7CBHF57H B979G-
G5FM. "B HCKB, G5:9 GHCF5;9. %5F;9F
IB=HG 5@GC 5J5=@56@9. C5@@ 989-732-
8160.
!95H98 CF CC@8 GHCF5;9 5J5=@56@9 :CF
0=BH9F, ,DF=B;, ,IAA9F, F5@@, 989-
732-0724
SUV
2002 C58=@@57 EG75@589. %95H<9F, 3F8
FCK G95H, HCK D?;, DCK9F ACCB FCC:
5B8 ACF9. ,5@9 )F=79 $7,997.
+=J9FHCKB AIHC FCID, 989 /F0
+C58, C<96CM;5B, &" 231-627-6700.
KKK.+=J9FAIHC.B9H
2002 FCF8 ELD@CF9F 1%-. 40D, B=79.
AG @CK 5G $159 5 ACBH<. DF=J9 'CK
AIHC ,5@9G, 2215 ., !=;<K5M 31 ',
)9HCG?9M. )<CB9 231-347-3200.
KKK.8F=J9BCK123.7CA
2003 FCF8 ELD@CF9F 1%-. 40D,
@95H<9F, HCK D?;. AG @CK 5G $159 5
ACBH<. DF=J9 'CK AIHC ,5@9G, 2215
., !=;<K5M 31 ', )9HCG?9M. )<CB9
231-347-3200. KKK.8F=J9BCK123.7CA
2005 ,5HIFB /.E A0D. #IGH AFF=J98!
C<=@= D9DD9F F98, H5B @95H<9F G95HG,
,IBFCC:, A@@CMG, 6-8=G7 CD, 25 AD;
<=;<K5M CIH C: 5 250 !) 3.5 @=H9F /6!
)9F:97H 4 G95GCB ,./! $7,949. D5J9
$F=B; C<9JFC@9H-C58=@@57, 1861 ., 31
'CFH<, )9HCG?9M, &" 231-347-2585.
SUV
2005 -CMCH5 !=;<@5B89F. 40D, HCK
D?;, 4 7M@, ;F95H &). ,5@9 )F=79
$9,795. +=J9FHCKB AIHC FCID, 989
/F0 +C58, C<96CM;5B, &" 231-627-
6700. KKK.+=J9FAIHC.B9H
2007 #99D CCAA5B89F ,DCFH. 3F8
FCK G95H, ACCBFCC:, @95H<9F, 96 $.
,5@9 )F=79 $9,895. +=J9FHCKB AIHC
FCID, 989 /F0 +C58, C<96CM;5B,
&" 231-627-6700. KKK.+=J9FAIHC.B9H
2010 BI=7? EB7@5J9 C1 A0D. BI=7?
CE+-"F"ED 9LH9B898 B9K 75F K5FF5B-
HM! +98 >9K9@ K=H< 96CBM 7@CH<, +CCA
:CF 7! 19 5@@CMG, B@I9 -CCH<, 8I5@
9L<5IGH 5B8 ACF9! $21,949. D5J9
$F=B; C<9JFC@9H-C58=@@57, 1861 ., 31
'CFH<, )9HCG?9M, &" 231-347-2585.
2011 C<9JM EEI=BCL. A0D, HCK D?;,
ACCBFCC:, 91 $. ,5@9 )F=79 $16,297.
+=J9FHCKB AIHC FCID, 989 /F0
+C58, C<96CM;5B, &" 231-627-6700.
KKK.+=J9FAIHC.B9H
2011 C<9JM EEI=BCL. B@57? 695IHM.
'=79 ,./. ,5@9 )F=79 $12,997.
+=J9FHCKB AIHC FCID, 989 /F0
+C58, C<96CM;5B, &" 231-627-6700.
KKK.+=J9FAIHC.B9H
TRUCKS
2000 FCF8 +5B;9F 1%-. 40D, 7FI=G9,
5=F, HCK, 119 $. AG @CK 5G $139 5
ACBH<. DF=J9 'CK AIHC ,5@9G, 2215
., !=;<K5M 31 ', )9HCG?9M. )<CB9
231-347-3200. KKK.8F=J9BCK123.7CA
2004 C<9JM CC@CF58C ELH. C56 %,
4L4. CA+FA1 1 CKB9F =B B@57?/B@57?
C@CH<. BF5B8 B9K CCCD9F H=F9G CB
5@@CMG! CD, A=F, F95H A=@95;9 CIH C: 5
2.8 @=H9F 4 7M@, CCA9 7<97? =H CIH!
$9,449. D5J9 $F=B; C<9JFC@9H-
C58=@@57, 1861 ., 31 'CFH<,
)9HCG?9M, &" 231-347-2585.
2006 FCF8 E7CBC@=B9 E-350 ,ID9F
DIHM CIH5K5M /5B. '=79 HFI7? K=H<
%=:H ;5H9, 5=F. (B@M 65 $. ,5@9 )F=79
$9,995. +=J9FHCKB AIHC FCID, 989
/F0 +C58, C<96CM;5B, &" 231-627-
6700. KKK.+=J9FAIHC.B9H
2007 C<9JM ,=@J9F58C %- 4L4 3-71.
'9K AFF=J5@ =B F5MGHCB9 &9H5@@=7!
-<9 6CL @CC?G 65F9@M IG98, 899D =B
FI669F! BF=;<H 18 5@@CMG. 4.8 @=H9F /8.
-5?9 =H :CF 5 F=89! $16,888. D5J9
$F=B; C<9JFC@9H-C58=@@57, 1861 ., 31
'CFH<, )9HCG?9M, &" 231-347-2585.
TRUCKS
2008 C<9JM ,=@J9F58C. 3-71, 4L4,
G95HG 5, 698@=B9F. 79 $. /9FM B=79.
,5@9 )F=79 $18,995. +=J9FHCKB AIHC
FCID, 989 /F0 +C58, C<96CM;5B,
&" 231-627-6700. KKK.+=J9FAIHC.B9H
2008 FCF8 +5B;9F ,ID9F756.
B98@=B9F, 5=F, :C@8 8CKB F95F G95H. AG
@CK 5G $129 5 ACBH<. DF=J9 'CK AIHC
,5@9G, 2215 ., !=;<K5M 31 ',
)9HCG?9M. )<CB9 231-347-3200.
KKK.8F=J9BCK123.7CA
2010 FCF8 +5B;9F. "B8IGHF=5@ 75D,
698@=B9F, @5889F F57?G, HCK D?;,
@95H<9F, B9K H=F9G. ,5@9 )F=79 $9,997.
+=J9FHCKB AIHC FCID, 989 /F0
+C58, C<96CM;5B, &" 231-627-6700.
KKK.+=J9FAIHC.B9H
VANS
2 HC C<CCG9 FFCA O 2012 DC8;9
F5B8 C5F5J5B. 7 D5GG9B;9F, ,HCK-'-
C G95H=B;, 5=F, 7FI=G9. /9FM, J9FM B=79.
-<9 &5FCCB <5G 71 $. -<9 C<5F7C5@
CB9 <5G 61 $. $249 5 ACBH< CF @9GG.
+=J9FHCKB AIHC FCID, 989 /F0
+C58, C<96CM;5B, &" 231-627-6700.
KKK.+=J9FAIHC.B9H
2000 FCF8 E7CBC@=B9 E-350 ,ID9F
DIHM :I@@ G=N9 J5B. F95H G<5D9, G95HG
7. ,5@9 )F=79 $5,995. $199 5 ACBH<
CF @9GG. +=J9FHCKB AIHC FCID, 989
/F0 +C58, C<96CM;5B, &" 231-627-
6700. KKK.+=J9FAIHC.B9H
2005 !CB85 (8MGG9M. -CIF=B; D?;,
@95H<9F, <95H98 G95HG, @C5898. AG @CK
5G $179 5 ACBH<. DF=J9 'CK AIHC
,5@9G, 2215 ., !=;<K5M 31 ',
)9HCG?9M. )<CB9 231-347-3200.
KKK.8F=J9BCK123.7CA
2008 DC8;9 F5B8 C5F5J5B C//
C5F;C J5B. A=F, 7FI=G9, 103 $. AG @CK
5G $199 5 ACBH<. DF=J9 'CK AIHC
,5@9G, 2215 ., !=;<K5M 31 ',
)9HCG?9M. )<CB9 231-347-3200.
KKK.8F=J9BCK123.7CA
2009 DC8;9 F5B8 C5F5J5B C//
75F;C J5B. DI5@ G@=8=B; 8CCFG,
G<9@J9G, @C7? 6CL, 81 $. ,5@9 )F=79
$9,495. $199 5 ACBH< CF @9GG.
+=J9FHCKB AIHC FCID, 989 /F0
+C58, C<96CM;5B, &" 231-627-6700.
KKK.+=J9FAIHC.B9H
VANS
2011 DC8;9 F5B8 C5F5J5B. ,HCK-B-
C, 4 75DH5=B 7<5=FG, G95HG 7, GH99F-
=B; K<99@ 7CBHFC@. (B@M 63 $. AG @CK
5G $249 5 ACBH<. DF=J9 'CK AIHC
,5@9G, 2215 ., !=;<K5M 31 ',
)9HCG?9M. )<CB9 231-347-3200.
KKK.8F=J9BCK123.7CA
2012 DC8;9 F5B8 C5F5J5B. 7 D5G-
G9B;9F, ,HCK-'-C G95H=B;, 5=F,
7FI=G9, 71 $. /9FM, J9FM B=79. $249 5
ACBH< CF @9GG. +=J9FHCKB AIHC FCID,
989 /F0 +C58, C<96CM;5B, &" 231-
627-6700. KKK.+=J9FAIHC.B9H
2013 C<9JM ELDF9GG 2500. C5F;C
/5B, C<9JFC@9H CE+-"F"ED 9LH9B898
K5FF5BHM. ,IAA=H 0<=H9 CA+FA1 1
CKB9F! AIHC, 5=F 7CB8=H=CB=B;, F95H
G5@9 DF=79. $23,949. D5J9 $F=B;
C<9JFC@9H-C58=@@57, 1861 ., 31
'CFH<, )9HCG?9M, &" 231-347-2585.
WANTED
05BH98: (.-B(A+D &(-(+,, 5BM
G=N9, FIBB=B; CF BCH. A@GC G9@@=B;
(IH6C5F8 &CHCFG. C5@@ 231-546-
6000
April 3, 2014 Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice • Page 7-B
CLASSIFIEDS
Delivered to 40
Towns Each Week!
Run for
As Low
As
$
2
00
CALL: 989.732.8160 | EMAIL: [email protected] | ORDER ONLINE: www.weeklychoice.com
1 MILE NORTH ON OLD 27
GAYLORD
989.732.5136
HOURS: MONDAY-FRIDAY 7:30AM TO 5:30PM;
SATURDAY 8AM TO 2PM; CLOSED SUNDAY
PRO-Build
As Low as
$
0 Down
ACCESS TO OVER 100 VEHICLES
A|| \e||c|eº Sale|] lrºpec|ed ard warrar|ed
BUY HERE
PAY HERE
Bankruptcy, Repos, Bad Credit OK!
CALL RANDY: 231-548-2192
ONLINE APPLICATION AT
HOODSUSEDCARS.COM
Page 8-B • Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in the Weekly Choice April 3, 2014
By Jim Akans
This charming and spacious Grayling area
ranch has undergone so many updates and
renovations in recent years that it is basically
more new than old!
With a whopping 1,888 square feet of living
space on the main level, this three-bedroom,
two-bath home has plenty of room for the
growing family to enjoy along with the many
amenities the home offers. Highlights include
central air conditioning, Pergo flooring and
luxuriously plush carpeting, jetted tub in the
master suite, covered front porch and open
rear deck, two-car garage AND storage shed,
fenced back yard and more.
This home is “clean as a whistle” and ready
to move into and start enjoying right away.
Recently, the seller of this home invested over
$7,000 in new kitchen cabinets as well new
flooring. Other updates and renovations to
the home have included two additions within
the last 10 years, plus a new roof, water
heater, windows, flooring and maintenance-
free vinyl siding.
This spacious and thoroughly updated
Grayling area ranch home has recently under-
gone a reduction in the asking price, and is
now listed at just $108,500. Call Brian
Jergenson today for a private showing. (989)
732-1707 or email
[email protected].
weeklychoice
.com
www.NorthernRealEstate.com
Office: 989-732-1707 Toll Free: 800-828-9372
1738 S. Otsego Ave., P.O. Box 641 Gaylord, MI 49735
LEVEL 2.5 ACRE PARCEL
With good mix of trees, paved road
access, electric adjacent and state land
across road.
$17,900MLS #280761
25K PRICE REDUCTION!
Peaceful Up North Custom Built 3 Bed, 3
Bath Home on 10 Wooded Acres. Private
Setting Flourishing with Wildlife (see Elk-
Deer in back yard). New Maple Flooring,
Field Stone Fireplace,T&G Vaulted Ceiling,
Built In Appliances,Wet Bar, Jet Tub, Sauna.
Large Deck, Naturally Landscaped, 2 1/2
Car Attached Garage, Car Port and
Additional 24x24 Out Building. Close to
Gaylord, Petoskey, Boyne Falls.
$310,000MLS #280633
OLDY BUT A GOODY.
3 Bed, 1 Bath usable Cabin with 2 addition-
al fixer upper cabins for the do-it-your-self-
er.Another shed and garage currently used
for wood storage.All on 1.7 acres within a
1/2 mile of Big Bear Lake.
$43,900MLS #287342
PRICE REDUCTION...
For More Than 300 Feet of Frontage on
Outstanding Fishing Traverse Lake. Private
Lake with No Access to Lake Unless You
Own Property...Here's Opportunity to
Own! Docs on File from Health Dept
Indicate this is Buildable Lot.
$20,000MLS #285316
Feature Home
On the Market
6355 Atkinson Road, Grayling
Listed by Brian Jergenson of Keith Dressel Realty (KDR) (989) 732-1707
Price reduction on
spacious Grayling area ranch home
featuring numerous recent updates
Real Estate
Why Isn’t My
Home
Selling?
Compliments
of
Ed Wohlfiel
Part 2 of 3
Price based on greed
Even if it’s been shown that
your house will likely sell for
around $250,000, you insist on
listing it for $275,000 because
“you never know, someone
could come along who just has
to have it. Besides, if we don’t get
any bites we can always lower
the price later.” The problem is it
won’t take long for buyers to
realize your price is unrealistic
and think you are, too, and won’t
want to deal with you unless the
house is “a steal.” The listing lan-
guishes, so you drop the price,
but not enough, it sits even
longer and pretty soon you have
a listing that’s been on the mar-
ket so long buyers decide there
is something wrong and steer
clear.
The solution is to get the price
right. This is done by using what
is called a Competitive Market
Analysis (CMA). If you’ve hired
the right agent, this is the first
folder out of their briefcase
when you meet to list your
home. A CMA breaks down the
sales price of homes that are
similar to yours in location, size,
age and condition.
Your agent will also consider
the listing prices of homes on
the market, but these are used
more to identify the competi-
tion. Even with a strong agent
and CMA, your price may not be
on target. That’s because the
market is always changing and
your agent should be updating
your CMA whenever anything
comparable to your property
sells.
Not every reason your home
isn’t selling will be the price,
although they will be related to
it. Here we have that value vs.
price issue. If buyers perceive
imperfections in your listing,
they will want a discount, so if
they’re not buying, your price is
not discounted enough for buy-
ers to believe the value to them
at least equals that of your price.
For example, if your lawn is
brown and the landscaping
worn, buyers will want a dis-
count. The problem is that a sell-
er will not consider this a major
issue and attach a much lower
discount than a buyer will
accept.
This is why it is imperative
that sellers do everything they
can to eliminate any issues buy-
ers may have with their house
before listing. Obviously, you
can’t do anything about a bad
location, such as being near rail-
road tracks, or that you have just
one bathroom. But you and your
agent should have factored these
drawbacks into the listing price.

Sponsor Documents

Or use your account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Forgot your password?

Or register your new account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Lost your password? Please enter your email address. You will receive a link to create a new password.

Back to log-in

Close