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www.westwindsorsun.com
NOVEMBER 20–26, 2013
FREE
Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-11
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Fighting cancer
Student beats disease,
fundraises for a cure. PAGE 2
Residents, veterans gather for ceremony
BY HEATHER FIORE
The Sun
On Nov. 11, around 80 people,
the majority of whom were veter-
ans, gathered on the municipal
building’s lawn to honor the fall-
en soldiers who have made the ul-
timate sacrifice to maintain our
freedom.
West Windsor Township hosts
this event each year to commemo-
rate our nation’s heroes. It is co-
sponsored by the American Le-
gion Post 76 and the Township
Council.
The ceremony began with
some words from Bob Cox, com-
mander for American Legion
Post 76 and a Vietnam War veter-
an, and the presentation of colors
by the West Windsor Police De-
partment Honor Guard Unit, fol-
lowed by “service songs.”
Attendees sang along to the
service songs – designated songs
for each branch of the U.S. armed
forces – including “The Army
Song,” “Semper Paratus (Coast
Guard),” “The Marines’ Hymn,”
“The U.S. Air Force,” and “An-
chors Aweigh (Navy),” all led by
June Fiske.
Mayor Shing-Fu Hsueh, along
with Council president George
Borek, Councilwomen Kristina
Samonte and Linda Geevers and
Councilman Bryan Maher, were
all in attendance to provide some
history and reflect upon the im-
HEATHER FIORE/The Sun
Mayor Shing-Fu Hsueh and West Windsor Township Council members assist 94-year-old Army veteran Henry J. Frank, who is also a member
of th American Legion Post No. 76. Frank, a Princeton resident, served in the Army from 1942 to 1953, and was commissioned 71 years prior
to Nov. 11, 2013. please see HSUEH, page 7
2 THE WEST WINDSOR SUN — NOVEMBER 20–26, 2013
By HEATHER FIORE
The Sun
On Oct. 16, 2005, at the age of 3,
Elsa Moroney, now a sixth grader
at Grover Middle School, was di-
agnosed with acute lymphoblas-
tic leukemia.
In March of this year, eight
years after battling a disease that
claims the lives of more than
1,000 children each year, Moroney
was officially diagnosed cancer-
free.
To celebrate her defeat of the
disease, Moroney hosted a school-
wide fundraising event on Oct. 16
– exactly eight years after she was
originally diagnosed – known as
Alex’s Lemonade Stand.
Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foun-
dation is a non-profit organiza-
tion whose goal is to raise money
and awareness of childhood can-
cer causes, primarily research
into new treatments and cures;
and to encourage and empower
others, especially children, to get
involved and make a difference
for children with cancer, accord-
ing to the website.
With the help of her guidance
counselor, Dawn Gilchrist, and
the AMIGOS – a co-curricular
club of eighth-grade students
who focus on developing, support-
ing and maintaining a positive
school climate for GMS students –
Moroney planned the special
event.
“Elsa and the AMIGOS made
morning announcements over
the P.A. for several days prior to
the event, encouraging students
and staff to wear yellow that day,”
said Brian Harris, principal of
GMS. “The GMS team (each team
is made up of about 100 students)
with the highest percentage of
students wearing yellow were re-
warded with an exclusive sur-
prise performance by the admin-
istration.”
Moroney said she was adorned
in gold and yellow clothing that
day – the official color of child-
hood cancer – and was excited to
see her fellow students doing the
same, supporting the cause.
“It was a really good feeling
walking around the school and
seeing all that yellow and gold,”
she said.
Along with encouraging people
to wear gold or yellow, Moroney
set up a lemonade stand during
the lunch periods on Oct. 16.
The AMIGOS advisors pur-
chased the supplies and made the
lemonade, and AMIGOS students
and parent volunteers manned
the lemonade stand.
Moroney and the AMIGOS
were able to raise $405 for ALSF,
which will go toward funding
childhood cancer research, an
area of cancer research that’s not
widely recognized, according to
Karen Sue, Moroney’s mother.
“Less than 1 percent of all
funds go to pediatric cancer re-
search,” Sue said. “If we can get
more people aware that this is im-
portant and kids’ lives are at
stake, everyone will know to wear
gold in September for pediatric
cancer month; it's not just about
pink in October. The more people
that are aware can let our con-
gresspeople know that funding
pediatric research is just as im-
portant as funding adult cancer
research.”
“We try to do as much as we
can to let people know, and to
raise money for ALSF,” Sue said.
Sue said she was impressed by
the generosity of GMS students
on Oct. 16, after observing the
lengths the children went to to
support the cause.
“I'm really proud of Elsa for
initiating the event at Grover,”
she said. “I figured maybe 20 or 30
kids would bring in $1, but the
first class brought in $150 on its
own; every single kid brought
something, and the students that
didn’t have enough to buy a cup of
lemonade would come up with
hands full of change and whatev-
er they had to donate. It was
amazing.”
Moroney was also appreciative
of the fact that her fellow class-
mates and students donated what-
ever they could at the time.
“That was the best part,” she
said. “It was really awesome that
Child defeats cancer, hosts
fundraiser to help find a cure
please see STUDENT, page 7
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1958 Lawrenceville Rd., Lawrenceville, NJ 08648
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Meet staff, members and clergy!
NOVEMBER 20–26, 2013 – THE WEST WINDSOR SUN 3
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Special to The Sun
Second graders from Maurice Hawk Elementary School participated
in the ‘Count on Me Kids’ program funded by the WW-P Alliance for
the Prevention of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse. Pictured above are
(from left): Abram Chen, Akshay Bhat, Jessica Bisgaier, Srijan
Velury, Amanda Browne, Tomaz Chevres, Jack O'Donnell, Shreya
Gupta, Alexandria Elias, Tamanna Desai, Stanley Kim and Isha
Veerubhotia. In the back row are Kim Schubert, ‘Count on Me Kids’
instructor (left), and Maurice Hawk Elementary School teacher
Jaime Cook (right).
Students part of ‘Count on me Kids’
Email us at [email protected]
This past summer, 47 Boy
Scouts from Troop No. 66 earned
157 merit badges and earned
many awards at their annual
week-long summer camp at Rod-
ney Scout Reservation located on
the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland.
Under the leadership of Senior
Patrol Leader Connor Munsch,
Troop No. 66 won the Honor
Troop Award and the Clean
Campsite Award.
The team of Saagar Chitale,
Alex He, Pavan Hedge, Connor
Munsch, Chris Orsini and Shiv-
am Patel won the Volleyball
Championship. The team of Shiv-
am Patel, Ryder Van Dyke, Nico-
las Gonzalez, and Stephen Perez
won the Iron Man Competition.
Zac Scavo won the Nature Award
and Saagar Chitale completed the
Mile Swim in the Chesapeake
Bay.
In September, Webelos Scouts
from West Windsor Cub Scout
Packs No. 40, 48, and 66 along with
their parents attended Troop No.
66’s annual Turkey Roast Cam-
pout and had fun learning how to
tie knots and how to use fire and
knives safely in the outdoors; and
they performed entertaining
skits at the evening campfire pro-
gram.
Boy Scout Troop No. 66 is based
in West Windsor and is sponsored
by the West Windsor Lions Club.
Its mission is to “instill our young
people with lifetime values in citi-
zenship, service and leadership
through a boy-run, adult-guided
program that offers fun, friend-
ship, adventure and advance-
ment.” Troop No. 66 offers weekly
troop meetings and monthly cam-
pouts for boys aged 11 to 17. More
information about Troop No. 66
can be found at
westwindsor66.mytroop.us.
NOVEMBER 20–26, 2013 – THE WEST WINDSOR SUN 5
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Boy Scouts earn 157 merit badges
West Windsor Arts Council
invites its members to submit
work for its juried 2014 Member
Exhibition: Out of the Blue. Out
of the Blue is inspired from a
monochromic theme yet is open
to interpretation. All artwork
will be juried by Eric Drotch.
Blue is a universal color from
nature that can evoke calm or is
associated with feeling blue.
Works suggestive of blue that
aren’t literal representations
are also encouraged. Out of the
Blue will exhibit from Jan. 6,
through Feb. 28 at the West
Windsor Art Center Gallery.
Artists who are current
members of WWAC are invited
to submit work. Artists may
join as a West Windsor Arts
Council member at the time of
submission.
Submissions for jury review
must be submitted electronical-
ly by Dec. 13.
For more information and to
download the exhibition’s full
prospectus, go to westwindso-
rartscenter.org/out-of-the-blue-
juried-artist-exhibit-prospec-
tus.html.
For more information, please
visit westwindsorarts.org, call
(609) 716-1931 or email
[email protected].
West Windsor Arts Council
accepting work for juried show
West Windsor Mayor Shing-
Fu Hsueh recently announced
that the township has been ap-
proved to receive a grant in the
amount of $214,080 from the
Hazard Mitigation Grant Pro-
gram-Energy Allocation Initia-
tive.
In total, $25 million is being
allocated to 147 out of 750 juris-
dictions and public entities to
support energy resilience proj-
ects. West Windsor Township’s
request to pursue energy re-
silience for critical facilities
scored among the highest in the
state.
“This grant could not have
been more timely as we move
forward with cost effective and
environmentally sound initia-
tives, including the climate ac-
tion plan, BPU energy audit,
and municipal building space
needs analysis and future reno-
vation,” Hsueh said.
In a letter to Hsueh from state
Sen. Shirley Turner, she stated
that the township could be eligi-
ble for substantial additional in-
centives should there be a deci-
sion to pursue a more sophisti-
cated technology.
The status of West Windsor
Township as a more sustainable
community is elevated as a re-
sult of being awarded this
grant.
Township to receive grant
OBITUARIES
The Sun will print obituaries,
free of charge.
6 THE WEST WINDSOR SUN — NOVEMBER 20–26, 2013
1330 Route 206, Suite 211
Skillman, NJ 08558
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 1330 Route 206, Suite 211,
Skillman, NJ 08558. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08550 ZIP code.
If you are not on the mailing list, six-month
subscriptions are available for $39.99. PDFs
of the publication are online, free of charge.
For information, please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
[email protected]. For advertis-
ing information, call 609-751-0245 or
email [email protected].
The Sun welcomes suggestions and com-
ments from readers – including any infor-
mation about errors that may call for a cor-
rection to be printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to [email protected], via fax at
609-751-0245, or via the mail. You can drop
them off at our office, too.
The Sun reserves the right to reprint your
letter in any medium – including electroni-
cally.
PUBLISHER Steve Miller
EXECUTIVE EDITOR Tim Ronaldson
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Joe Eisele
MANAGING EDITOR Mary L. Serkalow
CONTENT EDITOR Kristen Dowd
WEST WINDSOR EDITOR Heather Fiore
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
EDITOR EMERITUS Alan Bauer
C
ontroversy surrounds almost
every bill that is proposed at
the state government level. If
the actual effects of the bill don’t come
in question, then the partisanship of
it, or the motivation behind it, are
often scrutinized.
But a bill that was proposed recently
by state Sen. Richard Codey doesn’t fit
into that category, at least in the world
according to us.
Codey’s bill would expand New Jer-
sey’s distracted driving law to include
drivers who are temporarily stopped –
whether in a traffic jam, red light or
stop sign. Basically, it would ban all
use of a cell phone while a person is
seated in the driver’s seat of a vehicle.
The bill would also require the written
driver’s test to include questions on
distracted driving.
When explaining his position on the
bill, Codey referred to the state’s DUI
law: “If you’re at a red light and you’re
drunk, you’re DUI,” he said.
Makes perfect sense to us. Drivers
can be distracted, and cause major ac-
cidents, even if they are temporarily
stopped. How many times have you
seen other drivers – because you’ve
never done this, right? – hurriedly ac-
celerate at a light after they realize,
when they look up from their phone,
that the light has turned green? Situa-
tions like this can cause accidents.
Opponents of the bill, if they can be
considered this, are saying that the
true motives behind the bill are ques-
tionable. Even Codey admitted to this,
at least partially, saying that the real
aim of the bill is to put New Jersey in
line with federal standards for the Dis-
tracted Driving Grant Program. Cur-
rently, the state’s law isn’t in line with
these standards, so it doesn’t qualify
for grants.
To that, we say: Who cares?
Who cares if the motive behind en-
hancing New Jersey’s distracted driv-
ing law is to receive federal grant
money? That money would be put to
use to educate and discourage people
from driving distracted.
It’s not Codey’s fault, or the Legisla-
ture’s fault, that the federal govern-
ment requires certain standards to re-
ceive grant money. Since that money
will go to good use, we should do what
is necessary to get it.
The only thing that should matter
here is the safety of those on the road,
and this bill enhances that safety.
in our opinion
Get off your phone!
Legislature should pass bill to ban phone usage for drivers
Your thoughts
How do you feel about enhanced dis-
tracted driving laws? Is it enough?
Should more be done? Are legislators
taking it too far? Share your thoughts
through a letter to the editor.
Tess Kowalski has delivered more than a
dozen presentations on behalf of the New
Jersey Center for Tourette Syndrome & As-
sociated Disorders. The West Windsor na-
tive has spoken to students, teachers, doc-
tors and residents about what it’s like to
live with TS – an inherited, misdiagnosed,
misunderstood neurological disorder that
affects one in 100 kids.
But prior to Oct. 8, each of her presenta-
tions had taken place at hospitals or
schools across New Jersey. On this particu-
lar Tuesday, however, Kowalski was invited
to speak at one of America’s leading insti-
tutions of higher learning – Yale Universi-
ty. Her talk about Patient-Centered Medical
Education at the Yale Child Study Center
not only was well received by the nearly
120 faculty and trainees of the Yale School
of Medicine, it was lauded and encouraged
to be replicated – nationwide.
“In an academic clinical research center
– one that is the birthplace of much of the
important work into the causes and treat-
ment of TS over the past 40 years – it was
very important for clinicians and re-
searchers to hear from the teenagers them-
selves,” said Dr. Robert King, a professor of
Child Psychiatry at the Yale Child Study
Center and a key partner of NJCTS.
“There is a lot of excitement here about
the thought of the NJCTS Patient-Cen-
tered Medical Education program being
used as a model with children and families
affected by other clinical disorders.”
Patient-Centered Medical Education is a
unique education program that provides
doctors and physicians in training an op-
portunity to hear directly from adoles-
cents/young adults with Tourette syn-
drome and their families. It fosters an un-
derstanding of the perspectives, stresses
and needs of families living with TS and
associated disorders such as OCD, ADHD
and anxiety.
Most of Kowalski’s experience has been
derived from speaking at schools near her
West Windsor home, in hospitals through-
out Central Jersey and at her synagogue –
Congregation Kehilat Shalom in Belle
Mead. Educating doctors has been an
“amazing” experience for her, too.
Kowalski speaks at Yale University on behalf of New Jersey
Center for Tourette Syndrome & Associated Disorders
please see PROGRAM, page 7
NOVEMBER 20–26, 2013 – THE WEST WINDSOR SUN 7
N] LOTTERY
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LOCATED ACRO88 FROM AVALON WATCH APARTMENT8 IN PRINCETON ]UNCTION
(AII diacount offera are for Iimited time onIy)
portance of Veterans Day.
“At a time when our country is
forced to draw strength every day
to face our fears, we are particu-
larly grateful for the courage, pa-
triotism and selflessness of those
who served our country – both in
the past and today,” Hsueh said.
“We remember those who made
the ultimate sacrifice of giving
their lives for our country and for
all of us.
“And, we remember their fami-
lies who gave to our country their
most treasured possessions –
their loved ones.”
Armistice Day was first recog-
nized in 1926 through a United
States congressional resolution,
and was designated a national
holiday 12 years later, Borek said.
Fewer than 20 years later, in
1954, President Dwight Eisenhow-
er signed a bill proclaiming Nov.
11 as Veterans Day, Samonte
added.
Through various national
hymns, including the national an-
them and “God Bless America,”
and other patriotic activities,
such as the laying of wreath and
taps performed by West Windsor
Township Sgt. Robert Fow, all at-
tendees embraced the national
holiday.
“As we go our separate ways,
let our last thought focus on the
necessity of thanking and appre-
ciating every day – not just today
– those who choose to walk the
brave path of serving our coun-
try,” Hsueh said.
there were kids that went that
extra step.”
Because of the success of this
year’s event, Moroney said she
hopes to make it an annual tradi-
tion at GMS.
“I definitely do want to contin-
ue doing this because when it
comes to life, there's nothing you
can buy,” she said. “You have one
life, so you can't really give
enough back to the people that
saved your life.”
Moroney also said she wants to
ensure this event continues even
after she leaves GMS.
“What is most impressive is
that Elsa took the microphone in
front of her classmates to give a
heartfelt and exuberant thank
you for supporting the effort,”
Harris said. “The enthusiasm
that Elsa has for being a middle
school student at Grover is inspir-
ing. She demonstrated no fear in
speaking in front the entire sixth,
seventh- and eighth-grade classes
that day, and walks our halls with
one of the most uplifting smiles
you will ever see.”
“The work put forth by Elsa,
teachers Dawn Gilchrist and Kim
Hoeflinger, and the AMIGOS was
inspiring to say the least. It truly
was a fine example of ‘The Great-
ness of Grover,’” Harris said.
HSUEH
Continued from page 1
STUDENT
Continued from page 2
Hsueh: Thank veterans every day
Student wants to fundraise every year
“TS has really changed my
life,” said Kowalski, 14, whose fa-
ther, Tim, also spoke to the Yale
audience about the parent per-
spective of having an adolescent
with Tourette. “Even though my
tics are painful and stressful, and
people stare at me all the time,
I’m now this confident girl who
can speak in front of people and
tell them I have TS without being
shy or cowering in front of them.
It’s amazing.”
Since its inception in 2010, the
Patient-Centered Medical Educa-
tion program has been presented
by NJCTS at more than 15 hospi-
tals in New Jersey.
“It is the goal of the New Jer-
sey Center for Tourette Syndrome
& Associated Disorders, through
the Patient-Centered Medical Ed-
ucation program, to bring each
doctor and resident to a level of
understanding about TS so that
each of the one in 100 kids affect-
ed by the neurological disorder
can be properly diagnosed, treat-
ed and someday cured,” NJCTS
Executive Director Faith W. Rice
said. "Tess' ability to communi-
cate that so clearly and profes-
sionally to these doctors is a cru-
cial part of that process."
For more information about
the Patient-Centered Medical Ed-
ucation program, or to schedule it
at your location, please call (908)
575-7350 or visit njcts.org.
PROGRAM
Continued from page 6
Program at more than 15 hospitals in state
National Youth
Crisis Hotline
(800) 448-4663
PSA
Parents Anonymous/
Family Helpline
(800) 843-5437
PSA
Addiction Hotline
of New Jersey
(800) 238-2333
PSA
Special to The Sun
Village School teachers Eileen Beam, Carol Murphy and Kristi
Baur and Millstone River School teachers Marianne Macnama-
ra and Amy Coffey, and Tori Coffey participated in ‘Make A Dif-
ference Day.’
Making a difference
WEDNESDAY NOV. 20
Toddler Story Time and Craft: Ages
2 to 4. 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the
West Windsor Library. Please join
us for stories and a craft geared
toward toddlers. Siblings are wel-
come. No registration required.
THURSDAY NOV. 21
Picture Books and Craft: Ages 3 to
5. 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the West
Windsor Library. Join us for sto-
ries, finger plays, clothesline
rhymes and music, followed by a
craft. No registration required.
FRIDAY NOV. 22
Sing and Play: 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.
at the West Windsor Library. Join
us for a sing-along program with
guitar and CD music. Action
songs, finger plays and musical
instruments encourage audience
participation. No registration
required.
SATURDAY NOV. 23
Mind and Meditation: 10:30 a.m. to
11:30 a.m. at the West Windsor
Library. Want a healthy and
stress-free way of life? Then
come to this seminar and learn
some simple yet powerful breath-
ing-techniques, and experience
guided meditation; break through
your barriers and realize your full
potential, and live a happier life.
The Mind & Meditation Program
is a free community service initia-
tive by The Art of Living Founda-
tion.
SUNDAY NOV. 24
Bagels and Tots: 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.
at Congregation Beth Chaim. Par-
ents, you and your young chil-
dren can be introduced to a wide
variety of Jewish concepts
through art, music, stories and
song. Parents and children will
learn about Jewish holidays,
meet our Rabbis and our Cantor,
learn Hebrew songs, and share
snacks and laughter at each
meeting. Discounts for families
who are already connected to
Beth Chaim are available. For
more information, obtain the
schedule, or to register your child
or children, contact Anne
Berman-Waldorf, Director of Life-
long Education, at (609) 799-
9693 or
[email protected]. Con-
gregation Beth Chaim is located
at 329 Village Road East in
Princeton Junction.
MONDAY NOV. 25
Alphabet Time: Ages 4 to 6. 6 p.m.
to 6:45 p.m. at the West Windsor
Library. Besides focusing on one
letter each week, Ms. Lisa has
planned a few surprising new
ways to practice your alphabet.
We'll hear stories, sing songs and
do a letter-related craft. Registra-
tion required. There are 15 spaces
available. Go to mcl.org to regis-
ter.
TUESDAY NOV. 26
Fall Movie Marathon: “Monsters,
Inc.” 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the
West Windsor Library. Join us for
the fourth week of our annual fall
movie marathon. This week’s
movie is “Monsters, Inc.” No reg-
istration required.
CALENDAR PAGE 8 NOVEMBER 20–26, 2013
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T HE   WE S T WI N DS O R   S U N
NOVEMBER 20-26, 2013 PAGE 10
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. • Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 • Add color to any box ad for $20. • Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
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