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www.westwindsorsun.com
AUG. 28-SEPT. 3, 2013
FREE
Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-15
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Coach
Recognized at national level
for his success. PAGE 11
Special to The Sun
Princeton Junction resident Andrew Werth, one of the 18 members of the Artists’ Gallery in Lam-
bertville, has an upcoming exhibition entitled, ‘Concepts and Realizations,’ which will run from
Sept. 5 to Oct. 6. There will be an opening reception at the gallery, located at 18 Bridge St. in
Lambertville, on Saturday, Sept. 7, from 4 to 7 p.m. Werth’s paintings are inspired by his interest
in cognitive science and the philosophy of mind, and consist of thousands of individually hand-
painted marks. To view more of his works, go to andrewwerth.com.
‘Concepts and Realizations’ exhibit
Residents react
to comment clause
BY HEATHER FIORE
The West Windsor Sun
Tensions flared at West Wind-
sor Township’s Council meeting
on Aug. 19, when residents react-
ed to a one-paragraph clause that
attempted to restrict a person’s
free speech.
The clause, which is an ordi-
nance listed under “political pro-
gramming” in the township code,
chapter 60-4, states that “the
cable TV channel is not intended
as a mechanism to promote any
particular issue or candidate for
public office.
“Declared candidates, includ-
ing their spouses and agents, who
are persons who have publicly
announced their intention to run
for office are precluded from ad-
vocating any cause, viewpoint or
opposed policy of a partisan na-
ture on the channel 100 days be-
fore the election [July 28].”
This was the first time the ex-
cerpt appeared on the agenda
this year, and also wasn’t incor-
porated into the agenda prior to
the election in 2011, according to
resident Jim Sullaway.
“It’s an abridgement of free
speech,” he said. “In my opinion,
this rule has a chilling effect on
fair and local debate. I know that
public comments can, at times,
get a bit heated and partisan, but
Council should take a more con-
structive view of the spirited de-
bate.”
“The public should be given
the opportunity to hear opposing
points of view no matter who is
expressing it. Free speech is what
distinguishes this country from
many others,” he said.
Several residents echoed Sull-
away’s comments, stating how
it’s a free speech violation, given
that the United States Constitu-
tion’s First Amendment trumps
all local laws.
Sharon Young, township clerk,
detailed the ordinance, which
was created in 2005 when West
Windsor Township collaborated
with Plainsboro Township to con-
solidate the local TV channel, on
which the Council meetings are
broadcast.
“We wanted to come up with a
set of rules that would be fair for
both the school and also the mu-
nicipalities, so we took these reg-
ulations off of the federal regula-
tions,” she said.
Township Attorney Mike Her-
bert detailed the township’s ordi-
nance and how it was derived
from the Federal Communica-
tions Commission’s Fairness
Doctrine and Equal Time Doc-
trine, which were enacted
through the Telecommunications
Act of 1996.
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
please see ORDINANCE, page 2
2 THE WEST WINDSOR SUN — AUG. 28-SEPT. 3, 2013
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Ordinance being
removed from
township code
“This dates back to the 1940s;
Congress and the FCC didn't want
cable stations being used as politi-
cal forums,” he said. “Now, with
the Internet and with the accumu-
lation of many cable channels,
about 1 1/2 years ago (in August
2011), the FCC repealed the lan-
guage of the Fairness Doctrine
under the support of the Obama
administration.”
Herbert also reiterated the 2008
case of Philip A. Besler v. West
Windsor-Plainsboro Regional
Board of Education, where the
state Supreme Court ruled in a
local parent’s favor, awarding him
$100,000 in damages after his free
speech rights were violated by the
board president at the time.
This reinforced the invalidity
of the ordinance, which is now
being removed from West Wind-
sor’s township code.
“It’s my opinion that ordi-
nance, as it’s now constituted, is
no longer legal, and therefore, we
should not have it on our agenda
any further,” Herbert said. “If we
were to continue to enforce this, it
could be interpreted as violation
of First Amendment rights.”
“This council is not here to stop
political speech or any speech,” he
added.
After the council meeting, Her-
bert sent a memo to the Council
saying it needs to eliminate that
provision in the ordinance.
“It's my duty as the township
attorney to prevent us from being
sued, and to prevent litigation
from occurring,” he said. “I'm also
sworn as an officer of the court to
uphold the state and federal con-
stitutions. As the old saying goes,
‘I may not like what you have to
say, but I will always defend your
right to say it.’”
To view the ordinance in its en-
tirety, go to westwindsornj.org,
click on “Code Book” to the left,
and go to Chapter 60, section 4
(types of programs).
ORDINANCE
Continued from page 1
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Grover Middle
School concert
raises $1,800
BY HEATHER FIORE
The West Windsor Sun
At the end of May, Grover Mid-
dle School hosted its annual
spring concert, which turned
into a benefit concert for the
music program at the Hugh J.
Boyd, Jr. Elementary School in
Seaside Heights.
The concert featured more
than 240 singers from the sixth-,
seventh- and eighth-grade choirs
along with Spotlight, the school’s
auditioned girl’s choir; Encore,
the school’s auditioned boy’s
choir; and the Faculty Hand
Chime Choir from Grover Middle
School, a group of teachers who
formed to perform a song on
hand chimes for the event.
The concert is a free event the
school hosts each year as a “gift
to the community,” said Jodi
Johnston, teacher at Grover Mid-
dle School.
“Our band, choir and orches-
tra concerts at Grover are always
our gift to the community, mean-
ing we never charge admission,”
she said.
“We simply talked about the
devastation of the storm
throughout the evening, showed
slides of the Shore communities
and the Boyd School, and asked
for donations at the end of the
night.”
Donations from the crowd tal-
please see CONCERT, page 6
E
N
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IR
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3
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charged and paid. Free Delivery is on purchases of $499 and more, only within Mercer, Mid-
dlesex, Monmouth, and Burlington Counties in NJ. PA deliveries not included. When applica-
ble, an assembly surcharge shall apply.The Sale and the Promotion expire September 30th,
2013. Not applicable on previous purchases and may not be combined with other discounts,
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lied more than $1,800, which benefited the
music program at the Hugh J. Boyd
School, as all of its instruments and music
classroom supplies were lost when the
school was flooded during Hurricane
Sandy.
“We were humbled to receive that
much,” Johnston said.
A couple of weeks ago, Johnston and
Louise Haemmerle, along with other
teachers from Grover Middle School, visit-
ed the Hugh J. Boyd School to donate the
money they raised and new instruments,
which included three snare drum kits, six
practice pads, music stands and a cart, 36
recorders, a piano bench and a piano
pedal. In addition to the donations, Russo’s
Music Center in Trenton donated a $200
gift card, a full-sized digital keyboard and
stand, and 50 drumsticks.
The idea to make their annual concert a
benefit came from a previous event that
Johnston and her two colleagues, Haem-
merle and Scott Marshall, organized for
the Musician’s Village in New Orleans
after Hurricane Katrina hit several years
ago.
“As we were programming music for the
spring 2013 concert, we realized we were
going back to some of our favorite reper-
toire that was performed at our 2007 con-
cert,” Johnston said.
“We were also excited to try an arrange-
ment of ‘The Rising’ by Bruce Springsteen
arranged by Mike Taylor, which was origi-
nally performed at the Lincoln Memorial
Concert in 2009, during the weekend cele-
brations prior to the inauguration of Pres-
ident Obama. Springsteen is a natural tie
in to New Jersey, so we started thinking
about how our own community had been
affected by Super Storm Sandy – Grover
Middle School was displaced to the Prince-
ton Alliance Church for one day – and how
much our Shore communities were even
more so affected, and are still very much
rebuilding. A theme for the concert be-
came readily apparent.”
After deciding that they wanted to help
one of the communities devastated by
Hurricane Sandy, Johnston and Haemmer-
le considered different options, including
inviting the governor and reaching out to
relief efforts, Johnston said.
“We then found out that Village Elemen-
tary had already created and participated
in a walk for the Hugh J. Boyd School via
the New Jersey Education Association,
the Wolf Walk, which raised $8,000 for the
in our opinion
6 THE WEST WINDSOR SUN — AUG. 28-SEPT. 3, 2013
1330 Route 206, Suite 211
Skillman, NJ 08558
609-751-0245
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Media LLC, 1330 Route 206, Suite 211,
Skillman, NJ 08558. It is mailed weekly to
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The Sun welcomes suggestions and com-
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mation about errors that may call for a cor-
rection to be printed.
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Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
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PUBLISHER Steve Miller
EXECUTIVE EDITOR Tim Ronaldson
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Joe Eisele
MANAGING EDITOR Mary L. Serkalow
PRODUCTION EDITOR Patricia Dove
WEST WINDSOR EDITOR Heather Fiore
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
EDITOR EMERITUS Alan Bauer
L
ittle by little, the effects of
health-care reform, or Oba-
macare as it’s commonly
known, are starting to come to light.
Change in price and type of health in-
surance, and the availability of public
health insurance, will take shape in
the coming months.
In July, the Obama administration
made a change to one aspect of health-
care reform that they said would help
make them a friend to American busi-
ness: They delayed the “employer
mandate” provision by one year, to
2015.
The provision has been controver-
sial since it was announced, because it
requires businesses with 50 or more
full-time employees to provide health
insurance.
The Obama administration pro-
claimed that the delay would give busi-
nesses relief they needed as they are
still attempting to get back up to full
speed.
But will it work? We doubt it will.
Take a look at Middletown, N.J., a
Monmouth-County township of ap-
proximately 66,552 residents as of the
2010 Census. Just last week, the town-
ship cut hours for part-time employees
to avoid having to offer them health in-
surance. The move saves the township
an estimated $775,000 per year.
It’s a great move for the township,
but not so great for the employees,
who now get fewer hours and no
health insurance through their em-
ployer – and possibly also the resi-
dents, who now may have to face a cut
in services.
Middletown made the move now,
even though the “employer mandate”
was pushed back to 2015.
Similar cost-saving tactics could be
used in our town, and the question
would be: How would that affect our
services, and possibly our neighbors’
own wallets?
That is unknown as of yet, but it’s a
reality we may have to face not only on
the public employment level, but also
on the private employment level, as
businesses make similar cost-cutting
measures.
It just makes no sense to us.
Not really friendly to business
Delay of Obamacare’s ‘employer mandate’ provision delays the inevitable
Your thoughts
What are your thoughts on the
“employer mandate” provision of the
Obama administration’s health-care
reform? Tell everyone what you think
through a letter to the editor.
Concert becomes benefit for hurricane victims
CONCERT
Continued from page 4
please see VILLAGE, page 10
THURSDAY AUG. 29
Family Move: The Iron Giant. 3 p.m.
to 4:45 p.m. at the West Windsor
Library. PG, 86 minutes. Hogarth
Hughes just rescued an enor-
mous robot that fell from the
stars to Earth. Now young Hoga-
rth has one very big friend and an
even bigger problem: how do you
keep a 50-foot-tall, steel-eating
giant a secret? No registration
required.
D.I.Y. Art: Ages 6 to 11. 4 p.m. to 4:45
p.m. at the West Windsor Library.
Come explore your creative side.
Various materials will be provid-
ed in this art program in order to
help the participant engage in
creative thinking. This program
supports your child's creative
independence without the need
for parental approval; thus par-
ents are asked to stay out of the
art room. Participants may also
be offered a chance to participate
in various art projects for the
library. No registration required.
SATURDAY AUG. 31
All branches of the Mercer County
Library System are closed today.
The library will reopen with nor-
mal hours on Tuesday, Sept. 3.
SUNDAY SEPT. 1
All branches of the Mercer County
Library System are closed today.
The library will reopen with nor-
mal hours on Tuesday, Sept. 3.
MONDAY SEPT. 2
All branches of the Mercer County
Library System are closed today.
TUESDAY SEPT. 3
Career Transitions with Alex Fre-
und. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the West
Windsor Library. Join Alex Freund
from Landing Expert Career
Coaching for a series of four,
three-hour career development
workshops. The four sessions will
include objectives and career
plan, creating a resume, social
media in your job search, net-
working, communications and
compensation negotiation. Each
session will also include self-
assessment and practice mock-
interviews in order to personalize
the sessions for the attendees.
Registration recommended. Reg-
ister online at mcl.org or call
(609) 275-8901.
Toddler Story Time and Craft: Ages
2 to 4. 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the
West Windsor Library. Join us for
a story and craft geared toward
toddlers. Siblings are welcome.
No registration is required.
CALENDAR PAGE 8 AUG. 28-SEPT. 3, 2013
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Village Elementary
School raised $8K
during Wolf Walk
NJEA Hurricane Back to School
Fund,” she said. “In addition to
the Wolf Walk, Village students
also raised funds in February
through their Paws for the Cause
project, which provided Boyd
School with an additional $350
for the purchase of new books.
Louise then made contact with
the Boyd music teacher to find
out what her needs were and
what damage had been done to
her classroom and instruments.”
Johnston said the school suf-
fered severe damage, including
the loss of most of its musical in-
struments and tools, such as
trumpets, flutes, pianos and
music stands.
Students were displaced to the
high school for the majority of
last year, and many families were
placed in FEMA housing for the
majority of that time.
“Even in WW-P school district,
I believe that school is a form of
home for our students, and I can't
imagine the elementary students
at HJB, Jr. being without a house
and a school,” Johnston said.
Jessica Thompson, music
teacher at the Hugh J. Boyd, Jr.
Elementary School, was grateful
for all the efforts put forth by
Grover Middle School, especially
those of Johnston and Haemmer-
le.
“It is hard to express how
much your generosity means to
me; even the thought behind you
supporting the music program
here in Seaside shows kindness
beyond measure, “ she said in a
letter addressed to Grover’s
teachers.
“To think of us, as a music de-
partment, exemplifies and
strengthens the community we
create as artists and musicians.”
Johnston added that after the
concert in May, sixth grade
drummer and Encore member
Louis Josephson also donated his
drumsticks he used that night to
the Hugh J. Boyd, Jr. Elementary
School.
“It was one of the most heart-
warming moments of the
evening,” she said. “He placed
them into our donation contain-
ers with a big smile on his face.”
“The most important lesson
we can teach to our students is
one of kindness and community,”
Johnston said.
“This experience is a great ex-
ample of how music ‘transcends
all barriers.’
“The heart of each student in
our choirs was big and red, proud
and beautiful on the stage that
night, and Louise and I were
proud to create an experience for
them that was truly part of a
greater good – helping create a
community of artists that looks
out for each other and ensuring
that the music, always, always
lives on.”
VILLAGE
Continued from page 6
Send us your West Windsor news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos?
Shoot an interesting video?
Drop us an email at [email protected].
Fax us at 856-427-0934. Call the editor at 609-751-0245.
By NICK COHEN
The West Windsor Sun
Following a string of success-
ful seasons, West Windsor-Plains-
boro High School South boys’
cross-country coach Kurt Wayton
was recognized at the national
level for his role in that success.
Wayton, who has helped to
build the WW-P South boys’ cross-
country and track and field pro-
grams into powerhouses, was
named one of the nation’s 10 most
inspiring coaches by Brooks
Sports Inc.
“It’s a nice honor,” Wayton
said. “We had a really solid spring
track season and a couple races
got some attention. We had a lot of
kids run real fast over a mile.
That got some notice at a national
level and it followed after that.”
Wayton, in his eighth year at
WW-P South, has helped to make
the Pirates consistent contenders
in distance events.
“It’s an accumulation of
things. The program has been
consistently solid the last seven
or eight years. We’ve had a lot of
kids run at a high level,” Wayton
said.
Last season, the Pirate boys
took third in the state cross-coun-
try final, their highest finish ever.
Wayton continues to strive to
push his teams to realize their po-
tential. Each year is a chance to
learn more about how to steer
and inspire his team better.
“You don’t repeat failures,”
Wayton said. “I don’t think my
core ideologies or themes I em-
phasize have evolved much.
They’re the same bedrock.”
Wayton admits that being a
coach isn’t easy, but ultimately it
is rewarding.
“Being a coach is a tough job if
done right. Kids can make it
tough on you. But at the end of
the day, my job is to be on the
front line of human improvement
at a time when young people are
desperately searching for an-
swers. We provide them with an-
swers, we provide them with con-
fidence, we provide them with the
tools to live an extraordinary
life,” Wayton said.
Wayton says he loves to coach
because he gets to help young peo-
ple look their potential in the eye.
He spends countless hours ex-
ploring the methods of the most
successful running coaches and
using his findings to create a
training plan that is specifically
calculated to get results.
“It isn’t that I’ve evolved, but
progressed. I see what things
have worked and what hasn’t and
try to build on the things that
have worked,” Wayton said.
“Hard work is non-negotiable.
You try to find out what is too
hard. You don’t want to go over
that line.”
Wayton doesn’t demand any-
thing from his team that he does-
n’t expect from himself. The story
of him shoveling snow off the
first two lanes of the WW-P South
track during his free period is
well known.
“Going the extra mile is impor-
tant in anything you do,” Wayton
said. “The people that end up
making it are the people that do
the extra things that other people
don’t. Outworking is a matter of
mastering the details.”
Wayton was surprised to find
out he not only had been nomi-
nated but was a finalist due to an
online vote.
“It’s a surprise,” Wayton said.
“When you coach at the high
school level, there’s no money in-
volved, there’s very little praise. It
has to come from a concern that
you’re giving these children a
chance to find something about
themselves that they wouldn’t
have had tested.
“We give as much attention to
the kids at the back of the pack as
the ones in the front.”
AUG. 28-SEPT. 3, 2013 – THE WEST WINDSOR SUN 11
Brian M. Hughes, Mercer County Executive
Mercer County Board of Chosen Freeholders
Dr. Larry Katz, Dir., Coop. Ext., Sr. Assoc. Dir. NJAES
Cooperating Agencies: Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and County Boards of Chosen
Freeholders. Rutgers Cooperative Extension a unit of the New Jersey Agriculture Experimental Station, is an equal opportunity
program provider and employer. Contact your local Extension Office for information regarding special needs or accommodations.
Contact the State Extension Director’s Office if you have concerns related to discrimination, 732-932-5000. ext. 584.
Chad Ripberger, County Department Head
Cross country coach Kurt Wayton
recognized at national level
Send us your West Windsor news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos?
Shoot an interesting video?
Drop us an email at [email protected].
Fax us at 856-427-0934. Call the editor at 609-751-0245.
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CHERRY HILL
H&DD0NPIELD
1330 State Road (Route 206)
Suite 211
Skillman, NJ 088558
609.751.0245
elauwit.com
CINN&ÆINS0N
DELR&N
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AUG. 28-SEPT. 3, 2013 – THE WEST WINDSOR SUN 13
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Selected Varieties of Purina
Exclusive Dog & Cat Food
See store for details. While Supplies Last.
your community music school
Babe Ruth League
hosts Southern N.J.
State Tournament
The West Windsor Plainsboro
Babe Ruth League hosted the
Southern New Jersey State Tour-
nament from July 18 through
July 27. The WW-P Babe Ruth 13U
All Stars avenged a tough loss in
the District 1 championship game
by knocking out rival Notting-
ham, 10-4, on July 21 in the South-
ern NJ State Tournament. How-
ever, WW-P was eliminated on
Tuesday with a 4-1 loss to Wash-
ington Township.
The tournament, held at West
Windsor Community Park, con-
cluded on Saturday, July 27 with
Mount Laurel advancing to the
Mid-Atlantic Regional Tourna-
ment.
The league would like to thank
its many sponsors, including
Case's Pork Roll, Wegman's, Mc
Caffrey's Supermarket, Trader
Joe's, Amerigas, Epic Communi-
cations and Philly Pretzel Factory
of Robbinsville. This tournament
would not have been possible
without the dedication of so
many volunteers, especially
Stephen Lichtenstein, Jason
Welch, Michelle Welch, Dana
Krug, Bernie Froio, Ed Doherty,
Max Tanner, Hayley Merrill,
Michael Stern, Jacob Bellotti,
Josh Zaklis and Simeon Kamble.
The WW-P Babe Ruth League is
a non-profit organization that
strives to teach the fundamentals
of baseball, good sportsmanship,
character and teamwork to the
youth of West Windsor and
Plainsboro.
Concrete Masonry
classified
T HE WE S T WI N DS O R S U N
AUGUST 28-SEPTEMBER 3, 2013 PAGE 14
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. • Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 • Add color to any box ad for $20. • Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. • Your Classified ad will run in all 5 of The Sun newspapers each week! • Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. • No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE
ADS
Only
$
20per week
H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: [email protected]
Hopewell Sun • Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun • Princeton Sun
West Windsor Sun
BOX
ADS Only
$
25per week List a text-only ad for your yard
sale, job posting or merchandise.
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CIeaning
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Reliable, Affordable
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Call Mila
609-620-0849
Email:
[email protected]
Mason • Restoration
Brick • Pointing • Steps
Foundation • Chimney
• Waterproofing
609-672-4145
Free Estimates
TWO BROTHERS MASONRY
Concrete Masonry
1oo pooped 1o scoop?
We provide weekly scooper service s1or1ing o1
$
I3/week
saving our planet, one pile at a time
856-665-6769
www.alldogspoop.com
GET $10.00 OFF YOUR FIRST SERVICE!
Locally owned and operated.
Pet Care
PooI Services
POOLS
New º Rebuild º Service
Open º Close º Liners
Paint º Removals
Patios º Decks
Call: 908-359-3000
CLASSIFIED
AUGUST 28-SEPTEMBER 3, 2013 - THE WEST WINDSOR SUN 15
If you’re reading your
competitor’s ad?
Who’s making money…
YOU OR THEM?
Advertise with us!
Special Classified offers available.
Don’t delay! Call today!
(856) 427-0933
INTO ACTION!
(609) 751-0245

$1,000 BFF
Any new complete
roofing or siding job
Must present coupon at time of
estimate. Not valid with other offers
or prior services. Expires 9/30/13.
FAST EMERGENCY SERVICE!
30 Years Experience
Family Owned & Operated
High Quality Products
Senior Citizen Discount
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FREE ESTIMATES!
UP TO 10º BFF
Any roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of
estimate. Not valid with other offers
or prior services. Expires 9/30/13.
FREE
ROOF &
GUTTER INSPECTION
Must present coupon at time of
estimate. Not valid with other offers
or prior services. Expires 9/30/13.
FREE
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With any new roof & siding job
Must present coupon at time of
estimate. Not valid with other offers
or prior services. Expires 9/30/13.

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