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By NORA CARNEVALE
The Sun
Many West Windsor area art
enthusiasts were feeling blue on
Jan. 12, but for an exciting cause –
supporting local art.
Artists from West Windsor and
surrounding towns, as well as
members of the community, gath-
ered for the reception of the West
Windsor Arts Council’s latest ju-
ried member exhibit entitled
“Out of the Blue.” The West
Windsor Arts Center was packed
with onlookers taking in each
piece and evaluating how they be-
lieved it fit the all-encompassing
blue theme.
Each artist featured in the ex-
hibit is a member of the West
Windsor Arts Council and sub-
mitted work in response to a blue
theme. The volunteer exhibit
committee is responsible for the
theme selection, which encour-
aged artists to submit work that
was not a literal representation of
the title. After the call to artists
was sent for submissions for the
event, more than 105 submissions
were received from 50 different
artists. The exhibit currently dis-
plays 44 works of art from 39 dif-
ferent local artists.
“Out of the Blue” was juried by
Eric Drotch, who currently teach-
es a wide array of courses in the
visual arts department at The
Peddie School, where he also
manages the Marlboe Gallery.
Drotch has exhibited drawings
and paintings regionally and na-
tionally, and has twice been a resi-
dent at the Vermont Studio Cen-
ter. Also a recent part of the Ful-
bright Distinguished Awards in
Teaching Program, he most re-
cently spent several months in Is-
rael researching art education.
“It is events like these that
make it clear why an arts center
is so needed for communities like
this,” Drotch said.
The work on display ranged
from digital photography, paint-
ing, mixed media, collage and
Chinese brush painting. Since
members of the arts council were
challenged to create a representa-
tion of blue that could be mono-
chromatic or a suggestion of blue
but not in a literal manner, the
Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-11
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Bridgegate scandal
County prosecutor may review
charges against Wildstein. PAGE 5
www.westwindsorsun.com
JANUARY 22–28, 2014
FREE
NORA CARNEVALE/The Sun
Artist Andrew Werth of Princeton Junction discusses his featured pieces ‘Center of Narrative Gravity #15’ acrylic on panel and ‘Idea Forma-
tion’ acrylic on aluminum panel at the West Windsor Arts Center’s ‘Out of the Blue’ exhibit reception on Jan. 12.
‘Out of the Blue’ and into the art gallery
Art exhibit
showcases
local talent
please see WORK, page 4
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gallery is filled with many ex-
tremely different interpretations
of the theme.
“I tried to include some works
that were more straightforward
in their interpretations and some
that were not as obvious,” Drotch
said.
The artists each had an oppor-
tunity to speak about their work
and personal connections to the
theme, but above all, many of the
artists expressed gratitude to the
West Windsor Arts Center for al-
lowing them to display their
work, take classes or simply ex-
press themselves.
“The exhibition provides our
members with an opportunity to
showcase their talent while sup-
porting the art center through
memberships,” Karen Schoenitz,
chair of the exhibit, said.
Some arts council members’
pieces were purchased through-
out the evening, and many are
still available for purchase at the
gallery for residents looking to
support local art. Additionally,
the center offers a variety of
adult and children’s winter art
classes that are still available for
registration.
The work will be displayed
until Feb. 28. Gallery hours are
Monday through Friday from
noon to 6 p.m. and Saturday from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
WORK
Continued from page 1
NORA CARNEVALE/The Sun
Residents of West Windsor enjoy the featured work of local artists at
the reception for the West Windsor Arts Council’s ‘Out of the Blue’
exhibit on Jan. 12.
Work on display through Feb. 28
JANUARY 22–28, 2014 – THE WEST WINDSOR SUN 5
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By KATIE MORGAN
The Sun
David Wildstein, a former Port
Authority executive appointed by
Gov. Christie, may face contempt
charges in the wake of the
Bridgegate scandal.
Wildstein appeared before the
Assembly transportation commit-
tee under subpoena on Jan. 9, but
on the advice of his lawyer, Wild-
stein invoked his Fifth Amend-
ment rights and refused to an-
swer any questions.
Assemblyman John Wisniews-
ki, who is heading the investiga-
tion, said on Jan. 13 that he asked
Mercer County Prosecutor
Joseph Bocchini Jr. to review the
contempt charges brought
against Wildstein.
The charges were brought
under a state statute that says
that refusing to answer questions
after waiving your constitutional
right to remain silent is a misde-
meanor.
Wisniewski believes Wildstein
waived that right when he sup-
plied the Assembly with text and
email transcripts that revealed
the sudden closure of lanes on the
George Washington Bridge in
September may have been politi-
cal retribution against the mayor
of Fort Lee, who did not endorse
Christie in the 2013 election.
Top Christie aide Bridget Anne
Kelly orchestrated the closures
with the help of Wildstein and
Bill Baroni, another Port Author-
ity executive appointed by
Christie, officials said.
Kelly was fired when the scan-
dal broke on Jan. 9, and Wildstein
and Baroni resigned in December.
While the Assembly’s investi-
gation is ongoing, Wisniewski
said in a release that he believes
Wildstein should be charged for
impeding the investigation.
“The committee unanimously
believes that Mr. Wildstein’s ob-
fuscation of our investigation
rises to the level of contempt
under existing state statutes,”
Wisniewski said in the release.
“I’m hopeful that the Mercer
County prosecutor will see it fit to
take up this matter in an effort to
aid our quest to protect taxpayer
resources from further abuse.”
County prosecutor may review charges
against former Port Authority executive
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6 THE WEST WINDSOR SUN — JANUARY 22–28, 2014
1330 Route 206, Suite 211
Skillman, NJ 08558
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 1330 Route 206, Suite 211,
Skillman, NJ 08558. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08550 ZIP code.
If you are not on the mailing list, six-month
subscriptions are available for $39.99. PDFs
of the publication are online, free of charge.
For information, please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
[email protected]. For advertis-
ing information, call 609-751-0245 or
email [email protected].
The Sun welcomes suggestions and com-
ments from readers – including any infor-
mation about errors that may call for a cor-
rection to be printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to [email protected], via fax at
609-751-0245, or via the mail. You can drop
them off at our office, too.
The Sun reserves the right to reprint your
letter in any medium – including electroni-
cally.
Dan McDonough Jr.
CHAIRMAN OF ELAUWIT MEDIA
MANAGING EDITOR Mary L. Serkalow
CONTENT EDITOR Kristen Dowd
WEST WINDSOR EDITOR Nora Carnevale
ART DIRECTOR Stephanie Lippincott
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
PUBLISHER EMERITUS Steve Miller
EDITOR EMERITUS Alan Bauer
Tim Ronaldson
EXECUTIVE EDITOR
Joe Eisele
INTERIMPUBLISHER
A
tlantic City has been a hub of
economic development for
New Jersey since the 1970s.
The city’s casinos have long been the
state’s defining attraction to out-of-
state guests, even more so than its ex-
pansive beaches, which are a huge
summertime draw.
AC has been a focal point of develop-
ment, tourism and marketing, and has
generously repaid the favor in the
form of revenue and taxes to the state.
But a disturbing trend that began al-
most 10 years ago continues today: Peo-
ple are spending less and less money at
Atlantic City casinos every day.
The Center for Gaming Research at
UNLV reports that, since 2006, total
revenue at Atlantic City casinos has
dropped a whopping 45 percent. Casi-
nos brought in $2.9 billion last year,
down from $3.1 billion in 2012 – the sev-
enth straight year that revenue num-
bers were down from the year before.
In the wake of surrounding states
approving expanded gambling offer-
ings at racetracks and standalone casi-
nos, New Jersey no longer has the East
Coast monopoly on gambling that it
had even 10 years ago. No longer do
gamblers have to choose between New
Jersey, Las Vegas and, to a small de-
gree, Connecticut; they can now stay
closer to home in Pennsylvania,
Delaware and even Maryland to place
a bet.
Gov. Christie and other legislators
have recognized this alarming trend
and have focused their efforts on alter-
native forms of gambling to pump fuel
into Atlantic City’s fire. Online gam-
bling began Nov. 21 – with casinos re-
porting $8.4 million in related revenue
since that time – and the push for le-
galized sports betting continues.
But other surrounding states are al-
ready following suit in their own push
for online gambling, and New Jersey’s
case for legalizing sports gambling in
the state doesn’t look promising.
So it seems about time to look else-
where – outside of gambling as a fu-
ture source of significant revenue for
the state.
If Atlantic City casinos continue to
lose revenue, and if online gambling
doesn’t make up those losses, then the
state as a whole will suffer.
What else is out there? What else is
available? What else can attract
tourists all year round?
It might not be possible to answer
these questions now, but lawmakers
need to recognize the need to come up
with a revenue solution soon. Our
state’s long-term economic health
could depend upon it.
in our opinion
A gambling alternative?
New Jersey needs to find a new source of revenue, not a new form of gambling
Your thoughts
Should New Jersey’s tourism industry
continue to rely so heavily on gambling?
Or should the state search for alternative
revenue? Share your thoughts on
the subject, and others, through a letter
to the editor.
The Gallery at Mercer County Commu-
nity College hosts “Left of Central: Later
20th Century Visual Arts in the Capital
City,” an exhibit featuring works by pio-
neering artists from the Trenton Artists
Workshop Association. The exhibit runs
from Tuesday, Jan. 21 to Thursday, Feb. 20.
An opening reception takes place on Satur-
day, Jan. 25 from noon to 2 p.m. A panel dis-
cussion and conversation about the visual
arts in Trenton from 1979 to 1999 will be
held Wednesday, Feb. 12 at 7 p.m.
The MCCC Gallery is located on the sec-
ond floor of the Communication Building
on Mercer's West Windsor campus, 1200
Old Trenton Road.
The exhibit, curated by Leipzig and Tri-
cia Fagan, recent past director of the
Gallery, uses 59 featured artists to explore
seminal events in the founding and evolu-
tion of TAWA, including its early relation-
ship with MCCC and the early days of the
Princeton Art Association’s (now ART-
WORKS) move to the city. Artists who
have played a leading role in the progres-
sion of Trenton’s arts scene from the late
1970s through the present day are featured.
The exhibit will also feature several of
artist Judy Brodsky’s original videos from
the historic 1991 TAWA/Soviet artists’ ex-
change.
The MCCC Gallery is one of five venues
around the region participating in the year-
long exhibit series entitled “Concentric
Circles of Influence: The Birth of Artists’
Communities in Central New Jersey,” or-
ganized by Ilene Dube and Kate Somers. In
addition to art exhibits, the series includes
films, gallery talks and panel discussions
that focus on notable art communities that
developed in central New Jersey beginning
in the late 1930s. Other groups being ex-
plored are the original Queenston Press
artists, the artists of Roosevelt, MOVIS,
and Princeton Artists Alliance.
Gallery hours for this show are Mon-
days, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Tuesdays, 11 a.m. to
7 p.m., Wednesdays, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and
Thursdays, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Additional in-
formation is available at www.mccc.edu/
gallery.
MCCC Gallery to host ‘Left of Central’ art exhibit
JANUARY 22–28, 2014 – THE WEST WINDSOR SUN 7
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Poking fun at theater and the-
ater people has become a popular
subgenre that winks and nods
straight to the funny bone. For
one weekend only, M & M Stage
Productions presents theater par-
ody at its best at Mercer County
Community College’s Kelsey The-
atre with Lawrence Casler’s “A
Night in the Theatre” and
Christopher Durang’s “The
Actor’s Nightmare.” These de-
lightful one-acts will be per-
formed Friday and Saturday, Jan.
24 and 25 at 8 p.m., and Sunday,
Jan. 26 at 2 p.m. Kelsey Theatre is
located on the college’s West
Windsor Campus, 1200 Old Tren-
ton Road. A reception with the
cast and crew follows the opening
night performance on Jan. 24.
“A Night at the Theatre” fea-
tures two couples who are at the
theater for their weekly dose of
culture, this time in the form of
Shakespeare’s “Hamlet.” What
ensues between Margaret and
Stanley (Jennifer Nasta Zefulte
and Peter Bisgaier) and Donna
and Walter (Diana Maurer and
Dave Christopherson) is theatrics
of a different sort, as they chatter
incessantly about themselves,
their children, dead friends,
hunger – and even occasionally
Hamlet. Secrets emerge and
friendships unravel. Audience
members will join in the joke as
they recognize these obnoxious
theatergoers as the people who
sometimes sit behind them!
In “The Actor’s Nightmare,” an
accountant (Tim Moran) wanders
on stage, where he is confronted
by Meg (Morgan O’Neil Petronis),
the stage manager. She informs
him that he is the understudy for
the lead actor and that he must
perform in the lead’s stead. Inex-
plicably, he is referred to as
"George" and “Stanley” through-
out the play, despite his feeling
that neither one is his name.
Adding to the strangeness, he
cannot remember attending any
rehearsals or, in fact, being an
actor at all.
And no one will tell him the
name of the play! One actor,
Sarah (Gina Rose Tiso), tells him
that it is a Noël Coward play,
while another actor, Ellen (Nasta
Zefulte), tells him it’s a play by
Samuel Beckett. A third actor,
Henry (Dave Christopherson),
reads from “Hamlet.” Literally
shoved on stage, George tries to
improvise his lines, but the plot
keeps shifting between the plays
as he finally learns that his role is
that of Sir Thomas More – and
the execution scene seems a bit
too real for his liking. He tries to
convince himself that he is mere-
ly in a dream…but is he?
The appealing ensemble cast
includes Bisgaier, Christoferson,
Chuck Denk, Maurer, Moran,
O’Neil Petronis, Josh Stanlaw,
Rose Tiso and Nasta Zefulte. Mike
DiIorio is the director for “A
Night at the Theatre” and Dan
Spalluto directs “The Actor’s
Nightmare.” The show is pro-
duced by Mike Almstedt and DiIo-
rio. Lighting design is by M. Kitty
Getlik; sound design is by Almst-
edt; and costumes are by Ellery-
Jane Rodger-Ring.
Tickets are $18 for adults, $16
for seniors, and $14 for students
and children and are available on-
line at www.kelseytheatre.net or
by calling the box office at (609)
570-3333.
Kelsey Theatre is wheelchair
accessible, with free parking
available next to the theater.
Special to The Sun
Featured in a night of one-acts presented by M &M Stage Produc-
tions are: front from left, Tim Moran, Morgan O'Neil Petronis, Gina
Rose Tiso and Charles Denk; back from left, Jennifer Nasta Zefulte,
Diana Maurer, Dave Christofferson and Peter Bisgaier.
M&M Stage Productions spoofs theater
and its fans Jan. 24-26 at Kelsey Theatre
Mayor Shing-Fu Hsueh recent-
ly announced that free tax assis-
tance will be offered at the West
Windsor Senior Center for low
and moderate income.
Expertly trained volunteers
from the American Association of
Retired Persons will assist in the
preparation of the federal and
state income tax returns free of
charge. These volunteers are
trained in cooperation with the
IRS and state Income Tax Depart-
ment. Personal assistance will be
provided to help the taxpayer
complete federal and state tax re-
turns.
The Income Tax Assistance
Program will be available at the
West Windsor Senior Center, 271
Clarksville Road, on Tuesdays
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. starting Feb.
4 through April 15. Individuals
are reminded to bring copies of
2012 federal and state income tax
returns as well as the 2013 infor-
mation necessary to complete the
2013 tax returns (i.e. W-2 and 1099
income forms, property tax bills,
itemized deductions, etc.).
Appointments can be sched-
uled by calling the senior center
at (609) 799-9068.
Free tax assistance offered at senior center
Email us at [email protected]
THURSDAY JAN. 23
Picture Books & Craft: Ages 3 to 5.
10:30 to 11 a.m. at West Windsor
Branch Library. Stories, finger
plays, clothesline rhymes and
music followed by a craft. No reg-
istration required.
D.I.Y. Art: Ages 6 to 11 years. 4;30
p.m. to 5:15 p.m. at the West
Windsor Branch Library. Weekly
art program geared to stimulate
your child's independent creativi-
ty. To achieve this goal, children
will pick the medium of their
choice (paint, markers, collage,
etc.) to create art. The librarian
will provide assistance and
instruction as necessary.
FRIDAY JAN. 24
Sing and Play: All ages. 10:30 a.m.
to 11 a.m. at the West Windsor
Branch Library. Join us for a sing-
along program with guitar and
CD music. Action songs, finger
plays and musical instruments
encourage audience participa-
tion.
Walk-In Craft: 10:30 a.m. to 11:45
a.m. at the West Windsor Branch
Library. This is a self-directed
craft activity for children of all
ages. No staff will be present for
this program, so a caregiver must
be present to supervise the child.
SATURDAY JAN. 25
“Left of Central” Opening Recep-
tion: Noon to 3 p.m. at The
Gallery at Mercer County Com-
munity College. An exhibit featur-
ing works by pioneering artists
from the Trenton Artists Work-
shop Association.
Lunar New Year Celebration: All
ages. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the West
Windsor Branch Library. Enjoy
traditional Chinese music and
dance. Crafts and games will
entertain the whole family. Watch
Chinese brush painting and callig-
raphy demonstrations. Refresh-
ments will be served.
SUNDAY JAN. 26
Comics Workshop: Ages 7 to 11
years. 1:15 p.m. to 2:45 p.m. at the
West Windsor Branch Library.
First of an 11-session program.
Must be present at this event to
register and be caught up with
subsequent programs. Workshop
to teach and reinforce writing
and scripting stories, grammar,
research and formatting. Learn
about self-publishing and ulti-
mately complete a compiled zine-
formatted anthology.
Chess Class: Ages 6 to 9 years. 3
p.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the West
Windsor Branch Library. This
chess class is designed for begin-
ning to advanced chess players
ages 6 to 9 years. The children
will learn tactics and strategy,
and will also have time to play
each other. Participants must
bring their own chess set, online
registration required.
MONDAY JAN. 27
Books & Babies: Ages newborn to 2.
10:30 to 11 a.m. at West Windsor
Branch Library. Songs, rhymes,
movement and simple stories.
One-on-one with child; each child
must be accompanied by adult.
No registration required.
Alphabet Time: Ages 3 to 6. 6 to
6:45 p.m. at West Windsor
Branch Library. Each week focus-
es on one letter. Stories, songs
and letter-related craft. Space is
limited. Registration required.
Teen Volunteer Orientation and
Training: 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
at the West Windsor Branch
library. For volunteers scheduled
this school year, a mandatory ori-
entation and training session to
outline expectations. Final ses-
sion offered for this school year.
TUESDAY JAN. 28
Weird Science: Ages 5 to 8 years.
4:30 p.m. to 5:15 p.m. at the West
Windsor Branch Library. Learn
about select scientific topics
ranging from biology to astro-
physics. Children will listen to
information from books and news
articles, and then they will reflect
their knowledge by making art,
craft or an experiment. Parents
may have to provide guidance for
children.
Retirement and Estate Planning: 7
p.m. to 8 p.m. at the West Wind-
sor Branch Library. This seminar
will discuss ways to increase the
probability of achieving invest-
ment success. Strategies
revealed about how to protect
your assets, accumulate and dis-
tribute money for retirement, tax
efficient ways to pass on money,
and other valuable insights. Reg-
istration recommended, call 609-
275-8901.
CALENDAR PAGE 8 JANUARY 22–28, 2014
WANT TO BE LISTED?
Send information by mail to: Calendar, The Sun, 1330 Route 206,
Suite 211, Skillman, NJ 08558. Or by email: news@westwindsor
sun.com. Or you can submit a calendar listing through our website
(www.westwindsorsun.com).
HeIp Wanted
MARKETING REP
New wireless company.
Full or part time. Unlimited income.
See our website for details.
www.getfreeceIIservicenow.com
856-524-2814
Concrete Masonry
Ocean City New Jersey’s #1 Real Estate Team!
The Team You Can Trust!
Matt Bader
Cell 609-992-4380
Dale Collins
Cell 609-548-1539
Let the Bader-Collins Associates make all of your Ocean City
dreams come true! If you are thinking about BUYING, SELLING or
RENTING, contact us for exceptional service and professionalism.
3160 Asbury Avenue • Ocean City, NJ 08226
Office: 609-399-0076 email: [email protected]
Captured by the beauty of this home,
this 5 bedroom 4 1/2 bath single family
corner truly leaves nothing to be
desired. Amenities feature 2,572 sq.
feet of living space, professional
landscaping, vinyl fenced in yard built
on a 55x90 ft lot. The home is equipped
with three car garage, multiple decks
including roof-top deck, ocean views,
custom interior design with too many
upgrades to list, oversized storage
facility and so much more. Used as
a second home only, this property
stands above the rest!
$999,900
2861 WEST AVE
classified
T HE   WE S T WI N DS O R   S U N
JANUARY 22-28, 2014 PAGE 10
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. • Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 • Add color to any box ad for $20. • Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. • Your Classified ad will run in all 5 of The Sun newspapers each week! • Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. • No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE
ADS
Only
$
20per week
H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: [email protected]
Hopewell Sun • Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun • Princeton Sun
West Windsor Sun
BOX
ADS Only
$
25per week List a text-only ad for your yard
sale, job posting or merchandise.
CIeaning
MiIa's CIeaning Service
Reliable, Affordable
Free estimates
Call Mila
609-620-0849
Email:
[email protected]
Dog Boarding
In A Loving Home…
NOT A KENNEL!
Call Steven:
856-356-2775
www.
OUR HOME
DOG BOARDING.com
Your Dog
1oo pooped 1o scoop?
We provide weekly scooper service s1or1ing o1
$
I3/week
saving our planet, one pile at a time
856-665-6769
www.alldogspoop.com
GET $10.00 OFF YOUR FIRST SERVICE!
Locally owned and operated.
Pet Care
CARTWELLS
FOOD SERVICE
IN MONTGOMERY TOWNSHIP
HIRING FOOD SERVICE
WORKERS PART TIME.
Apply in person at
MONTGOMERY
HIGH SCHOOL
1016 Route 601 Skillman NJ
or CALL 609-466-7602
ext 6510 ask for Pat K.
EOE/Affirmative Action
Employer M/F/D/V
Furniture For SaIe
FURNITURE FOR SALE
BeautifuI 3 Year OId Leather
Sofa Living Room Set
Includes love seat & recliner.
LIGHT BEIGE
LIKE NEW $1200
[email protected]
609-737-7401
Place your
classified today!
609-751-0245
CLASSIFIED
JANUARY 22-28, 2014 - THE WEST WINDSOR SUN 11
If you’re reading your
competitor’s ad?
Who’s making money…
YOU OR THEM?
Advertise with us!
Special Classified offers available.
Don’t delay! Call today!
(856) 427-0933
INTO ACTION!
(609) 751-0245
Considering a home
in South Florida?
Whether you're considering a move
to a better climate, or just a second
home, or investment property, Rena
Kliot of Pulse International Realty is
the broker for buyers who want a
dependable expert in the exciting
South Florida market.
Call today to start your search
for that coastal home!
Rena Kliot, Broker | Owner
Pulse International Realty - Miami
305.428.2268
[email protected]
www.pulseinternationalrealty.com
$1,000 BFF
Any new complete roofing or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate. Not valid with other offers or prior services. Expires 1/31/14.
30 Years Experience • Family Owned & Operated
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No High Pressure Sales Tactics
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NEW SHINGLE ROOF SPECIALISTS • SLATE ROOF REPAIRS • RUBBER ROOFS
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No High Pressure Sales Tactics • Professional Installation
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 1/31/14.
$1,000 BFF
UP TO
Any new
complete roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 1/31/14.
10º BFF
Any
roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 1/31/14.
FREE
ROOF AND
GUTTER
INSPECTION
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 1/31/14 .
FREE
GUTTERS
With any new roof
and siding job
UP TO

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